ChemSusChem

Cover image for Vol. 9 Issue 14

July 21, 2016

Volume 9, Issue 14

Pages 1744–1897

  1. Cover Pictures

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profiles
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cover Picture: Optimization of Norbornadiene Compounds for Solar Thermal Storage by First-Principles Calculations (ChemSusChem 14/2016) (page 1744)

      Dr. Mikael Kuisma, Dr. Angelica Lundin, Prof. Kasper Moth-Poulsen, Prof. Per Hyldgaard and Prof. Paul Erhart

      Version of Record online: 15 JUL 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201600883

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The Cover picture shows promising candidates from the norbornadiene-quadricyclane system for the harvesting of solar energy. This represents a crucial component in current and future energy systems. Variations in supply and demand of solar power require complementary storage technologies that can be employed for load leveling purposes. In this regard, solar thermal storage systems play an important role. While current storage technologies are usually based on heating of water or liquid salt solutions, molecular solar thermal storage (MOST) systems, which rely on a photon-induced switch of isomerization, provide an interesting alternative with several advantages. The challenge though is to identify and tune molecular compounds such that they satisfy key selection criteria such as good solar spectrum match, high storage density, long term thermal stability, and high photo-isomerization efficiency. More details on the investigation of 64 candidate using a computational approach can be found in the Full Paper by Kuisma et al. on page 1786 in Issue 14, 2016 (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201600281).

  2. Cover Profiles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profiles
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Optimization of Norbornadiene Compounds for Solar Thermal Storage by First-Principles Calculations (page 1745)

      Dr. Mikael Kuisma, Dr. Angelica Lundin, Prof. Kasper Moth-Poulsen, Prof. Per Hyldgaard and Prof. Paul Erhart

      Version of Record online: 15 JUL 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201600882

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      “We were intrigued by the lack of good grid solar energy storage solutions…” This and more about the story behind the research that inspired the Cover image is presented in the Cover Profile. Read the full text of the corresponding research at 10.1002/cssc.201600281. View the Front Cover here: 10.1002/cssc.201600883.

  3. News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profiles
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
  4. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profiles
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Selective Deoxygenation of Biomass-Derived Bio-oils within Hydrogen-Modest Environments: A Review and New Insights (pages 1750–1772)

      Kyle A. Rogers and Prof. Ying Zheng

      Version of Record online: 7 JUL 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201600144

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Just a little modest: The development of processes to refine bio-oils is becoming increasingly popular. One issue facing these processes is their requirement for H2 gas. Thus, catalysts that are able to perform selective deoxygenation and thereby minimize H2 consumption are required. This review provides a summary of recent research developments and insights into the development of catalytic materials for selective deoxygenation reactions.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profiles
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Olefin Epoxidation in Aqueous Phase Using Ionic-Liquid Catalysts (pages 1773–1776)

      Dr. Mirza Cokoja, Robert M. Reich, Dr. Michael E. Wilhelm, Dr. Marlene Kaposi, Johannes Schäffer, Danny S. Morris, Dr. Christian J. Münchmeyer, Dr. Michael H. Anthofer, Dr. Iulius I. E. Markovits, Prof. Dr. Fritz E. Kühn, Prof. Dr. Wolfgang A. Herrmann, Prof. Dr. Andreas Jess and Prof. Dr. Jason B. Love

      Version of Record online: 24 MAY 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201600373

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Right combination: Imidazolium perrhenate ionic liquids (ILs) are effective catalysts for the epoxidation of unfunctionalized olefins using hydrogen peroxide as oxidant. The catalytic activity strongly depends on the IL solubility in aqueous H2O2, which is regulated by the nature of the cation. The IL catalysts significantly enhance the solubility of olefins into the aqueous phase, allowing for the reaction to take phase in water.

    2. By-Product Carrying Humidified Hydrogen: An Underestimated Issue in the Hydrolysis of Sodium Borohydride (pages 1777–1780)

      Eddy Petit, Prof. Philippe Miele and Prof. Umit B. Demirci

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201600425

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Beware of contamination: Hydrogen generated by catalyzed hydrolysis of sodium borohydride is not pure. Borate by-products pollute the stream as well as the vessel. Without an efficient filtration system, the evolving borates will cause serious technical issues to a scaled-up storage devices as well as fuel cells (e.g., blocked channels, and precipitation onto electrode and electrocatalyst).

    3. Batch and Flow Synthesis of Disulfides by Visible-Light-Induced TiO2 Photocatalysis (pages 1781–1785)

      Cecilia Bottecchia, Dr. Nico Erdmann, Patricia M. A. Tijssen, Dr. Lech-Gustav Milroy, Prof. Dr. Luc Brunsveld, Prof. Dr. Volker Hessel and Dr. Timothy Noël

      Version of Record online: 22 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201600602

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      S−S without the mess! A mild and practical method for the preparation of disulfides through visible-light-induced photocatalytic aerobic oxidation of thiols is described. The method involves the use of TiO2 as a heterogeneous photocatalyst, which provides high stability and recyclability. The batch and flow protocol can be applied to a diverse set of thiol substrates for the preparation of homo- and hetero-dimerized disulfides and can be used for peptide modification.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Pictures
    3. Cover Profiles
    4. News
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    1. Very Important Paper

      Optimization of Norbornadiene Compounds for Solar Thermal Storage by First-Principles Calculations (pages 1786–1794)

      Dr. Mikael Kuisma, Dr. Angelica Lundin, Prof. Kasper Moth-Poulsen, Prof. Per Hyldgaard and Prof. Paul Erhart

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201600281

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Finding the balance: Electronic structure calculations are employed to determine strategies and identify substituents that can enhance the performance of norbornadiene-based molecular solar thermal storage systems. Focusing on solar spectrum match and storage density, the properties of 64 compounds are scanned. The champion compounds can achieve high storage densities and very good solar thermal match with the prospect of mid- to long-term thermal stability.

    2. The Nature and Impact of Side Reactions in Glyme-based Sodium–Oxygen Batteries (pages 1795–1803)

      Robert Black, Abhinandan Shyamsunder, Parvin Adeli, Dr. Dipan Kundu, Prof. Graham K. Murphy and Prof. Linda F. Nazar

      Version of Record online: 6 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201600034

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Looking sideways: Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of the degradation products of glyme-based electrolytes is used to investigate the inefficient cell performance of Na–O2 batteries. Two pathways for their formation of side-products are proposed, which could have implications in the search for more stable electrolytes.

    3. Association and Diffusion of Li+ in Carboxymethylcellulose Solutions for Environmentally Friendly Li-ion Batteries (pages 1804–1813)

      Dr. Mosè Casalegno, Dr. Franca Castiglione, Dr. Marco Passarello, Prof. Dr. Andrea Mele, Prof. Dr. Stefano Passerini and Prof. Dr. Guido Raos

      Version of Record online: 2 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201600160

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Aqueous lithium-ion batteries are receiving attention because they promise to combine high energy and environmental friendliness. This requires, among other things, the development of aqueous electrolytes. In this manuscript, the Li+ cation coordination and dynamics in gel-like electrolytes made with Li-carboxymethylcellulose are investigated by NMR and molecular dynamics simulations.

    4. Renewable Gasoline, Solvents, and Fuel Additives from 2,3-Butanediol (pages 1814–1819)

      Benjamin G. Harvey, Walter W. Merriman and Roxanne L. Quintana

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201600225

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Renewable and versatile dioxolanes. Bio-based 2,3-butanediol is efficiently converted to a mixture of alkyl dioxolanes (TMED) with a heterogeneous acid catalyst in a solvent-free process. TMED exhibits a net heat of combustion 34 % higher than ethanol, an anti-knock oindex comparable to premium gasoline, and low solubility in water (0.8 g per 100 mL). TMED has potential applications as a gasoline-range fuel, diesel fuel oxygenate, and industrial solvent.

    5. Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes as a Catalyst for Gas-Phase Oxidation of Ethanol to Acetaldehyde (pages 1820–1826)

      Dr. Jia Wang, Dr. Rui Huang, Dr. Zhenbao Feng, Prof. Hongyang Liu and Prof. Dr. Dangsheng Su

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201600234

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Catalytic enhancement: Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are used as a green catalyst to convert ethanol into acetaldehyde in the presence of molecular oxygen. The transformation of carbon debris into more ordered graphitic structures significantly enhances the stability of the active C=O groups generated in the reaction process, improving the catalytic performance of the CNTs.

    6. A Comparative Study on the Reactivity of Various Ketohexoses to Furanics in Methanol (pages 1827–1834)

      Dr. Robert-Jan van Putten, Dr. Jan C. van der Waal, Martin Harmse, Henk H. van de Bovenkamp, Dr. Ed de Jong and Prof. Dr. Hero J. Heeres

      Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201600252

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dehydration delight: To better understand the acid-catalyzed dehydration of sugars to furanics, the dehydration of the four ketohexoses to furanics is studied in methanol. Significant differences in the reactivities of the hexoses are observed. The reactivities and selectivities to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural and 5-methoxymethylfurfural are related to the structural differences between the sugars.

    7. Graphitic Mesoporous Carbon Loaded with Iron–Nickel Hydroxide for Superior Oxygen Evolution Reactivity (pages 1835–1842)

      Ling Wang, Dr. Xiaolei Huang and Dr. Junmin Xue

      Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201600323

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Run GMC vs. Iron Maiden and Nickelback! Graphitic mesoporous carbon (GMC) was prepared and loaded with Fe–Ni hydroxide to fabricate a catalyst for the oxygen evolution reaction (OER). The catalyst showed excellent stability after 2000 cycles and good OER activity with an overpotential of 320 mV at a current density of 10 mA cm−2 and a low Tafel slope of 57 mV dec−1.

    8. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A High-Voltage and High-Capacity Li1+xNi0.5Mn1.5O4 Cathode Material: From Synthesis to Full Lithium-Ion Cells (pages 1843–1849)

      Dr. Marilena Mancini, Dr. Peter Axmann, Giulio Gabrielli, Dr. Michael Kinyanjui, Prof. Dr. Ute Kaiser and Dr. Margret Wohlfahrt-Mehrens

      Version of Record online: 6 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201600365

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cathode to joy: Co-free, Li-rich Li1+xNi0.5Mn1.5O4 (0<x<1) compounds with tailored morphologies and high densities are prepared chemically and tested as high-voltage and highcapacity cathode materials for Li-ion batteries. Their excellent performance in half-cells allows the exploration of the feasibility of practical applications in full cells. The Li1.5Ni0.5Mn1.5O4 cathode versus a graphite anode shows very promising cycling stability.

    9. Visible-Light-Driven Photoelectrochemical and Photocatalytic Performance of NaNbO3/Ag2S Core–Shell Heterostructures (pages 1850–1858)

      Sandeep Kumar, Dr. Aadesh P Singh, Dr. Chandan Bera, Prof. Meganathan Thirumal, Prof. B. R. Mehta and Prof. Ashok K. Ganguli

      Version of Record online: 13 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201600397

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Shining light on a shell: Visible-light-active NaNbO3/Ag2S core–shell semiconductor heterostructures exhibit excellent photoelectrochemical activity toward water splitting and the degradation of a model pollutant (methylene blue). The core/shell heterostructure significantly enhances visible-light absorption and improves the photoelectrochemical performance. The heterostructures are shown to be an efficient, stable, and recyclable photocatalysts.

    10. Poly(ethylenimine)-Functionalized Monolithic Alumina Honeycomb Adsorbents for CO2 Capture from Air (pages 1859–1868)

      Dr. Miles A. Sakwa-Novak, Chun-Jae Yoo, Dr. Shuai Tan, Dr. Fereshteh Rashidi and Prof. Christopher W. Jones

      Version of Record online: 15 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201600404

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Clean air powder: Amine-functionalized honeycomb monoliths are prepared, characterized, and compared to similar powder sorbents for their application in the removal of CO2 from air. The monoliths have a volumetric capacity that exceeds that of a sorbent considered in a previous modeling study. CO2 extraction directly from air with chemicals could have operating costs as low as $100 per ton, which thus asserts the promise of this technology in CO2 extraction directly from air with chemicals.

    11. A Visible-Light-Active Heterojunction with Enhanced Photocatalytic Hydrogen Generation (pages 1869–1879)

      Shiba P. Adhikari, Zachary D. Hood, Dr. Karren L. More, Dr. Vincent W. Chen and Prof. Abdou Lachgar

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201600424

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      I can see the light! A visible-light-active carbon nitride/strontium pyroniobate heterojunction was fabricated and evaluated for its photocatalytic reduction of water to hydrogen under visible light irradiation. The heterojunction photocatalyst extends the light absorption range and restricts photogenerated charge-carrier recombination, resulting in enhanced photocatalytic activity compared to carbon nitride.

    12. A Green Approach to High-Performance Supercapacitor Electrodes: The Chemical Activation of Hydrochar with Potassium Bicarbonate (pages 1880–1888)

      Dr. Marta Sevilla and Prof. Antonio B. Fuertes

      Version of Record online: 7 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201600426

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      K-OK: A green approach for the production of high-performance energystorage materials based on the activation of hydrochar with potassium bicarbonate is implemented successfully, leading to a supercapacitor performance that can compete with, and even surpass, that of KOH-activated hydrochar in a variety of electrolytes.

    13. Understanding the Interactions of CO2 with Doped and Undoped SrTiO3 (pages 1889–1897)

      Qiyuan Wu, Jiajie Cen, Kenneth R Goodman, Prof. Michael G. White, Dr. Girish Ramakrishnan and Prof. Alexander Orlov

      Version of Record online: 17 JUN 2016 | DOI: 10.1002/cssc.201600498

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Performance enhancing dope! Undoped and Rh-doped SrTiO3 were synthesized by two different methods and fully characterized to establish a relationship between the preparation methods and the electronic and structural properties of the materials. The presence of dopants and oxygen vacancies substantially influenced the CO2 interactions with the surface, as revealed by an in situ infrared spectroscopic study.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION