Chemical Vapor Deposition

Cover image for Vol. 14 Issue 9‐10

September/October 2008

Volume 14, Issue 9-10

Pages 271–319

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
  3. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    1. Improving Purity and Size Control of Iron- and Molybdenum-Supported Nanoparticles Prepared by OMCVD from their Carbonyl Precursors (pages 275–278)

      Emmanuel Lamouroux, Massimiliano Corrias, Laurence Ressier, Yolande Kihn, Philippe Serp and Philippe Kalck

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200804265

      Communication: OMCVD using zero-valent metal carbonyl and water vapor is employed to grow Fe and Mo nanoparticles. The introduction of water vapor during deposition enables to limit carbon contamination via surface reactions. The influence of the concentration of hydroxyl groups on the substrate and of the precursor partial pressure on the size of deposited nanoparticles is demonstrated.

  4. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    1. Photothermal CVD of Carbon Thin Films using CH2I2 as the Precursor (pages 279–285)

      Abdul Rashid, Lars Landström, Mikael Ottosson and Klaus Piglmayer

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200806666

      Full Paper: Chemical vapor deposition of carbon thin films from the novel precursor CH2I2 has been performed. Different sources of activation (IR lamp and thermal plate) were used and the process was very sensitive on the overall transport characteristics, determined by the reactor geometries and heated substrate areas. The deposited films were thoroughly characterized by Raman spectroscopy.

    2. PECVD Siloxane and Fluorine-Based Copolymer Thin Films (pages 286–291)

      Hao Jiang, Kurt Eyink, John T. Grant, Jesse Enlow, Scott Tullis and Timothy J. Bunning

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200806684

      Full Paper: HMDSO and OFCB plasma copolymerized films have been fabricated. A nonlinear relationship between the refractive index and extinction coefficient with comonomer feed ratio was observed. Defluorination and formation of a carbon rich network produced a strong initial increase in both n and k. Once substantial amounts of Si[BOND]C and Si[BOND]O bonds were incorporated, the refractive index decreased slowly due to a lowering of the density.

    3. Tribenzyltin(IV)chloride Thiosemicarbazones: Novel Single Source Precursors for Growth of SnS Thin Films (pages 292–295)

      Balasaheb P. Bade, Shivram S. Garje, Yogesh S. Niwate, Mohammad Afzaal and Paul O'Brien

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200806687

      Full Paper: Tin sulfide (SnS) thin films have been deposited by aerosol-assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD) technique using tin thiosemicarbazone complexes of the type Bz3SnCl(L) (L = thiosemicarbazones of salicylaldehye and 4-chlororbenzaldehyde). The deposited films are found to contain orthorhombic SnS and they have wafer like morphology.

    4. An Analysis of the Deposition Mechanisms involved during Self-Limiting Growth of Aluminum Oxide by Pulsed PECVD (pages 296–302)

      Michael T. Seman, David N. Richards, Pieter Rowlette and Colin A. Wolden

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200806701

      Full Paper: The deposition mechanism that occur during pulsed PECVD of alumina was analyzed by comparing growth rate, quality, and conformality with plasma-enhanced ALD. The results suggest that deposition in pulsed PECVD involves an ALD component which is supplemented by PECVD growth, and that the contribution of the latter may be tuned using the TMA partial pressure. Experiments using patterned wafers supported this hypothesis.

    5. Density Investigation by X-ray Reflectivity for Thin Films Synthesized Using Atmospheric CVD (pages 303–308)

      Shinichi Kishimoto, Tomoaki Hashiguchi, Shigeo Ohshio and Hidetoshi Saitoh

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200806703

      Full Paper: The density of oxide films was investigated by the XRR analysis. The samples were prepared using the CVD technique operated under atmosphere. The XRR profile of the hafnia films was fitted with the four-layer model that includes HfSiO and SiO2 layers. On the other hand, the XRR profile of the titania films was fitted using the seven-lamella model constructed by titania only. The density of hafnia and titania film was lower than that of bulk crystal. The XRR analysis may become powerful weapon to determine the structure model and density of each layer of the oxide film.

    6. An Investigation of Titanium-Vanadium Nitride Phase Space, Conducted Using Combinatorial Atmospheric Pressure CVD (pages 309–312)

      Geoffrey Hyett, Mark A. Green and Ivan P. Parkin

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200806705

      Full Paper: Combinatorial atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition has been used to form 12 members of the TixV1-xN alloy series with 0.29 < x < 094. All 12 phases were formed in a single experiment, in a single film, and the series was investigated for members with potential as heat mirror coatings.

    7. Thin Polymer Films with High Step Coverage in Microtrenches by Initiated CVD (pages 313–318)

      Salmaan H. Baxamusa and Karen K. Gleason

      Version of Record online: 6 OCT 2008 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200806713

      Full Paper: Initiated chemical vapor deposition (iCVD) was used to deposit thin polymeric films in microtrenches. An analytical model was developed to determine the sticking coefficient of the initiating radical. Good step coverage was obtained by lowering the fractional saturation of the monomer during deposition.

  5. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communication
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index

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