ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 8 Issue 16

2015

Volume 8, Issue 16

Pages 2571–2751

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Cover Picture: Activation Effect of Fullerene C60 on the Carbon Dioxide Absorption Performance of Amine-Rich Polypropylenimine Dendrimers (ChemSusChem 16/2015) (page 2571)

      Dr. Enrico Andreoli  and Prof. Andrew R. Barron 

      Article first published online: 10 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500927

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      The Cover Picture shows the activation effect of fullerene C60 on the amino groups of polypropylenimine (PPI) dendrimers toward CO2 capture. The addition of C60 to PPI to form PPI–C60 cross-linked composites results in a reduction of the energy barrier of CO2 absorption by the amine functionalities of PPI. This finding supports the existence of a nonaffinity “repulsive” effect between hydrophobic C60 and hydrophilic amines that forces the latter to spread out and be actively exposed to CO2. More details can be found in the Full Paper by Andreoli et al. on page 2635 in Issue 16, 2015. (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500605).

    2. Back Cover: Reduced Graphene Oxide Bipolar Membranes for Integrated Solar Water Splitting in Optimal pH (ChemSusChem 16/2015) (page 2752)

      Michael B. McDonald, Jared P. Bruce, Kevin McEleney and Prof. Michael S. Freund

      Article first published online: 18 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201501073

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      The Back Cover shows a three-layer membrane used to house a solar-driven water splitting system consisting of rod-shaped semiconductor absorbers. The central layer, consisting of semi-reduced graphene oxide, conducts charge for efficient and wireless connection and catalyzes water dissociation. It is sandwiched between two ion-exchange layers that are selective towards either protons or hydroxide. This membrane system, therefore, allows oxidation and reduction to occur under basic and acidic conditions (i.e., in a steady-state pH gradient) and can thus stabilize inexpensive and earth-abundant conversion materials used for the widespread generation of solar fuels. More details can be found in the Full Paper by McDonald et al. on page 2645 in Issue 16, 2015. (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500538).

  2. Cover Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Activation Effect of Fullerene C60 on the Carbon Dioxide Absorption Performance of Amine-Rich Polypropylenimine Dendrimers (page 2572)

      Dr. Enrico Andreoli  and Prof. Andrew R. Barron 

      Article first published online: 10 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500926

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      “The institute′s mission is building the bridge to a sustainable, affordable, and secure energy future…” This and more about the story behind the research that inspired the Cover image is presented in the Cover Profile. Read the full text of the corresponding research at 10.1002/cssc.201500605. View the Front Cover here: 10.1002/cssc.201500927.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 16/2015 (pages 2573–2579)

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201581611

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: ChemSusChem 16/2015 (pages 2580–2581)

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201581621

  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
  6. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Nanocatalysis in Flow (pages 2586–2605)

      Dr. Roberto Ricciardi, Prof. Dr. Jurriaan Huskens and Dr. Willem Verboom

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500514

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      Full stream ahead! The anchoring of nanoparticles in microfluidic reactors results in devices in which various types of catalytic reactions can be performed efficiently. Different ways to support these nanoparticles are reviewed and their advantages and disadvantages are highlighted.

  7. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Synergistic Carbon Dioxide Capture and Conversion in Porous Materials (pages 2606–2608)

      Dr. Yugen Zhang and Dr. Diane S. W. Lim

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500745

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      And when we are together: Global climate change and excessive CO2 emissions have caused widespread public concern in recent years. Tremendous efforts have been made towards CO2 capture and conversion. However, realizing the attractive prospect of direct, in situ chemical conversion of captured CO2 into other chemicals remains a challenge. This Highlight showcases some recent successful, examples.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Upgrading Lignocellulosic Products to Drop-In Biofuels via Dehydrogenative Cross-Coupling and Hydrodeoxygenation Sequence (pages 2609–2614)

      Dr. Sanil Sreekumar, Dr. Madhesan Balakrishnan, Konstantinos Goulas, Dr. Gorkem Gunbas, Dr. Amit A. Gokhale, Lin Louie, Adam Grippo, Dr. Corinne D. Scown, Prof. Alexis T. Bell and Prof.  F. Dean Toste

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500754

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      Drop into renewable diesel: Dehydrogenative cross-condensation of lignocellulosic furfural with a variety of alcohols derived from biological and petrochemical sources provides aldol adducts that are further subjected to hydrodeoxygenation. The alkanes furnished from this process are drop-in components for jet and diesel fuels. The life cycle assessment of this technology shows net reductions in greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions of 57–68 % relative to petroleum-derived fuels.

    2. Enhanced Charge Transport in Tantalum Nitride Nanotube Photoanodes for Solar Water Splitting (pages 2615–2620)

      Dr. Lei Wang, Nhat Truong Nguyen, Xuemei Zhou, Imgon Hwang, Dr. Manuela S. Killian and Prof. Dr. Patrik Schmuki

      Article first published online: 17 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500632

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      Catching a Ta3N5: Layers of Ta3N5 nanotubes grown by a two-step anodization process show not only improved order and enhanced overall light absorption in the nanotube layers, but also provide a significantly reduced interface charge resistance at the nitride/metal interface due to subnitride (TaNx) formation. Such nanotube anodes afford a 15-fold increase of the photocurrent compared with conventional nanotubular tantalum nitride electrodes under simulated sunlight conditions.

    3. Highly Reversible Lithium-ions Storage of Molybdenum Dioxide Nanoplates for High Power Lithium-ion Batteries (pages 2621–2624)

      Dr. Xiaolin Liu, Prof. Jun Yang, Prof. Wenhua Hou, Prof. Jiulin Wang and Yanna Nuli

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500574

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      Know the limits: MoO2 nanoplates are facilely synthesized through a hydrothermal process. In electrochemical tests of MoO2 as anode in lithium-ion batteries, the potential window is set between 1.0 and 2.5 V to avoid its conversion reaction, which would result in large volume expansion and structural disintegration. As a result, the MoO2 nanoplates exhibit an extremely high cycle stability and capacity compared with that of Li4Ti5O12.

    4. Selective Deposition of Insulating Metal Oxide in Perovskite Solar Cells with Enhanced Device Performance (pages 2625–2629)

      Dr. Youfeng Yue, Dr. Xudong Yang, Dr. Yongzhen Wu, Dr. Noviana Tjitra Salim, Dr. Ashraful Islam, Dr. Takeshi Noda and Prof. Dr. Liyuan Han

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500518

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      Isolating and conducting: A quasi-top-open insulating metal oxide overlayer is deposited on a nanoparticulate TiO2 (np-TiO2) layer for perovskite solar cells. This insulating hole-blocking layer mainly covers the bottom part of the mesoporous layer with less coverage at the top to keep sufficient electron conduction within the perovskite film. It effectively prevents charge recombination, giving rise to an open-circuit voltage that is higher for a cell without this layer.

    5. A Bioinspired Molecular Polyoxometalate Catalyst with Two Cobalt(II) Oxide Cores for Photocatalytic Water Oxidation (pages 2630–2634)

      Jie Wei, Yingying Feng, Panpan Zhou, Yan Liu, Jingyin Xu, Rui Xiang, Prof. Dr. Yong Ding, Chongchao Zhao, Linyuan Fan and Changwen Hu

      Article first published online: 30 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500490

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      Encore: The study of an all-inorganic, oxidatively and hydrolytically stable polyoxometalate embedding two CoII4O3 cores as water oxidation catalyst provides a convincing example of a new structural model to catalyze water oxidation based on the design concept of the oxygen evolving complex (OEC) in photosystem II (PS II). The turnover number of the cobalt(II)-based cubane catalyst can reach as high as 1436, which is currently the highest among bioinspired catalysts with cubical core.

  9. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Review
    8. Highlight
    9. Communications
    10. Full Papers
    1. Activation Effect of Fullerene C60 on the Carbon Dioxide Absorption Performance of Amine-Rich Polypropylenimine Dendrimers (pages 2635–2644)

      Dr. Enrico Andreoli  and Prof. Andrew R. Barron 

      Article first published online: 24 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500605

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Favoring accessibility: The addition of fullerene C60 to polypropylenimine (PPI) dendrimers to form PPI–C60 cross-linked composites results in a reduction of the energy activation barrier of CO2 absorption. This finding supports the existence of a nonaffinity “repulsive” effect between hydrophobic C60 and hydrophilic amines that forces the latter to spread out and be actively exposed to CO2.

    2. Reduced Graphene Oxide Bipolar Membranes for Integrated Solar Water Splitting in Optimal pH (pages 2645–2654)

      Michael B. McDonald, Jared P. Bruce, Kevin McEleney and Prof. Michael S. Freund

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500538

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Let’s split: Reduced graphene oxide is a chemically controllable, electrically conductive catalyst for bipolar membranes in integrated photoelectrochemical water splitting. Membranes that contain graphene oxide are developed and reduced to induce electronic conductivity and maintain a sufficient catalytic activity. Upon optimization, relative overpotentials of <30 % are obtained along with excellent electrical properties, and the catalysts are suited for efficient water splitting.

    3. Synthesis of Cyclic Carbonates from Epoxides and Carbon Dioxide by Using Bifunctional One-Component Phosphorus-Based Organocatalysts (pages 2655–2669)

      Hendrik Büttner, Johannes Steinbauer and Dr. Thomas Werner

      Article first published online: 17 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500612

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      Two heads are better than one! Bifunctional organocatalysts are synthesized and tested in the catalytic reaction of epoxides and carbon dioxide to give the respective cyclic carbonates. Product formation is significantly increased by hydrogen-bond donation from the bifunctional phosphonium catalyst.

    4. Pharmaceuticals and Surfactants from Alga-Derived Feedstock: Amidation of Fatty Acids and Their Derivatives with Amino Alcohols (pages 2670–2680)

      Anastasia Tkacheva, Inkar Dosmagambetova, Yann Chapellier, Dr. Päivi Mäki-Arvela, Imane Hachemi, Dr. Risto Savela, Prof. Dr. Reko Leino, Carolina Viegas, Dr. Narendra Kumar, Dr. Kari Eränen, Jarl Hemming, Dr. Annika Smeds and Dmitry Yu. Murzin

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500526

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      Pores versus acidity: The structures and properties of zeolites and mesoporous materials are investigated as catalysts for the amidation of renewable feedstocks, such as fatty acids, esters, and Chlorella alga based biodiesel, with ethanolamine, alaninol, and leucinol as nitrogen sources.

    5. Controlled Silylation of Nanofibrillated Cellulose in Water: Reinforcement of a Model Polydimethylsiloxane Network (pages 2681–2690)

      Dr. Zheng Zhang, Dr. Philippe Tingaut, Dr. Daniel Rentsch, Dr. Tanja Zimmermann and Dr. Gilles Sèbe

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500525

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      Silylation causing elation: An efficient method for the surface silylation of nanofibrillated cellulose is proposed through an environmentally friendly sol–gel route in water. Under a controlled set of conditions, a highly hydrophobic scaffold of cellulosic fibrils coated by a polysiloxane layer is prepared and used as a reinforcing agent in a model polydimethylsiloxane network.

    6. Hindered Glymes for Graphite-Compatible Electrolytes (pages 2691–2695)

      Devaraj Shanmukaraj, Sylvie Grugeon, Stephane Laruelle and Michel Armand

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500502

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      Hindered glymes: A new electrolyte based on hindered polyether (glyme) solvents has been designed for graphite/LiFePO4 batteries. These electrolytes are safe (high flash point) and environmentally friendly. The most important aspect of using hindered glyme electrolytes with graphite electrodes is the absence of exfoliation of the graphite at both room temperature and higher operating temperature (70 °C) without compromising cycling capacity. The hindered glyme chemistry is rich and can open up new horizons for energy storage.

    7. Screen-Printing of ZnO Nanostructures from Sol–Gel Solutions for Their Application in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 2696–2704)

      Dr. Kuhu Sarkar, Erik V. Braden, Shannon A. Bonke, Prof. Dr. Udo Bach and Prof. Dr. Peter Müller-Buschbaum

      Article first published online: 24 JUN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500450

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      Screen-printed ZnO nanostructures: Simple routes to produce dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) by just printing the commonly used sol–gel system fail and more elaborated approaches are required. The synthesis of metal oxide nanostructures using the diblock copolymer-assisted sol–gel route can be successfully combined with standard printing methods to fabricate DSSCs, in which ZnO nanostructures emerge as a promising alternative to the usually applied TiO2.

    8. Fade to Green: A Biodegradable Stack of Microbial Fuel Cells (pages 2705–2712)

      Dr. Jonathan Winfield, Dr. Lily D. Chambers, Dr. Jonathan Rossiter, Andrew Stinchcombe, Dr.  X. Alexis Walter, Prof. John Greenman and Prof. Ioannis Ieropoulos

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500431

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      Green power: A truly green electronic system should have a green power source such as microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Conventionally, MFCs are built using materials that will have an ecological impact at remote places. We report for the first time a stack of biodegradable MFCs constructed using natural materials for the chassis, electrodes and membranes. Sufficient power is produced to energise real applications. Such systems could biodegrade harmlessly into the environment once their mission is complete.

    9. Cost-Effective Hierarchical Catalysts for Promoting Hydrogen Release from Complex Hydrides (pages 2713–2718)

      Dr. Cheng-Hsien Yang, Chih-Ping Hsu, Prof. Sheng-Long Lee, Prof. Kuan-Wen Wang and Prof. Jeng-Kuei Chang

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500413

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      No pressure, LiAlH4, just release H2: Highly effective Ni/Fe/carbon nanotubes (CNTs) hierarchical catalysts with low cost are constructed using a supercritical CO2-assisted deposition technique. Using 10 wt % of this nanocatalyst, the initial dehydrogenation temperature of LiAlH4 is decreased from ∼135 °C to ∼40 °C. At 100 °C, the catalyzed LiAlH4 takes only ∼0.1 h to release 4.5 wt % hydrogen, which is more than 100 times faster than that required for pristine LiAlH4.

    10. Synthesis of BiVO4@C Core–Shell Structure on Reduced Graphene Oxide with Enhanced Visible-Light Photocatalytic Activity (pages 2719–2726)

      Zhihua Sun, Dr. Chenzhe Li, Prof. Shenmin Zhu, Prof. Maenghyo Cho, Prof. Zhixin Chen, Prof. Kyeongjae Cho, Yongliang Liao, Dr. Chao Yin and Prof. Di Zhang

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500379

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      Core issues: Core–shell BiVO4@C with a controlled particle size is engineered on reduced graphene oxide (RGO) by a new ultrasound-assisted wet chemical method. The bonds formed between the carbon shell and RGO reduce the recombination loss of photogenerated charges effectively, which results in an enhanced performance in photocatalysis. The strategy is simple, effective, and can be extended to other ternary oxides with controlled size and high performance.

    11. Gas Transfer Controls Carbon Limitation During Biomass Production by Marine Microalgae (pages 2727–2736)

      Dr. Bojan Tamburic, Dr. Christian R. Evenhuis, Dr. David J. Suggett, Prof. Anthony W. D. Larkum, Prof. John A. Raven and Prof. Peter J. Ralph

      Article first published online: 21 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500332

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      Just grow it: We present the first in-depth analysis of CO2 limitation on biomass productivity of the marine microalga Nannochloropsis oculata. Net photosynthesis decreases by 60 % over a 12 h light cycle as a direct result of carbon limitation. Continuous dissolved O2 and pH measurements are used to develop a detailed diurnal mechanism for the interaction between photosynthesis, gas exchange and carbonate chemistry in the photo-bioreactor.

    12. Li-Metal-Free Prelithiation of Si-Based Negative Electrodes for Full Li-Ion Batteries (pages 2737–2744)

      Dr. Haitao Zhou, Xuehang Wang and Prof. De Chen

      Article first published online: 20 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500287

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      An aqueous solution: The principle for a Li-metal-free prelithiation method for a binder-free Si-based electrode is presented. This is the first report of the whole process of making a full Li-ion battery with both Li-deficient electrodes (MnOx or S paired with prelithiated Si) from Li-containing aqueous solution without the use of Li metal.

    13. Engineering Transition-Metal-Coated Tungsten Carbides for Efficient and Selective Electrochemical Reduction of CO2 to Methane (pages 2745–2751)

      Sippakorn Wannakao, Dr. Nongnuch Artrith, Prof. Jumras Limtrakul and Prof. Alexie M. Kolpak

      Article first published online: 17 JUL 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500245

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      Finding the right direction: The mechanism of CO2 reduction to CH4 on tungsten carbide (WC) and on WC surfaces doped with transition metal (TM) atoms was investigated. Directional bonding arising from the mixed covalent/metallic character plays a critical role in the surface chemistry. An extended d-band model that can explain both site-preference and binding-energy trends is proposed.

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