ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 8 Issue 4

February 2015

Volume 8, Issue 4

Pages 569–733

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Viewpoint
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Production of Renewable Hexanols from Mechanocatalytically Depolymerized Cellulose by Using Ir-ReOx/SiO2 catalyst (ChemSusChem 4/2015) (page 569)

      Sibao Liu, Yasuyo Okuyama, Dr. Masazumi Tamura, Dr. Yoshinao Nakagawa, Akio Imai and Prof. Keiichi Tomishige

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500071

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The Front Cover image shows that in a biphasic reaction system (n-decane+H2O), high yields of hexanols can be produced from mechanocatalytically depolymerized cellulose by using Ir–ReOx/SiO2 as catalyst, which was developed in our laboratory. Hexanols would be an attractive candidate for biofuels and chemicals that could contribute to the solution of the energy crisis to some extent, such as the stars light up the night sky. In addition, the treatment of cellulose is put into the red tornado. More details can be found in the Full Paper by Liu et al. on page 628 (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403010).

    2. You have free access to this content
      Inside Cover: Superior Ion-Conducting Hybrid Solid Electrolyte for All-Solid-State Batteries (ChemSusChem 4/2015) (page 570)

      Prof. Dr. Jae-Kwang Kim, Prof. Johan Scheers, Prof. Tae Joo Park and Prof. Youngsik Kim

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403348

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The Inside Cover picture shows a hybrid solid electrolyte, which consists of LiTFSI salt, Py14TFSI ionic liquid, and TiO2 nanoparticles. The hybrid solid electrolyte prepared by a facile method has high room temperature ionic conductivity, excellent thermal stability, and low interface resistance with good contact. Moreover, the lithium transference number is increased by the scavenging effect of the nano-TiO2 particles. With the hybrid solid electrolyte, the pouch-type solid-state battery allows high initial discharge capacity of 150 mAh g−1 at room temperature, and even at 1 C, the reversible capacity is as high as 106 mAh g−1. More details can be found in the Full Paper by Kim et al. on page 636 (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402969).

    3. You have free access to this content
      Inside Back Cover: Vectorial Electron Transfer for Improved Hydrogen Evolution by Mercaptopropionic-Acid-Regulated CdSe Quantum-Dots–TiO2–Ni(OH)2 Assembly (ChemSusChem 4/2015) (page 735)

      Dr. Shan Yu, Dr. Zhi-Jun Li, Xiang-Bing Fan, Jia-Xin Li, Fei Zhan, Xu-Bing Li, Prof. Ye Tao, Prof. Chen-Ho Tung and Prof. Li-Zhu Wu

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403349

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The Inside Back Cover shows a simple and efficient ternary assembly, CdSe QDs-TiO2-Ni(OH)2, for H2 evolution under visible light irradiation. The assembly, made by a mercaptopropionic acid, is capable of producing H2 effectively in a basic aqueous solution (pH 11.0). Vectorial electron transfer from CdSe QDs to TiO2 and then to Ni(OH)2 is responsible for the high efficiency. The assembly comprises light antenna CdSe QDs, electron mediator TiO2, and catalytic Ni(OH)2, and mimics the strategy of photosynthesis exploited in nature, taking us a step further towards artificial photosynthesis. More details can be found in the Full Paper by Yu et al. on page 642 (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402885).

    4. You have free access to this content
      Back Cover: Enhanced Performance of Mixed-Matrix Membranes through a Graft Copolymer-Directed Interface and Interaction Tuning Approach (ChemSusChem 4/2015) (page 736)

      Won Seok Chi, Sang Jin Kim, Seung-Joon Lee, Prof. Youn-Sang Bae and Prof. Jong Hak Kim

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403367

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The Back Cover shows a high-performance mixed-matrix membrane (MMM) with simultaneously large improvements in the CO2 permeability by 880 % to 687.7 Barrer and in CO2/N2 selectivity by 14.4 % to 34.9. These MMMs are based on an amphiphilic graft copolymer-directed interface and interaction tuning approach, which maximizes the gas permeation properties of ZIF-8 nanoparticles. This strategy is also applicable to various metal–organic frameworks and other porous materials, implying a versatile approach for the design of MMMs for efficient gas separation. More details can be found in the Full Paper by Chi et al. on page 650 (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402677).

  2. Cover Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Viewpoint
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Production of Renewable Hexanols from Mechanocatalytically Depolymerized Cellulose by Using Ir-ReOx/SiO2 catalyst (page 571)

      Sibao Liu, Yasuyo Okuyama, Dr. Masazumi Tamura, Dr. Yoshinao Nakagawa, Akio Imai and Prof. Keiichi Tomishige

      Article first published online: 5 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500070

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “The challenge is to solve this gap between the temperatures suitable for hydrolysis of cellulose and production of hexanols…” This and more about the story behind the research that inspired the cover image can be found on page 571 (10.1002/cssc.201500070). View the Front Cover on page 569 (10.1002/cssc.201500071).

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Viewpoint
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 4/2015 (pages 572–579)

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201590006

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Viewpoint
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: ChemSusChem 4/2015 (pages 580–581)

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201590007

  5. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Viewpoint
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. Spotlights on our sister journals: ChemSusChem 4/2015 (pages 582–585)

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201580413

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract
  6. Viewpoint

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Viewpoint
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. Across the Board: Jairton Dupont (pages 586–587)

      Prof. Dr. Jairton Dupont 

      Article first published online: 2 DEC 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403276

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      CO2 activation: Our board member Jairton Dupont highlights how the fine-tuning of the electronic and steric properties of ruthenium and rhodium complexes and reaction conditions generates efficient homogeneous transition-metal catalysts for the transformation of CO2 under hydrogen pressure. The catalysts find use in the methylation of amines, amides, and C[BOND]H bonds as well as for the hydroformylation, alkoxycarbonylation, and hydrocarboxylation of alkenes.

  7. Minireview

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Viewpoint
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. Co-Adsorbents: A Key Component in Efficient and Robust Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 588–599)

      Victoria S. Manthou, Dr. Eleftherios K. Pefkianakis, Dr. Polycarpos Falaras and Dr. Georgios C. Vougioukalakis

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403211

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Sensitizers are not enough: The introduction of a co-adsorbent monolayer on the semiconducting photoelectrode of a dye-sensitized solar cell is one of the most important strategies aiming to improve the power conversion efficiency and long-term stability of the device. This Minireview thoroughly discusses all types of co-adsorbents developed thus far, categorized on the basis of the chemical identity of their anchoring group.

  8. Highlight

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Viewpoint
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. Enabling Catalytic Oxidation of Li2O2 at the Liquid–Solid Interface: The Evolution of an Aprotic Li–O2 Battery (pages 600–602)

      Ningning Feng, Prof. Dr. Ping He and Prof. Dr. Haoshen Zhou

      Article first published online: 29 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403338

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Round-trip fare: In comparison with past heterogeneous oxygen evolution reaction catalysts, the incorporation of a suitable soluble redox mediator helps reduce the charging overpotential and improve the round-trip efficiency of an aprotic Li–O2 battery. This Highlight not only explores another new redox couple, 10-methyl-10H-phenothiazine, as a soluble catalyst, but also proposes possible challenges for future improvements in an aprotic Li–O2 battery.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Viewpoint
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. Photocatalytic Carbon Dioxide Reduction with Rhodium-based Catalysts in Solution and Heterogenized within Metal–Organic Frameworks (pages 603–608)

      Dr. Matthew B. Chambers, Xia Wang, Noémie Elgrishi, Dr. Christopher H. Hendon, Dr. Aron Walsh, Jonathan Bonnefoy, Dr. Jérôme Canivet, Dr. Elsje Alessandra Quadrelli, Dr. David Farrusseng, Dr. Caroline Mellot-Draznieks and Prof. Marc Fontecave

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403345

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The rhod ahead: The first photosensitization of a rhodium-based catalytic system for CO2 reduction is reported, with formate as the sole carbon-containing product. Heterogenization of molecular catalysts is accomplished via the synthesis and characterization of a new metal-organic framework (MOF) Cp*Rh@UiO-67. With comparable catalytic activities, the MOF-based system is more stable and selective. Furthermore it can be recycled without loss of activity.

    2. Iron-Catalyzed Hydrogenation of Bicarbonates and Carbon Dioxide to Formates (pages 609–612)

      Fengxiang Zhu, Ling Zhu-Ge, Prof. Dr. Guangfu Yang and Prof. Dr. Shaolin Zhou

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403234

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Carbon dioxide is an attractive C1 source because it is easily and abundantly available, relatively nontoxic, and renewable. An effective, phosphine-free, air- and moisture-tolerant catalyst system based on Knölker's iron complex for the hydrogenation of bicarbonate and carbon dioxide to formate is described. The catalyst system hydrogenates bicarbonate at remarkably low hydrogen pressures.

    3. Tin-containing Silicates: Alkali Salts Improve Methyl Lactate Yield from Sugars (pages 613–617)

      Søren Tolborg, Dr. Irantzu Sádaba, Dr. Christian M. Osmundsen, Dr. Peter Fristrup, Dr. Martin S. Holm and Dr. Esben Taarning

      Article first published online: 21 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403057

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A pretty­ basic­ solution: The presence of alkali metal ions (either in the catalyst or in the medium) in the Sn-Beta zeolite-catalyzed synthesis of methyl lactate from sugars increases the yields, from 30 % to 75 %. The alkali effect is found to apply to Sn-Beta prepared by post-treatment of a dealuminated commercial zeolite as well as for ordered mesoporous Sn-MCM-41 and Sn-SBA-15. The optimization of the catalyst synthesis and reaction conditions leads to increased selectivity to lactic acid derivatives from sugars.

    4. Plasmon-Enhanced Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting Using Au Nanoparticles Decorated on Hematite Nanoflake Arrays (pages 618–622)

      Dr. Lei Wang, Xuemei Zhou, Nhat Truong Nguyen and Prof. Dr. Patrik Schmuki

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403013

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It′s not only gold that sparkles: We form 1D hematite nanoflake arrays that are decorated with plasmonic Au nanoparticles through a simple solution chemistry approach. We find a significant improvement of the solar water splitting performance due to increased light absorption. This can be attributed to the Au nanoparticles that act as plasmonic photosensitizers.

    5. Hollow Mesoporous Carbon Cubes with High Activity towards the Electrocatalytic Reduction of Oxygen (pages 623–627)

      Dr. Lisong Chen, Xiangzhi Cui, Lingxia Zhang, Yongxia Wang, Min Wang, Dr. Fangming Cui, Chenyang Wei, Jingwei Feng, Tongguang Ge, Wenchao Ren and Prof. Jianlin Shi

      Article first published online: 23 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403000

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Burn-in: Hollow-structured mesoporous carbon cubes (HMCCs) are successfully synthesized from carbon dioxide by a method involving thermal reduction of magnesium. During the synthesis, the carbons are doped with pyrrole-type nitrogen species in situ. The samples demonstrate good performance in the electrochemical reduction of oxygen, making them a promising alternative for commercial Pt/C fuel-cell catalysts.

  10. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Masthead
    6. News
    7. Viewpoint
    8. Minireview
    9. Highlight
    10. Communications
    11. Full Papers
    1. Production of Renewable Hexanols from Mechanocatalytically Depolymerized Cellulose by Using Ir-ReOx/SiO2 catalyst (pages 628–635)

      Sibao Liu, Yasuyo Okuyama, Dr. Masazumi Tamura, Dr. Yoshinao Nakagawa, Akio Imai and Prof. Keiichi Tomishige

      Article first published online: 3 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403010

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Let′s talk about hexanol: A high yield of renewable hexanols was obtained from depolymerized cellulose by using Ir-ReOx/SiO2 catalyst in biphasic system (n-decane+H2O). The cellulose is depolymerized by mechanocatalysis with the aid of H2SO4. The influence of solvent amount, reaction temperature, and hydrogen pressure is systematically investigated.

    2. Superior Ion-Conducting Hybrid Solid Electrolyte for All-Solid-State Batteries (pages 636–641)

      Prof. Dr. Jae-Kwang Kim, Prof. Johan Scheers, Prof. Tae Joo Park and Prof. Youngsik Kim

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402969

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Solid-state battery: A hybrid solid electrolyte prepared by novel facile method has high room temperature ionic conductivity, excellent thermal stability, and low interface resistance with good contact. With the hybrid solid electrolyte, the pouch-type solid-state battery exhibits high initial discharge capacity, especially at room temperature.

    3. Vectorial Electron Transfer for Improved Hydrogen Evolution by Mercaptopropionic-Acid-Regulated CdSe Quantum-Dots–TiO2–Ni(OH)2 Assembly (pages 642–649)

      Dr. Shan Yu, Dr. Zhi-Jun Li, Xiang-Bing Fan, Jia-Xin Li, Fei Zhan, Xu-Bing Li, Prof. Ye Tao, Prof. Chen-Ho Tung and Prof. Li-Zhu Wu

      Article first published online: 3 DEC 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402885

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dotty about hydrogen: If mercaptopropionic acid is used as the linker, a turnover frequency of 5140 h−1 based on CdSe quantum dots (QDs) for photocatalytic hydrogen evolution is achieved by a CdSe QDs–TiO2–Ni(OH)2 ternary assembly at pH 11. Vectorial electron transfer from CdSe QDs to TiO2 and then to Ni(OH)2 is crucial for this high efficiency.

    4. Enhanced Performance of Mixed-Matrix Membranes through a Graft Copolymer-Directed Interface and Interaction Tuning Approach (pages 650–658)

      Won Seok Chi, Sang Jin Kim, Seung-Joon Lee, Prof. Youn-Sang Bae and Prof. Jong Hak Kim

      Article first published online: 13 NOV 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402677

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Restricted access: A large improvement in gas permeability and selectivity are simultaneously obtained through an interface and interaction tuning approach based on an amphiphilic poly(vinyl chloride)-g-poly(oxyethylene methacrylate) (PVC-g-POEM). This approach maximizes the gas permeation of zeolite imidazole frameworks-8 (ZIF-8).

    5. Precious-Metal-Free Co–Fe–O/rGO Synergetic Electrocatalysts for Oxygen Evolution Reaction by a Facile Hydrothermal Route (pages 659–664)

      Jing Geng, Long Kuai, Erjie Kan, Qing Wang and Prof. Dr. Baoyou Geng

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403222

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      No bling here! Precious-metal-free Co–Fe–O composites/rGO hybrid structures were obtained by a facile hydrothermal route. They exhibited apparent composition-dependent activity for the electrochemical oxygen evolution reaction. It is found that synergetic effects contribute a significant decrease of overpotential and Tafel slope for composite catalysts.

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Chemo- and Diastereoselectivities in the Electrochemical Reduction of Maleimides (pages 665–671)

      Dr. Kathryn Rix, Prof. Geoffrey H. Kelsall, Prof. Klaus Hellgardt and Dr. King Kuok (Mimi) Hii

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403184

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Reduce with precision: The efficiency and selectivity of the electrochemical reduction of maleimide derivatives are examined in a continuous-flow reactor. The stereoselectivity of the process can be rationalized by using DFT calculations.

    7. Selective Aerobic Oxidation of HMF to 2,5-Diformylfuran on Covalent Triazine Frameworks-Supported Ru Catalysts (pages 672–679)

      Jens Artz, Sabrina Mallmann and Prof. Dr. Regina Palkovits

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403078

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Oxidize and conquer: 5-Hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF) has been oxidized selectively to 2,5-diformylfuran (DFF) using air under mild conditions with Ru supported on covalent triazine frameworks (CTFs) as catalysts. These catalysts result in higher conversions and yields compared to commercially available Ru/C and show superior stability in recycling studies.

    8. Silane Meets Click Chemistry: Towards the Functionalization of Wet Bacterial Cellulose Sheets (pages 680–687)

      Hubert Hettegger, Dr. Ivan Sumerskii, Prof. Salvatore Sortino, Prof. Antje Potthast and Prof. Dr. Thomas Rosenau

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402991

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Right click: Wet bacterial cellulose gels are functionalized for subsequent modification by CuI-catalyzed click chemistry. Bacterial cellulose aquogels are premodified under mild and environmentally friendly conditions by the hydrolysis of an alkoxysilane compound that comprises a terminal azide functionality followed by the covalent grafting of the silanols during rapid thermal treatment.

    9. Very Important Paper

      You have free access to this content
      A Highly Resilient Mesoporous SiOx Lithium Storage Material Engineered by Oil–Water Templating (pages 688–694)

      Eunjun Park, Dr. Min-Sik Park, Jaewoo Lee, Dr. Ki Jae Kim, Dr. Goojin Jeong, Prof. Jung Ho Kim, Dr. Young-Jun Kim and Prof. Hansu Kim

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402907

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      All′s well with oil: Carbon-coated porous SiOx is synthesized by a facile and scalable approach, that is, a sol–gel reaction of hydrogen silsesquioxane together using oil–water templating. A hydrophobic oil is used as both, a pore former inside the SiOx matrix and a precursor for carbon encapsulation on the surface of SiOx. The resulting anode material exhibits a high reversible capacity and outstanding cycling performance over 100 cycles without significant dimensional changes.

    10. Direct C[BOND]H Arene Homocoupling over Gold Nanoparticles Supported on Metal Oxides (pages 695–701)

      Dr. Tamao Ishida, Shohei Aikawa, Yoshiyuki Mise, Ryota Akebi, Dr. Akiyuki Hamasaki, Dr. Tetsuo Honma, Dr. Hironori Ohashi, Dr. Tetsuro Tsuji, Yasushi Yamamoto, Dr. Mitsuru Miyasaka, Prof. Dr. Takushi Yokoyama and Prof. Dr. Makoto Tokunaga

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402822

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Supporting role: Cooperative catalysis by gold nanoparticles and metal oxide supports enables the direct C[BOND]H/C[BOND]H coupling of dimethyl phthalate to give a symmetrical biaryl with excellent regioselectivity. Gold nanoparticles act both as catalytically active species and as bulky ligands, which enables the selective synthesis of symmetrical biaryls. Metal oxides assist the reductive elimination by their redox properties.

    11. Carbon Dioxide Splitting in a Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma: A Combined Experimental and Computational Study (pages 702–716)

      Dr. Robby Aerts, Wesley Somers and Prof. Dr. Annemie Bogaerts

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402818

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Split it: Plasma technology is gaining increasing interest for the splitting of CO2 into CO and O2. However, only some scattered results on pure CO2 splitting have been reported. We present an in-depth study of the conversion and energy efficiency of CO2 splitting by using a dielectric barrier discharge plasma in a wide range of applied frequencies, electric powers, and gas flow rates and by combining experimental and computational results.

    12. You have free access to this content
      Catalytic Partial Oxidation Coupled with Membrane Purification to Improve Resource and Energy Efficiency in Syngas Production (pages 717–725)

      G. Iaquaniello, A. Salladini, E. Palo and G. Centi

      Article first published online: 8 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402732

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Original syn: Experimentation in a semi-industrial scale unit (20 Nm3 h−1 production) shows that a syngas production scheme based on a pre-reforming stage followed by a membrane for hydrogen separation, a catalytic partial oxidation step, and a further step of syngas purification by membrane allows the oxygen-to-carbon ratio to be decreased while maintaining levels of feed conversion, realizing a more sustainable and economic process for syngas production.

    13. Fe3W3C/WC/Graphitic Carbon Ternary Nanojunction Hybrids for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 726–733)

      Dr. Yongping Liao, Prof. Ying Xie, Prof. Kai Pan, Prof. Guofeng Wang, Prof. Qingjiang Pan, Prof. Wei Zhou, Prof. Lei Wang, Prof. Baojiang Jiang and Prof. Honggang Fu

      Article first published online: 7 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402654

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Easing photoelectron traffic! Because the addition of Fe3W3C with more catalytic metallic atoms provides more catalytic active sites, and the formation of ternary nanojunction provides fast photoelectron transfer, dye-sensitized solar cells based on Fe3W3C/WC/graphitic carbon ternary nanojunction hybrids yield photoelectrical conversion efficiencies that are comparable to those of Pt-based DSSCs.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION