ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 8 Issue 9

May 11, 2015

Volume 8, Issue 9

Pages 1495–1626

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Titania-Supported Catalysts for Levulinic Acid Hydrogenation: Influence of Support and its Impact on γ-Valerolactone Yield (ChemSusChem 9/2015) (page 1495)

      Dr. A. M. Ruppert, Dr. J. Grams, Dr. M. Jędrzejczyk , J. Matras-Michalska, Dr. N. Keller, K. Ostojska and Dr. P. Sautet

      Article first published online: 4 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500304

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      The Front Cover picture shows that RuO2 is strongly attached to rutile phase of titania, which serves as a support for the Ru catalysts, whereas the anatase form of titania disables the good metal dispersion. This knowledge was applied to the synthesis of a very active catalyst for levulinic acid hydrogenation towards γ-valerolactone. More details on the influence of various morphologies and phases of titania on the catalytic performance in levulinic acid hydrogenation can be found in the Full Paper by Ruppert et al. (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403332).

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      Inside Cover: Structure–Property Relationships: Asymmetric Alkylphenyl-Substituted Anthracene Molecules for Use in Small-Molecule Solar Cells (ChemSusChem 9/2015) (page 1496)

      Dr. Yu Jin Kim, Dr. Eun Soo Ahn, Dr. Sang Hun Jang, Dr. Tae Kyu An, Prof. Soon-Ki Kwon, Prof. Dae Sung Chung, Prof. Yun-Hi Kim and Prof. Chan Eon Park

      Article first published online: 4 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500351

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      The Inside Cover picture illustrates two different crystalline structures in the solar cell devices. It depicts a series of asymmetric small conjugated molecules based on anthracene that were used in a systematic investigation of the structure–property relationships in solar cell devices prepared by using films of these molecules. One has a naphthalene unit and consists of amorphous domains without crystallites, whereas the other has a thiophene linker, which results in a randomly ordered crystalline structure. We focused on how the thiophene spacer influenced the nanoscale crystalline characteristics of the active layers and the resulting device performances. Our results can be used to guide the design and optimization of new high-performance anthracene-based small molecules. More details can be found in the Full Paper by Kim et al. on page 1548 (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402994).

    3. You have free access to this content
      Inside Back Cover: Activation of Ultrathin Films of Hematite for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting via H2 Treatment (ChemSusChem 9/2015) (page 1627)

      Jonathon Moir, Dr. Navid Soheilnia, Dr. Kristine Liao, Dr. Paul O'Brien, Yao Tian, Prof. Kenneth S. Burch and Prof. Geoffrey A. Ozin

      Article first published online: 4 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500342

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      The Inside Back cover picture shows ultrathin films of α-Fe2O3 before and after treatment in 5 % H2 in Ar at 450 °C. The hydrogen treatment creates oxygen vacancies in the iron oxide lattice, resulting in a non-stoichiometric hematite phase that is active for photoelectrochemical water oxidation. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy reveals the buildup of a surface state capacitance that is only present for the hydrogen treated films when under illumination, at the point of photocurrent onset. A concomitant decrease in charge trapping resistance suggests that this is due to a build-up of photogenerated holes at the surface of the H2-treated films, which allows the water oxidation reaction to proceed. More details can be found in the Full Paper by Moir et al. on page 1557 (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402945).

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      Back Cover: Photoelectrochemical Water Oxidation Efficiency of a Core/Shell Array Photoanode Enhanced by a Dual Suppression Strategy (ChemSusChem 9/2015) (page 1628)

      Wanhong He, Dr. Ye Yang, Liren Wang, Junjiao Yang, Prof. Xu Xiang, Prof. Dongpeng Yan and Prof. Feng Li

      Article first published online: 4 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500418

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      The Back Cover picture shows a core/shell array photoanode and its application in photoelectrochemical water oxidation. The photoanode consists of a TiO2 nanorod array (core) and ultrathin phosphated double-hydroxide (shell), which results in significantly improved photogenerated carrier separation. Nearly 100 % oxidative efficiency for PEC water oxidation was achieved. In addition, the hydroxide sheath could efficiently inhibit the oxygen reduction reaction. This strategy enables the simultaneous suppression of surface carrier recombination and back reactions, which is promising to enhance the water oxidation efficiency of the currently prevailing photoanodes. More details can be found in the Full Paper by He et al. on page 1568 (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403294).

  2. Cover Profile

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Titania-Supported Catalysts for Levulinic Acid Hydrogenation: Influence of Support and its Impact on γ-Valerolactone Yield (page 1497)

      Dr. A. M. Ruppert, Dr. J. Grams, Dr. M. Jędrzejczyk , J. Matras-Michalska, Dr. N. Keller, K. Ostojska and Dr. P. Sautet

      Article first published online: 4 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500305

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      “By combining the strength of collaborative groups in different research fields, we were able to develop innovative tailored catalysts for biomass valorization….” This and more about the story behind the research that inspired the cover image is presented in the Cover Profile. More details can be found in the Full Paper by Ruppert et al.: 10.1002/cssc.201403332. View the Front Cover here: 10.1002/cssc.201500304.

  3. Graphical Abstract

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Graphical Abstract: ChemSusChem 9/2015 (pages 1498–1503)

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201590016

  4. Corrigendum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
  5. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: ChemSusChem 9/2015 (pages 1504–1505)

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201590017

  6. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
  7. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    1. Carbonaceous Materials and Their Advances as a Counter Electrode in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Challenges and Prospects (pages 1510–1533)

      Mojgan Kouhnavard, Dr. Norasikin Ahmad Ludin, Babak V. Ghaffari, Prof. Dr. Kamarozzaman Sopian and Prof. Dr. Shoichiro Ikeda

      Article first published online: 29 APR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500004

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      C the possibilities: This paper is a review of the implementation of various carbonaceous materials as counter electrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). All kinds of carbonaceous materials are considered, including graphite, graphene, activated carbon, and carbon nanotubes. Their photovoltaic performance associated with either their catalytic properties or their surface morphology is examined.

  8. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    1. One-step Conversion of Furfural into 2-Methyltetrahydrofuran under Mild Conditions (pages 1534–1537)

      Dr. Fang Dong, Prof. Yulei Zhu, Dr. Guoqiang Ding, Dr. Jinglei Cui, Xianqing Li and Prof. Yongwang Li

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500178

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      Furfural in bed with two catalysts: One-step conversion of biomass-derived furfural to 2-methyltetrahydrofuran (2-MTHF) is realized over dual solid catalysts based on two-stage-packed Cu–Pd in a reactor. 2-MTHF yield is as high as 97.1 % at atmospheric pressure and 180 °C, which is the highest value reported so far. This strategy provides a successive hydrogenation by avoiding high H2 pressure, using the reactor efficiently, and eliminating the product-separation step.

  9. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profile
    4. Graphical Abstract
    5. Corrigendum
    6. Masthead
    7. News
    8. Review
    9. Communication
    10. Full Papers
    1. Titania-Supported Catalysts for Levulinic Acid Hydrogenation: Influence of Support and its Impact on γ-Valerolactone Yield (pages 1538–1547)

      Dr. A. M. Ruppert, Dr. J. Grams, Dr. M. Jędrzejczyk , J. Matras-Michalska, Dr. N. Keller, K. Ostojska and Dr. P. Sautet

      Article first published online: 14 JAN 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403332

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      What lies beneath: A number of different titanias are implemented as supports for Ru and Pt catalysts. It is shown that various morphologies and phases of titania influence the physicochemical properties of the studied catalysts in different ways. The best catalytic performance in levulinic acid hydrogenation is achieved in the case of mixed rutile/anatase-supported ruthenium catalyst.

    2. Structure–Property Relationships: Asymmetric Alkylphenyl-Substituted Anthracene Molecules for Use in Small-Molecule Solar Cells (pages 1548–1556)

      Dr. Yu Jin Kim, Dr. Eun Soo Ahn, Dr. Sang Hun Jang, Dr. Tae Kyu An, Prof. Soon-Ki Kwon, Prof. Dae Sung Chung, Prof. Yun-Hi Kim and Prof. Chan Eon Park

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402994

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      Need for space: The nature of thiophene in asymmetric anthracene-based small molecules is determined, and its effect on the crystallization behavior and formation of crystalline domains in the solid state are investigated. The crystalline nature of these small molecules is correlated with the properties of the resulting solar cell device.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Activation of Ultrathin Films of Hematite for Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting via H2 Treatment (pages 1557–1567)

      Jonathon Moir, Dr. Navid Soheilnia, Dr. Kristine Liao, Dr. Paul O'Brien, Yao Tian, Prof. Kenneth S. Burch and Prof. Geoffrey A. Ozin

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402945

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Positively illuminating: Treatment of ultrathin films of hematite with H2 results in a photocurrent onset at approximately 1.1 V. By using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, this photocurrent can be correlated with a buildup of a positively charged species at the surface of the hematite film, which is only present under illumination and after H2 treatment.

    4. Photoelectrochemical Water Oxidation Efficiency of a Core/Shell Array Photoanode Enhanced by a Dual Suppression Strategy (pages 1568–1576)

      Wanhong He, Dr. Ye Yang, Liren Wang, Junjiao Yang, Prof. Xu Xiang, Prof. Dongpeng Yan and Prof. Feng Li

      Article first published online: 25 FEB 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403294

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      You need to wear a coat! A core/shell array photoanode with an ultrathin overlayer is obtained by a photoassisted modification and deposition (PMD) strategy, which results in the simultaneous suppression of surface carrier recombination and back reactions during photoelectrochemical water oxidation.

    5. Understanding Cellulose Dissolution: Energetics of Interactions of Ionic Liquids and Cellobiose Revealed by Solution Microcalorimetry (pages 1577–1584)

      Heitor Fernando Nunes de Oliveira and Dr. Roberto Rinaldi

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500272

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      Feel the heat! The interactions between fifteen selected ionic liquids (ILs) and cellobiose (CB) are examined by high-precision solution microcalorimetry. We found that there is an excellent correlation between the nature of the results found for the heat of mixing (ΔmixH) of CB in IL or IL/molecular solvent solutions and the solubility behavior of cellulose. This correlation suggests that ΔmixH(CB) offers a good estimate of the enthalpy of dissolution of cellulose even in solvents in which cellulose is insoluble. These findings open up new horizons for unravelling the intricacies of the thermodynamic factors accounting for the spontaneity of cellulose dissolution in ILs or IL/MS solutions.

    6. Catalytic Decarbonylation of Biosourced Substrates (pages 1585–1592)

      Dr. Jérémy Ternel, Dr. Thomas Lebarbé, Prof. Dr. Eric Monflier and Prof. Frédéric Hapiot

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201500214

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      The future for olefins: Ir catalysts are suitable to decarbonylate a wide range of biosourced substrates into linear α-olefins under rather mild conditions. Optimization of the catalytic system leads to very high conversion and selectivity in terminal alkenes, while the catalytic Ir system can be efficiently recycled. The scaling-up of the studied catalytic system has been successfully performed, still affording good conversion and selectivity in terminal olefins.

    7. Photoelectrochemical Reaction for the Efficient Production of Hydrogen and High-Value-Added Oxidation Reagents (pages 1593–1600)

      Dr. Kojiro Fuku, Nini Wang, Dr. Yugo Miseki, Dr. Takashi Funaki and Dr. Kazuhiro Sayama

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403463

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      What value! Various high-value-added oxidation products such as O2, S2O82−, Ce4+, and IO4 are effectively produced and accumulated by using a porous and thick WO3 photoelectrode. A high solar energy conversion efficiency (applied bias photon-to-current efficiency: 2.2 %) is achieved in the production of H2 and S2O82−.

    8. In Situ Catalytic Hydrogenation of Biomass-Derived Methyl Levulinate to γ-Valerolactone in Methanol (pages 1601–1607)

      Xing Tang, Zheng Li, Prof. Xianhai Zeng, Yetao Jiang, Prof. Shijie Liu, Dr. Tingzhou Lei, Prof. Yong Sun and Prof. Lu Lin

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403392

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      Two-faced copper: Methyl levulinate (ML) in the methanolysis products of cellulose is hydrogenated directly to γ-valerolactone (GVL) with methanol as the in situ hydrogen source over a nanocopper catalyst. The nanocopper catalyst plays a dual role in hydrogen production by methanol reforming and the subsequent hydrogenation of ML to GVL.

    9. Protic-Salt-Derived Nitrogen/Sulfur-Codoped Mesoporous Carbon for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction and Supercapacitors (pages 1608–1617)

      Dr. Shiguo Zhang, Ai Ikoma, Dr. Kazuhide Ueno, Dr. Zhengjian Chen, Prof. Kaoru Dokko and Prof. Masayoshi Watanabe

      Article first published online: 8 APR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201403320

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      Double doping trouble: A protic salt is explored as a single precursor for the preparation of nitrogen/sulfur-co-doped mesoporous carbon through a hard-templating method. This carbon has a high carbon yield, large surface area, large mesopores, narrow pore-size distribution, and high nitrogen content, and as such it has potential applications as a metal-free electrocatalyst in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and as an electrode material in supercapacitors.

    10. [n]-Oligourea-Based Green Sorbents with Enhanced CO2 Sorption Capacity (pages 1618–1626)

      Dr. Abdussalam K. Qaroush, Dr. Dante A. Castillo-Molina, Dr. Carsten Troll, Dr. Malyuba A. Abu-Daabes, Dr. Hatem M. Alsyouri, Prof. Dr. Adnan S. Abu-Surrah and Prof. Dr. Bernhard Rieger

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2015 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201402828

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      An absorbing sorbent: A new series of [n]-oligoureas ([n]-OUs, n=4, 7, 10, and 12) green solid sorbents is prepared following a base-catalyzed, microwave-assisted oligomerization reaction. The reversible character of the CO2-capturing [n]-OU-based green sorbents is shown by performing sorption (35.0 °C) and activation/desorption (60.0 °C, in vacuo) experiments.

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