Chemical Vapor Deposition

Cover image for Chemical Vapor Deposition

November, 2006

Volume 12, Issue 11

Pages 645–699

  1. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Contents
    3. Essay
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    1. Contents: Chem. Vap. Deposition 11/2006 (pages 645–647)

      Article first published online: 16 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200690023

  2. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Contents
    3. Essay
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    1. EUROCVD-15 (pages 649–654)

      C. Vahlas

      Article first published online: 16 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200600010

  3. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Contents
    3. Essay
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    1. Rapid Coating of Through-Porous Substrates by Atomic Layer Deposition (pages 655–658)

      M. Ritala, M. Kemell, M. Lautala, A. Niskanen, M. Leskelä and S. Lindfors

      Article first published online: 16 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200604228

      By forcing the precursors to flow through substrates, ALD can coat through-porous substrates uniformly and with cycle times nearly as short as those for planar surfaces. This reactor design avoids the problem of long cycle times confronted in conventional ALD reactors, where the precursor flow is along the substrate surface and the precursor transportation into the deep pores occurs by diffusion.

  4. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Contents
    3. Essay
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    1. Monitoring of an Interlayer Between Si(100) and a TiO2 Layer Formed During Cyclic CVD (pages 659–664)

      Y. S. Cho, J. S. Heo, J. C. Kim and S. H. Moon

      Article first published online: 16 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200506455

      The growth mechanism of an interlayer (see figure) between an Si(100) substrate and a TiO2 film deposited by cyclic CVD is investigated. The interlayer grows in two sequential steps, i.e., the initial SiOx formation followed by the growth of a TiSiOx layer. The interlayer thickness could be minimized to 8 Å by controlling the O2 dosages in the CVD process.

    2. ALD of Hafnium Dioxide Thin Films Using the New Alkoxide Precursor Hafnium 3-Methyl-3-pentoxide, Hf(mp)4 (pages 665–669)

      W. Cho, K.-S. An, T.-M. Chung, C. G. Kim, B.-S. So, Y.-H. You, J.-H. Hwang, D. Jung and Y. Kim

      Article first published online: 16 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200506458

      The new precursor hafnium 3-methyl-3-pentoxide is shown to have excellent ALD behavior when used with water as the oxygen source. It is a liquid, volatile at moderately elevated temperatures, and shows a relatively low ALD temperature window, 250–350 °C, and minimal carbon incorporation in the HfO2 films deposited. The growth rate of the HfO2 films was found to be ca. 0.9 Å/cycle under optimal reaction conditions.

    3. Cobalt Thin Films Deposited by Photoassisted MOCVD Exhibiting Inverted Magnetic Hysteresis (pages 670–678)

      M. F. Chioncel and P. W. Haycock

      Article first published online: 16 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606486

      Cobalt films are deposited onto glass by photoassisted MOCVD, above and below the decomposition temperature of the precursor, CpCo(CO)2. Growth-rate data indicate an enhanced activated pyrolytic deposition mechanism above the decomposition temperature and a surface-catalyzed photolytic mechanism at lower temperatures. Most samples show relatively normal magnetic behavior; however, those of thickness less than 70 nm grown at 110 °C exhibit large inverse hysteresis normal to the film plane.

    4. Characterization of Chemical Vapor Deposited Copper Films on Mercaptan Self-Assembled Monolayer Diffusion Barriers (pages 679–684)

      X. Liu, Q. Wang and S. Wu

      Article first published online: 16 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606488

      The CVD process using copper(II) bis-hexafluoroacetylacetonate [CuII(hfac)2] precursor on 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane (MPTMS) self-assembled monolayers (SAMs)-modified substrate has been investigated. The microstructures and electrical properties of the deposited copper films were characterized by different analysis techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and the four-probe method. It shows that the deposited copper films were uniform, pure, and of low resistivity.

    5. Combinatorial Initiated CVD for Polymeric Thin Films (pages 685–691)

      T. P. Martin and K. K. Gleason

      Article first published online: 16 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606495

      A new combinatorial initiated (i)CVD reactor has been implemented to improve efficiency in the optimization of polymer depositions by iCVD. Activation energies, chemical structure, and molecular weight are characterized for deposition of two polymers from the vapor phase. Results from the combinatorial system are found to correlate very closely to results of performing each deposition separately, confirming the new system's value.

    6. Atmospheric Pressure CVD of Molybdenum Diselenide Films on Glass (pages 692–698)

      N. D. Boscher, C. J. Carmalt, R. G. Palgrave, J. J. Gil-Tomas and I. P. Parkin

      Article first published online: 16 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606502

      Atmospheric pressure chemical vapor deposition (APCVD) of molybdenum diselenide films on glass substrates has been achieved by reaction of diethyl selenide or di-tert-butyl selenide with MoCl5 at 500–650 °C. The obtained thin films show high absorbance in the visible part of the spectrum, but are more transparent in the near-infrared.

  5. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Contents
    3. Essay
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    1. Author Index and Subject Index Chem. Vap. Deposition 11/2006 (page 699)

      Article first published online: 16 NOV 2006 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200690024

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