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Atomic Layer Deposition of Copper Oxide using Copper(II) Acetylacetonate and Ozone

Authors

  • Mari Endresen Alnes,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Chemistry, Center for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)
    • Department of Chemistry, Center for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway).
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  • Edouard Monakhov,

    1. Department of Physics, Center for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)
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  • Helmer Fjellvåg,

    1. Department of Chemistry, Center for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)
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  • Ola Nilsen

    1. Department of Chemistry, Center for Materials Science and Nanotechnology, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1048 Blindern, N-0316 Oslo (Norway)
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  • This work is part of the project “Conducting Oxides and Nanostructures for Energy technology (CONE)” funded by the Norwegian research council through the NanoMat program. The authors are grateful to Dr. Martin F. Sundig at the University of Oslo for performing XPS measurements and Dr. Karina B. Klepper at the University of Oslo for performing AFM measurements.

Abstract

We report on the deposition of copper oxide by atomic layer deposition (ALD) using copper acetylacetonate (Cu(acac)2) and ozone (O3) as precursors. The aim is to deposit oxides of copper as possible candidates for materials in all-oxide photovoltaics. The present study results in ALD-type deposition of the tenorite phase of copper(II) oxide in a temperature window of 150 °C to ca. 230 °C, with a growth rate of ∼0.038 nm per cycle. The resulting ALD characteristics, with a relatively large ALD window in deposition temperature, should be well suited for combination with additional deposition processes for the formation of complex compounds. The film thickness is studied using X-ray reflectivity (XRR), and phase is determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Surface roughness is studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) is used to investigate the chemical state of the deposited films.

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