Chemical Vapor Deposition

Cover image for Vol. 13 Issue 5

May, 2007

Volume 13, Issue 5

Pages 195–253

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    1. Contents: Chem. Vap. Deposition 5/2007 (pages 195–197)

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200790013

  3. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    1. Thermal and Mechanical Properties of Silicon Tetrachloride (SiCl4) and Germanium Tetrachloride (GeCl4) in Their Vapor and Liquid Phases (pages 199–203)

      O. P. Prat, T. Cloitre and R.-L. Aulombard

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200604242

      The most-common physical properties of the precursor species SiCl4 and GeCl4 in their vapor and liquid phases are compiled from several sources in the literature. General expressions over a large range of temperature are proposed either by the use of referenced expressions or by the use of suitable empirical models.

  4. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    1. Low-Temperature PECVD of Transparent SiOxCyHz Thin Films (pages 205–210)

      D. Barreca, A. Gasparotto, C. Maccato, C. Maragno, E. Tondello and G. Rossetto

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606518

      Hybrid organic–inorganic SiOxCyHz thin films can be prepared on Cu, Si(100), and SiO2 substrates by using plasma-enhanced CVD (PECVD) from tetramethoxysilane under Ar plasmas at temperatures as low as 60 °C. The obtained layers consist of an amorphous silica-like network and present a good adhesion to substrates, sharp interfaces, good hardness, and high spectral transparency. The reported results open up interesting perspectives for the development of antiwear and barrier coatings against oxidation of metallic substrates.

    2. Surface Characterization of Biopolymer Micropatterns Processed by Ion-Beam Modification and PECVD (pages 211–218)

      M. Manso Silván, A. Valsesia, M. Hasiwa, D. Gilliland, G. Ceccone and F. Rossi

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606580

      Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) and allylamine (ALL) have been used to create biomedical micropatterns by exploiting the antifouling character of PEG and the biofunctional properties of ALL films. The PEG film is etched through a mask to subsequently deposit ALL by PECVD in the formed cavities. Imaging-mode X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectroscopy, and the response of cultured fibroblasts corroborate the contrasting PEG vs. ALL chemistry.

    3. CVD of Metals Using Alcohols and Metal Acetylacetonates, Part I: Optimization of Process Parameters and Electrical Characterization of Synthesized Films (pages 219–226)

      P.A. Premkumar, N. Bahlawane and K. Kohse-Höinghaus

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606572

      A new, successful CVD approach is developed for the growth of transition metal films using commercially available metal acetylacetonates and alcohols as the sole solvents and reducing agents. The efficiency of the process with respect to the delivery and the deposition parameters is optimized. Results demonstrate that pure metal films grow on different substrates without any incubation time and do not need any seed layer.

    4. CVD of Metals Using Alcohols and Metal Acetylacetonates, Part II: Role of Solvent and Characterization of Metal Films Made by Pulsed Spray Evaporation CVD (pages 227–231)

      P.A. Premkumar, N. Bahlawane, G. Reiss and K. Kohse-Höinghaus

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606573

      Pulsed spray evaporation CVD using metal acetylacetonates and organic solvents is employed to grow metallic films in a hydrogen-free atmosphere. Alcohol solvents enable the growth of metallic films, while non-alcohol solvents fail to do so. Metal films can be grown from a starting temperature of 493 K. Phase analysis reveals the hexagonal polycrystalline structure of Ni and Co, and the cubic structure of Cu.

    5. MOCVD of BiFeO3 Thin Films on SrTiO3 (pages 232–238)

      J. Thery, C. Dubourdieu, T. Baron, C. Ternon, H. Roussel and F. Pierre

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606571

      The multiferroic compound BiFeO3 is deposited as epitaxial films on (001) SrTiO3 by liquid-injection MOCVD. Fe(tmh)3 is used as the Fe precursor. Two precursors are studied for Bi: Bi(tmhd)3 and Bi(mmp)3. The film composition, crystalline structure, and microstructure are characterized using various techniques. Magnetic properties are also reported. The enhanced magnetization (70 emu/cm3) correlates with the presence of a double Fe2+/Fe3+ valence in the films.

    6. Atomic Layer Deposition of BaTiO3 Thin Films—Effect of Barium Hydroxide Formation (pages 239–246)

      M. Vehkamäki, T. Hatanpää, M. Ritala, M. Leskelä, S. Väyrynen and E. Rauhala

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606538

      Barium titanate thin films are grown with ALD using Ba cyclopentadienyl and Ti alkoxide precursors. The tendency of barium oxide to form Ba(OH)2 can influence the growth of Ba containing ternary oxides. A combination of mixing titanium oxide growth cycles and sufficiently long H2O purge times make self-limiting growth of Ba–Ti–O possible. The as-deposited amorphous films can be crystallized by post-deposition annealing for use in metal–insulator–metal (MIM) capacitors.

    7. Incubation Effects upon Polycrystalline Silicon on Glass Deposited by Hot-Wire CVD (pages 247–252)

      S.-Y. Lien, H.-Y. Mao, B.-R. Wu, R.-H. Horng and D.-S . Wuu

      Article first published online: 11 MAY 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606576

      A growth mechanism diagnosis for high-rate polycrystalline silicon deposition using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition is explored. The effects of deposition parameters on Si film growth were investigated by Raman and transmission electron microscopy, with special attention paid to the crystalline and amorphous phases. The H2/SiH4 ratio and substrate temperature are confirmed to be the key parameters in determining the crystalline phase and the incubation thickness of the as-deposited Si film.

  5. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION