Chemical Vapor Deposition

Cover image for Vol. 13 Issue 10

October, 2007

Volume 13, Issue 10

Pages 519–581

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Correction
    5. Essay
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index
  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Correction
    5. Essay
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index
    1. Contents: Chem. Vap. Deposition 10/2007 (pages 519–521)

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200790028

  3. Correction

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Correction
    5. Essay
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index
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  4. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Correction
    5. Essay
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index
    1. Citation Network of CVD Research: Research Topics and Journals (pages 523–525)

      Y. Takeda, Y. Kajikawa and K. Matsushima

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200700011

      A citation network of papers on CVD is analyzed to investigate the current research status and position of CVD-related journals. The results reported can guide researchers and engineers to a comprehensive understanding of the state of CVD research.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Correction
    5. Essay
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index
    1. Oriented Bicrystalline GaN Nanowire Arrays suitable for Field Emission Applications (pages 527–532)

      Z. Chen, C. B. Cao and H. S. Zhu

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200604244

      Oriented bicrystalline GaN nanowire arrays are synthesized by a catalytic carbon thermal reduction process. The bicrystalline structure is composed of (001) planes and the twin angle is 124°. Field-emission measurements show that the oriented bicrystalline GaN nanowire arrays produce a current density of 10 μA/cm2 at a lower turn-on fields of 8 V/μm. It suggests that the oriented bicrystalline GaN nanowire capped with catalyst particle arrays can serve as a promising candidate for field emission emitters.

    2. Large Area Growth of Aligned CNT Arrays on Spheres: Towards Large Scale and Continuous Production (pages 533–536)

      R. Xiang, G. H. Luo, W. Z. Qian, Y. Wang, F. Wei and Q. Li

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200704249

      A novel strategy for the large scale, continuous production of aligned carbon nanotube arrays using millimeter-diameter spheres as growth substrates is reported (see figure and cover). The present technique is more productive than the conventional process on flat wafers because of the higher available growth surface and the good fluidity of the spherical substrates. It can be adapted for the industrial production and application of aligned carbon nanotube arrays with lengths of up to one millimeter.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Correction
    5. Essay
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index
    1. Influence of Growth Temperature and Carrier Flux on the Structure and Transport Properties of Highly Oriented CrO2 on Al2O3 (0001) (pages 537–545)

      P. M. Sousa, S. A. Dias, O. Conde, A. J. Silvestre, W. R. Branford, B. Morris, K. A. Yates and L. F. Cohen

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200706592

      This work reports on the structure and magnetic and electrical transport properties of CrO2 films deposited onto (0001) sapphire by atmospheric pressure CVD from CrO3 precursor. Films were grown within a broad range of deposition temperatures from 320 to 410 °C, and oxygen carrier gas flow rates of 50–500 sccm. The growth of a Cr2O3 interfacial layer as an intrinsic feature of the deposition process is studied and discussed. Films synthesized at 330 °C retain the high quality magnetic and transport properties of those deposited at higher temperatures.

    2. Atomic Layer Deposition of Gadolinium Oxide Films (pages 546–552)

      K. Kukli, T. Hatanpää, M. Ritala and M. Leskelä

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200706631

      Thin cubic Gd2O3 films are grown by atomic layer deposition using a noveltris(2,3-dimethyl-2-butoxy)gadolinium(III) precursor, Gd[OC(CH3)2CH(CH3)2]3, and water at temperatures of 300–400 °C. Permittivity of Gd2O3 layers was nearly 16, and breakdown fields reached 8 MV/cm.

    3. Coating of Ceramic SiC, SiBNC, and Al2O3 Fibers with SiBN Using a Continuous CVD Process – Influence of Stoichiometry on Stability against Oxidation and Hydrolysis (pages 553–560)

      S. Stöckel, G. Marx and W. A. Goedel

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200706626

      SiBN coatings are successfully deposited onto ceramic fibres in a continuous atmospheric pressure process at 1050 °C using N,N,N-trimethylborazine, tetramethylsilane and ammonia. Stoichiometry, oxidation behavior and hydrolytic stability are strongly dependent of their silicon content. Annealing at 1400 °C improves oxidation behaviour and hydrolytic stability to such an extend that SiBN might qualify as an interphase for ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) even up to 1100 °C.

    4. Low-Temperature PECVD of Nanodevice-Grade nc-3C-SiC (pages 561–566)

      Q. J. Cheng, S. Y. Xu, J. D. Long and K. Ostrikov

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200706624

      Nanocrystalline 3C-SiC films with a low hydrogen content are successfully fabricated by plasma-based synthesis at substrate temperatures as low as Ts = 250 °C, featuring: i) high nanocrystalline fraction (67 % at 550 °C); ii) good chemical purity; iii) excellent stoichiometry throughout the entire film; iv) a wide optical band gap (3.22–3.71 eV); v) a refractive index close to that of single-crystalline 3C-SiC; and vi) clear, uniform, and defect-free Si/SiC interfaces.

    5. Growth of Dysprosium-, Scandium-, and Hafnium-based Third Generation High-κ Dielectrics by Atomic Vapor Deposition (pages 567–573)

      C. Adelmann, P. Lehnen, S. Van Elshocht, C. Zhao, B. Brijs, A. Franquet, T. Conard, M. Roeckerath, J. Schubert, O. Boissière, C. Lohe and S. De Gendt

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200706604

      Thin dysprosium-, scandium-, and hafnium-based oxide dielectric films are deposited by atomic vapor deposition using Dy(EDMDD)3, Sc(EDMDD)3, and Hf(OtBu)2(mmp)2. Spectroscopic ellipsometry, Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, and X-ray photoemission spectroscopy demonstrate good control of the thickness and composition of the films. In particular, ternary and quaternary oxide alloys of any desired composition can be grown. The crystal structure of the compounds is discussed.

    6. Atmospheric Pressure MOCVD of Thin Fe Films on Carbon Fibers (pages 574–580)

      J.-H. Luo, R.-Y. Luo and W.-G. Zhang

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200706601

      Thin iron films grown on carbon fibers are prepared by atmospheric pressure metal–organic chemical vapor deposition. The film growth and structure, as a function of the deposition temperature, hydrogen gas flow rate, and precursor sublimation rate, are extensively investigated. Based on the measurement and analysis on the deposited films, a general deposition mechanism is proposed.

  7. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Correction
    5. Essay
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index

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