Chemical Vapor Deposition

Cover image for Vol. 15 Issue 7‐9

September 2009

Volume 15, Issue 7-9

Pages 163–249

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communications
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communications
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
  3. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communications
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    1. Deposition of BaHfO3 Dielectric Layers for Microelectronic Applications by Pulsed Liquid Injection MOCVD (pages 167–170)

      Grzegorz Lupina, Mindaugas Lukosius, Christian Wenger, Piotr Dudek, Grzegorz Kozlowski, Hans-Joachim Müssig, Adulfas Abrutis, Raimondas Galvelis, Tomas Katkus, Zita Saltyte and Virgaudas Kubilius

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200804272

      This paper is concerned with the deposition and characterization of thin layers of BaHfO3 in the view of storage capacitor applications in random access memories. Growth of pure BaHfO3 was obtained at deposition temperatures of 600–700 °C using a combination of Ba(thd)2 and Hf(thd)4 precursors. The resulting layers crystallize in the cubic perovskite structure and exhibit a dielectric constant of ∼35.

    2. N-Doped Titania Thin Films Prepared by Atmospheric Pressure CVD using t-Butylamine as the Nitrogen Source: Enhanced Photocatalytic Activity under Visible Light (pages 171–174)

      Charles. W. Dunnill and Ivan. P. Parkin

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200806274

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      N-TiO2 prepared by atmospheric pressure chemical vapour deposition shows visible light photocatalysis. This is to our knowledge the first example of an N-doped anatase film with only interstitial doping. The film was prepared using a method that is entirely compatible with industrial processes for producing self-cleaning glass.

    3. Growth of Germanium Islands, Wires, or Films from CVD with a New Precursor (pages 175–178)

      Sang-Woo Kang, Jin-Tae Kim, Ju-Young Yun, Kyoung-Chun Seo, Jae-Su Shin and Il-Doo Yang

      Version of Record online: 28 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200904277

      A new germanium precursor, ethylmethylaminogermane (H3Ge-N(CH3)(C2H5), was synthesized and characterized. The new Ge precursor has high vapor pressure and stability, which were measured by a home-made apparatus and thermogravimetric analysis, respectively. The Ge NWs, islands, films, or mixed structures on Si and Au substrates were obtained by CVD in the temperature range 300-400 °C and pressure range 67–267 Pa.

  4. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communications
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    1. Surface and Chemical Characterization of PolyLA Thin Films Fabricated Using Plasma Polymerization (pages 179–185)

      Christopher D. Easton, Mohan V. Jacob, Robert A. Shanks and Bruce F. Bowden

      Version of Record online: 14 APR 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200806719

      Fabrication of polymer thin films from Lavandula angustifolia essential oil via RF plasma polymerization has been undertaken. The chemical structure of the polymer has been studied via FTIR and NMR spectroscopy. AFM has been employed to image the surface of the material at the nanometer scale, while water contact angle measurements were performed to determine the affinity to water of the polymer.

    2. Atomic Layer Deposition of NiO by the Ni(thd)2/H2O Precursor Combination (pages 186–191)

      Erik Lindahl, Mikael Ottosson and Jan-Otto Carlsson

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200906762

      Nickel oxide has been deposited by atomic layer deposition by using bis(2,2,6.6-tetramethylheptane-3,5-dionato)nickel(II) and water as precursors. The growth is very sensitive to surface hydroxyl groups and hence a large excess of water was needed to reach saturation. The influence of deposition parameters on growth kinetics and microstructure has also been studied.

    3. A Novel Approach for Chemical Vapor Synthesis of ZnO Nanocrystals: Optimization of Yield, Crystallinity (pages 192–198)

      Moazzam Ali, Nina Friedenberger, Marina Spasova and Markus Winterer

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200806722

      A novel Chemical Vapor Synthesis setup – a microwave plasma combined with a hot wall zone – is proposed to minimize the loss of materials at higher reactor temperatures and to improve the crystallinity of ZnO nanocrystals.

    4. Deposition of Mo Oxide and Metallic Mo Films by Chemical Vapor Transport of MoO3(OH)2 (pages 199–203)

      Young Jung Lee, Young Ik Seo, Se Hoon Kim, Dae-Gun Kim and Young Do Kim

      Version of Record online: 25 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200906738

      MoO2 and Mo films were successfully deposited on the surface of a Cu substrate by CVT of volatile MoO3(OH)2. The deposition of MoO2 nanoparticles caused significant changes in electrical resistance around 500 °C. MoO2 and Mo nanoparticles deposited at 550 °C and 800 °C covered the whole surface of a Cu wire with 100 and 200 nm particle sizes, respectively. MoO2 film was homogeneously deposited on the Cu plate for the metallic substrate and oxidized Si wafer for ceramic substrate. Metallic Mo film was subsequently deposited on the Cu plate, respectively.

    5. Effects of Deposition Conditions on the Structure and Chemical Properties of Carbon Nanopipettes (pages 204–208)

      Elina A. Vitol, Michael G. Schrlau, Sanjib Bhattacharyya, Paul Ducheyne, Haim H. Bau, Gary Friedman and Yury Gogotsi

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200906784

      Carbon nanopipettes (CNPs) are integrated devices combining a nanometer-size carbon tip with a glass pipette. The carbon tip is produced by catalytic CVD. In this paper, it is demonstrated that the structure of the CNPs can be controlled by varying the synthesis parameters. Increased carbon graphitization is observed as the synthesis temperature increases from 890 °C to 950 °C. A similar effect is achieved by lowering the carbon precursor (methane) concentration from 60% to 20%. Changes in the amount of catalyst do not have a significant effect on the carbon graphitization. At the same time, CNPs with relatively large amounts of hydrogen bonds on the surface are obtained by using a high methane concentration. This finding is used to facilitate the functionalization of the CNPs with gold nanoparticles.

    6. Diamond CVD by a Combined Plasma Pretreatment and Seeding Procedure (pages 209–216)

      Shlomo Zalka Rotter and Joana Catarina Madaleno

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200806745

      Diamond films were deposited on different substrates using the Novel Nucleation Process. This method induces the formation of a thin carbon film, prior to the seeding procedure, which is consumed during the initial stages of diamond CVD. The method is described in detail and a simplified growth mechanism is proposed.

    7. The Effect of the H2 Flow Rate on the Deposition of TiO2 Film Produced by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Assisted CVD (pages 217–220)

      Dong-Su Jang, Soon-Ho Kwon, Hee-Yong Lee, Won-Kyun Yang and Jung-Joong Lee

      Version of Record online: 26 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200806765

      The influence of hydrogen flow rate on TiO2 thin films deposited using inductively coupled plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (ICP-CVD) was discussed. Anatase and rutile TiO2 films were obtained without any external heating. Plasma diagnostics (OES, SLP) were performed, and several properties of the TiO2 films were characterized.

    8. Atomic Layer Deposition of Ta2O5/Polyimide Nanolaminates (pages 221–226)

      Leo D. Salmi, Esa Puukilainen, Marko Vehkamäki, Mikko Heikkilä and Mikko Ritala

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200906770

      Ta2O5/polyimide nanolaminates were deposited by atomic layer deposition at 170 °C using Ta(OEt)5 and H2O as precursors for Ta2O5 and pyromellitic dianhydride and 1,6-diaminohexane for polyimide. The nanolaminates were characterized by X-ray reflection, field emission scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, capacitance and current–voltage measurements, and nanoindentation. It was shown that Ta2O5/polyimide nanolaminates combine low leakage current density and high flexibility.

    9. Atmospheric Pressure Process for Coating Particles Using Atomic Layer Deposition (pages 227–233)

      Renske Beetstra, Ugo Lafont, John Nijenhuis, Erik M. Kelder and J. Ruud van Ommen

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200906775

      Atomic layer deposition produces homogeneous coatings with thicknesses controllable to the atomic level, and is therefore very suitable to functionalize nanomaterials. We coated LiMn2O4 particles (primary particles 200-500 nm in diameter) with Al2O3 layers. Characterization with TEM, BET, and EDX shows that individual particles (not agglomerates) are coated and confirms the homogeneity.

    10. Repeated Growing and Annealing Towards ZnO Film by Metal-Organic CVD (pages 234–241)

      Chia-Cheng Wu, Dong-Sing Wuu, Po-Rung Lin, Tsai-Ning Chen and Ray-Hua Horng

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200906782

      ZnO is a very attractive material for application in optical devices such as light-emitting diodes and laser diodes. Surface morphology of ZnO grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition as a function of growth temperature was systematically investigated. The surface morphology of ZnO structures changed significantly with increasing growth temperature. For obtaining the ZnO film, the growth mode of repeated growing and annealing was conducted to produce high-quality ZnO film.

    11. Planar Source Line-of-Sight Model with Automatically Adjusting Time Increment and Local Sticking Factors (pages 242–248)

      Jonathan Jilesen and Fue-Sang Lien

      Version of Record online: 28 AUG 2009 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200806741

      Development of a ballistic transport model which uses a source plane and cylindrical coordinates to predict initial surface flux arriving from the source volume. A source plane allows for calculation of effective reactivity maps for geometries at the feature scale, increasing linking flexibility when applied to multiscale modeling. The model also includes an algorithm which allows the time step to be automatically varied, reducing the cost of accurately capturing feature closures.

  5. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communications
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index

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