Chemical Vapor Deposition

Cover image for Vol. 13 Issue 8

August, 2007

Volume 13, Issue 8

Pages 375–433

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Obituary
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Obituary
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
  3. Obituary

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Obituary
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    1. Obituary: Professor Liliane G. Hubert-Pfalzgraf (page 379)

      A. C. Jones

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200790021

  4. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Obituary
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    1. Synthesis and Structures of Bis(2-dimethylaminoethyl)amine Adducts of Strontium Bis(2,2,6,6-tetramethylheptane-3,5-dionate) and Their Use in the CVD of Cubic Strontium-Doped Hafnium Dioxides (pages 381–388)

      B. Luo, D. Yu, B. E. Kucera, S. A. Campbell and W. L. Gladfelter 

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606577

      The synthesis and structures of new Sr precursors Sr(tmhd)2-[HN(CH2CH2-NMe2)2](EtOH) (1) and Sr(tmhd)2-[HN(CH2CH2NMe2)2] (2) are reported, along with the first chemical vapor deposition of high-κ dielectric strontium hafnium oxide films using 2 and Hf(OtBu)4. A cubic Sr-stabilized hafnia phase is found for low-Sr doped films, and the dielectric constant of the films increases as the proportion of the cubic phase increases, reaching 25 for the film with a Sr content of 0.07.

    2. Minimizing the Carbon Content of Thin Ruthenium Films by MOCVD Precursor Complex Design and Process Control (pages 389–395)

      A. Schneider, N. Popovska, I. Jipa, B. Atakan, M. A. Siddiqi, R. Siddiqui and U. Zenneck

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606582

      [(Benzene)(1,3-cyclohexadiene)Ru] is investigated as a designed MOCVD precursor where the inherent structural and chemical features of the ligands help the formation of pure ruthenium films without the use of a reactive gas. The investigations are performed in the temperature range 200–450 °C with Si wafers as the substrate and helium as the carrier gas. The optimum conditions are a molar C/Ru ratio of 0.03 at 300 °C and a helium transport gas velocity of 12.6 cm/s.

    3. A Novel Approach to Silicon-Nanowire-Assisted Growth of High-Purity, Single-Crystalline β-Si3N4 Nanowires (pages 396–400)

      J.-J. Niu and J.-N. Wang

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200706593

      Single-crystalline β-Si3N4 nanowires with high purity are successfully synthesized by a simple silicon nanowires (SiNWs)-assisted growth technique. The weak blue-shift of peaks in the Raman scattering compared to bulk β-Si3N4 is attributed to the phonon confinement effect or laser heating. A possible SiNWs-template-assisted growth model for synthesizing high-purity β-Si3N4-NWs is suggested.

    4. Alcohol-Assisted CVD of Silver Using Commercially Available Precursors (pages 401–407)

      N. Bahlawane, P. A. Premkumar, A. Brechling, G. Reiss and K. Kohse-Höinghaus

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200706610

      A novel chemical approach based on the catalytic reactivity of cationic silver, and of silver surfaces with alcohols, can be used to grow silver films by CVD. High-purity silver films are obtained by using either state-of-art precursors or silver salts that have not previously been considered as CVD-precursors.

    5. Radical-Enhanced Atomic Layer Deposition of Silver Thin Films Using Phosphine-Adducted Silver Carboxylates (pages 408–413)

      A. Niskanen, T. Hatanpää, K. Arstila, M. Leskelä and M. Ritala

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606519

      Metallic silver has been deposited by ALD for the first time. The process utilizes an in-house-synthesized silver precursor, (2,2-dimethylpropionato)silver(I)triethylphosphine and hydrogen radicals at a low deposition temperature of 140 °C to deposit conformal, metallic silver films. The films are polycrystalline, visually mirrorlike, and exhibit low resistivities, for example 6 μ Ω cm for a 40 nm thick film.

    6. Study of Magnesium Boride Films Obtained From Mg(BH4)2 by CVD (pages 414–419)

      L. Crociani, G. Rossetto, S. Kaciulis, A. Mezzi, N. El-Habra and V. Palmieri

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606525

      Magnesium boride films have been synthesized from the single-source precursor Mg(BH4)2 by chemical vapor deposition. The prepared samples, analyzed by means of XRD and XPS techniques, are found to be composed of MgBx films covered with overlayers of magnesium and boron oxides.

    7. CVD of Thin Ruby Films on Si(100) and Stainless Steel for Surface Temperature Sensor Applications (pages 420–426)

      C. Pflitsch, D. Viefhaus and B. Atakan

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606564

      A promising approach to measuring surface temperatures is the usage of thermographic phosphors. In the present study, the CVD of chromium-doped aluminum oxide films (ruby) on Si(100) and stainless steel substrates is investigated with respect to this application. Promising Cr+:α-Al2O3 films are grown at temperatures above 1273 K—they show the typical phosphorescence of ruby, with lifetimes of between 2.3 ms at 298 K and 6 μs at 813 K.

    8. Visualization of Vortex Flow Patterns with a Uniformly Perforated Showerhead in a Model Lamp Heat, Single-Wafer Thermal Processor (pages 427–432)

      T. C. Cheng, T. F. Lin, J. Y. Yang and S.-R. Jian

      Version of Record online: 14 AUG 2007 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200606566

      Experimental visualization of vortex flow patterns are investigated using an 8″ RTCVD processor with a uniformly perforated showerhead. This processor permits three basic types of flow patterns: plug flow, buoyancy-induced flow, and mixed flow. The plug flow is most suited for thin-film growth because of its uniform velocity and thermal boundary layers. There are three ways to develop plug flow: increasing the flow rate Q, decreasing the chamber height H, or lowering the chamber pressure P (increasing α and ν).

  5. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Obituary
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index

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