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Surface-immobilized Gold Nanoparticles by Organometallic CVD on Amine-terminated Glass Surfaces

Authors

  • Erden Ertorer,

    1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario (Western University) London, ON (Canada)
    2. Biomedical Engineering Program, Faculty of Engineering, University of Western Ontario (Western University) London, ON (Canada)
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  • Jessica C. Avery,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario (Western University) London, ON (Canada)
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  • Laura C. Pavelka,

    1. Department of Chemistry, University of Western Ontario (Western University) London, ON (Canada)
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  • Silvia Mittler

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario (Western University) London, ON (Canada)
    • Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario (Western University) London, ON (Canada)

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  • The authors thank the Western Nanofabrication Facility for their help in the fabrication process and with SEM. The authors also thank Kim Baines for hosting the precursor synthesis in her lab. Hao Jiang, Max Port, Tayirjan Isimjan, Joe Gilroy and Chitra Rangan are acknowledged for their helpful discussions. The NSERC BiopSys Strategic Network is thanked for financial contributions. CFI and the Ontario Innovation Trust are thanked for funding equipment. E.E. thanks the Ontario Graduate Scholarship Program for financial aid. S.M. thanks the Canadian Government for their CRC Program. This article was modified after online publication to correct the order of the authors names in the byline.

Abstract

The growth of surface-immobilized gold nanoparticles with organometallic (OM)CVD on amine-terminated surfaces, utilizing a (trimethylphospine)methylgold ((CH3)3PAuCH3) precursor is described. Samples fabricated using various deposition times are characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Particle stability on the samples is tested by washing and rinsing treatments with various organic solvents. A biotin-streptavidin scheme is applied to demonstrate the biosensing capabilities of the samples. The size, interparticle distance, and shape of the gold nanoparticles demonstrates that OMCVD is a simple, economic, and fast way of fabricating surface-bonded and stable gold nanoparticles. The plasmonic properties, the stability of the particles, and the biotin-streptavidin test show that these OMCVD-grown gold nanoparticles are suitable for reproducible, low noise, and highly sensitive biosensing applications.

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