Chemical Vapor Deposition

Cover image for Vol. 16 Issue 10‐12

Special Issue: Special Issue on Hydrogen

December, 2010

Volume 16, Issue 10-12

Pages 259–346

Issue edited by: Davide Barreca, Alberto Gasparotto

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index
  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index
  3. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index
    1. Special Issue on ‘CVD and Hydrogen’ (pages 264–265)

      Davide Barreca and Alberto Gasparotto

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.201000005

  4. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index
    1. Role of Hydrogen in the CVD of Wide Bandgap Nitride Semiconductors (pages 266–274)

      Stephen J. Pearton and Alexander Y. Polyakov

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.201000041

      Hydrogen plays an important role in the CVD growth of the wide bandgap GaN and AlGaN materials system and also in the subsequent processing of these semiconductors. It diffuses rapidly in these materials even at quite low temperatures and can profoundly affect the electrical properties. A review is given of the present understanding of hydrogen in the wide bandgap nitrides.

    2. Production and Detection of H Atoms and Vibrationally Excited H2 Molecules in CVD Processes (pages 275–290)

      Hironobu Umemoto

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.201000043

      The production mechanisms and the gas-phase diagnostic techniques for H atoms, which play important roles in catalytic CVD (also called hot-wire CVD) and plasma-enhanced CVD processes, were reviewed. Experimentally determined absolute H-atom densities in typical CVD processes are compiled in a table. Procedures for producing and detecting vibrationally excited H2 molecules, which can be another active species in CVD processes, are also discussed.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index
    1. Preferential Orientation in Hematite Films for Solar Hydrogen Production via Water Splitting (pages 291–295)

      Maurin Cornuz, Michael Grätzel and Kevin Sivula

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.201004292

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The state-of-the-art performance, obtained through the reduction of precursor gas residence time in hematite photoanodes produced by APCVD, is explained in this report by an enhanced preferential orientation of the highly conductive crystal planes perpendicular to the electron-collecting substrate.

    2. CVD Co3O4 Nanopyramids: a Nano-Platform for Photo-Assisted H2 Production (pages 296–300)

      Davide Barreca, Paolo Fornasiero, Alberto Gasparotto, Valentina Gombac, Chiara Maccato, Andrea Pozza and Eugenio Tondello

      Version of Record online: 11 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.201004289

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Spinel-type Co3O4 nanopyramids grown by CVD starting from Co(hfa)2•TMEDA display attractive features for hydrogen production by photo-reforming of methanol solutions, especially in the presence of oxygen in the reaction medium. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first example of photo-activated H2 generation by means of supported cobalt oxide nanosystems.

    3. Substrate-Dependant Ability of Titanium(IV) Oxide Photocatalytic Thin Films Prepared by Thermal CVD to Generate Hydrogen Gas from a Sacrificial Reaction (pages 301–304)

      Geoffrey Hyett, Jawwad A. Darr, Andrew Mills and Ivan P. Parkin

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.201004298

      We report the observation of hydrogen production from photodiodes, when irradiated with UV light. These photodiodes were composed of a stainless steel substrate, with a TiO2 photocatalyst deposited suing APCVD on one side and Pt deposited using sputter coating on the other. In contrast similar devices made using a titanium substrate show no measurable H2 production.

  6. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index
    1. Hydrogen Production by Glycerol Steam Reforming with Ru-based Catalysts: A Study on Sn Doping (pages 305–310)

      Alessandro Gallo, Claudio Pirovano, Marcello Marelli, Rinaldo Psaro and Vladimiro Dal Santo

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.201006864

      Monometallic Ru and bimetallic Ru-Sn heterogeneous catalysts were prepared by CVD of Ru(TMHD)3 and Sn(n-Bu)4 precursors on Mg(Al)O mixed oxide support. Ru/Mg(Al)O system was very efficient and durable in the hydrogen production by glycerol steam reforming. The effect of tin addiction was investigated and at low loadings it selectively decorates Ru faces sites leaving exposed the most active Ru sites.

    2. Fabrication of La0.8Sr0.2CrO3-based Perovskite Film via Flame-Assisted Vapor Deposition for H2 Production by Reforming (pages 311–321)

      Mayuree Sansernnivet, Navadol Laosiripojana, Suttichai Assabumrungrat and Sumittra Charojrochkul

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.201006857

      Dense and porous La0.8Sr0.2CrO3 films for use in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells are fabricated on stainless steel using a flame-assisted CVD route, starting from a solution of the corresponding metal nitrates. The interrelations between the processing parameters and the film morphology and microstructure are investigated by SEM and XRD. The functional properties of the obtained systems in H2 production by methane steam reforming are also presented and discussed.

    3. CVD Nanocasting Routes to Zeolite-Templated Carbons for Hydrogen Storage (pages 322–328)

      Yongde Xia, Zhuxian Yang and Robert Mokaya

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.201006865

      A systematic study of CVD-based synthesis strategies for the fabrication of zeolite-templated carbons, using commercially available zeolite Y as hard template, has generated predominantly microporous carbons with surface area of 850−2160m2/g and pore volume of 0.87−1.26cm3/g. The templated carbons exhibit variable hydrogen uptake capacity in the range 1.9–4.9wt% (at −196°C and 20 bar), with the uptake dependent on the textural properties. The study clarifies on the effect of the nature of carbon precursor and the influence of using two CVD steps or a combination of liquid impregnation and CVD.

    4. Reactivity of Silicon Surfaces in the Presence of Adsorbed Hydrogen and Chlorine (pages 329–335)

      Carlo Cavallotti

      Version of Record online: 22 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.201006870

      The adsorption and desorption kinetics of hydrogen and hydrogen chloride on a silicon surface were computationally investigated using density functional and coupled cluster theories. The investigated mechanisms were the pairwise intradimer and the 4H-2H reaction pathways. The calculations reveal that, while the H2 surface desorption dynamics is dominated by the 4H-2H mechanisms, the fastest HCl desorption mechanism proceeds through the intradimer pathway.

    5. Modeling the Transport and Reaction Mechanisms of Copper Oxide CVD (pages 336–345)

      David Arana-Chavez, Edward Toumayan, Federico Lora, Christopher McCaslin and Raymond A. Adomaitis

      Version of Record online: 3 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.201006873

      Chemical vapor deposition of copper oxide films using a hot-wall tubular reactor and a cuprous iodide and oxygen precursor system is studied experimentally and by developing a sequence of empirical response surface models and physically based transport and deposition chemistry models. In particular, the source of an unusually sharp transition between distinct cuprous and cupric oxide phases is attributed to the O2 gradient resulting from the back-diffusion of this reactant and surface reactions producing the copper oxide films.

  7. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Editorial
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Full Papers
    8. Index

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