Chemical Vapor Deposition

Cover image for Chemical Vapor Deposition

April, 2007

Volume 13, Issue 4

Pages 135–190

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
  3. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    1. Crystalline, Uniform-Sized TiO2 Nanosphere Films by a Novel Plasma CVD Process at Atmospheric Pressure and Room Temperature (pages 141–144)

      A.-M. Zhu, L.-H. Nie, Q.-H. Wu, X.-L. Zhang, X.-F. Yang, Y. Xu and C. Shi

      Version of Record online: 4 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200604230

      A novel plasma CVD process induced by diffuse coplanar surface discharges (DCSD) for TiO2 film fabrication at atmospheric pressure and room temperature is reported. Using this simple and low-cost process, uniform-sized nanosphere, crystalline TiO2 thin films (see figure) have been successfully fabricated.

  4. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    1. Synthesis and Functional Properties of Vanadium Oxides: V2O3, VO2, and V2O5 Deposited on Glass by Aerosol-Assisted CVD (pages 145–151)

      C. Piccirillo, R. Binions and I. P. Parkin

      Version of Record online: 4 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606540

      Thin films of vanadium oxides are deposited on glass by aerosol-assisted (AA) CVD from vanadium(III) acetylacetonate and vanadyl(IV) acetylacetonate. The vanadium precursor, solvent, and carrier gas-flow rate determine the phase of vanadium oxide formed (V2O3, VO2, or V2O5). Films are characterized using various analytical techniques. VO2 films are analyzed at various temperatures to study their thermochromic behavior. The V2O3 reflectance-transmission plots show a cross-over (ideal behavior for a solar-control mirror).

    2. Radical Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Titanium Dioxide (pages 152–157)

      A. Niskanen, K. Arstila, M. Leskelä and M. Ritala

      Version of Record online: 4 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606546

      Radical enhanced atomic layer deposition (ALD) is used to deposit titanium dioxide from titanium isopropoxide and oxygen radicals between 50 and 300 °C. Film growth in the ALD mode is demonstrated as growth rate saturation and conformal growth are observed. A successful deposition on several substrate materials, including sensitive natural fibers, is seen.

    3. Tungsten-Doped Vanadium Oxides Prepared by Direct Liquid Injection MOCVD (pages 158–162)

      D. Vernardou, M. E. Pemble and D. W. Sheel

      Version of Record online: 4 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606527

      Smart glazing has significant potential for energy saving, with thermochromic films as one of the potential technology approaches. This paper examines the effect of tungsten doping of vanadium(IV) oxide coatings, using atmospheric-pressure, direct liquid injection MOCVD. The relationship between dopant concentration and transition temperature (Tc), in the most applicable range for solar window coatings, is explored by formation of single-phase films and by precise determination of process parameters.

    4. Atomic Layer Deposition of Titanium Disulfide Thin Films (pages 163–168)

      V. Pore, M. Ritala and M. Leskelä

      Version of Record online: 4 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606530

      Titanium disulfide thin films are grown from TiCl4 and H2S by atomic layer deposition. Soda-lime glass, silicon, and thin films of TiN, ZnS, Rh, Ir, Pd, Pt and Ru were used as substrates. Film morphology and stoichiometry depends strongly on the type of substrate used. TiS2 can also be grown on the pore walls of an alumina membrane, with an aspect ratio of 300:1.

    5. A Nonequilibrium, Atmospheric-Pressure Argon Plasma Torch for Deposition of Thin Silicon Dioxide Films (pages 169–175)

      T. P. Kasih, S. Kuroda and H. Kubota

      Version of Record online: 4 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606535

      Deposition of silicon dioxide film from an HMDSO precursor by using a nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma torch based on argon gas has been investigated. Compared to the same deposition based on helium gas, it is found that both of deposition rate and quality of the film is much better. Modification of the visual aspect of the film by admixing a small amount of nitrogen into the argon as a source gas for the discharge has also been described.

    6. Focused Electron Beam Induced Deposition of Si-Based Materials From SiOxCy to Stoichiometric SiO2: Chemical Compositions, Chemical-Etch Rates, and Deep Ultraviolet Optical Transmissions (pages 176–184)

      A. Perentes and P. Hoffmann

      Version of Record online: 4 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606583

      The decomposition by focused-electron-beam-induced deposition in presence of oxygen of three different organosilanes is presented. The deposited materials composition and quality are reported as function of the precise [O2]:[precursor] ratio. Pure and 193 nm wavelength transparent SiO2 is obtained, which opens the way to nano-optical devices, and demonstrates the potential of focused-electron-beam-driven processes for the deposition of pure materials.

    7. CVD of MgO Thin Films from Bis(methylcyclopentadienyl) Magnesium (pages 185–189)

      G. Carta, N. El Habra, L. Crociani, G. Rossetto, P. Zanella, A. Zanella, G. Paolucci, D. Barreca and E. Tondello

      Version of Record online: 4 APR 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606574

      Magnesium oxide thin films are grown by MOCVD in the temperature range 400–550 °C using bis(methylcyclopentadienyl)magnesium as precursor, which yields a high growth rate (up to 50 nm/min at 450 °C). The films, characterized by XRD, XPS and AFM analyses, contain the cubic MgO phase (periclase), with carbon contamination limited to the outermost layers and a granular surface morphology with low roughness values.

  5. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION