Chemical Vapor Deposition

Cover image for Vol. 16 Issue 7‐9

September 2010

Volume 16, Issue 7-9

Pages 199–254

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communications
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communications
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    1. Contents: (Chem. Vap. Deposition 7–8–9/2010) (pages 199–201)

      Article first published online: 6 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.201090007

  3. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communications
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    1. Deposition of Large-Area and Protective Diamond-like Carbon Coatings on Glass Substrates by Low-Pressure Dielectric Barrier Discharges (pages 203–205)

      Jinhai Niu, Dongping Liu, Yangbiao Ou, Yuting You and Naisen Yu

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.200904283

      Large-area (370mm×500mm) diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were deposited on the glass substrate by low-pressure dielectric barrier discharges. The deposited DLC films were hard, homogeneous and extremely smooth. The DLC film deposited on the large-area glass can be potentially used as a scratch resistant and corrosion barrier layer.

    2. Using Precursor Chemistry to Template Vanadium Oxide for Chemical Sensing (pages 206–210)

      Joseph A. Beardslee, Anna K. Mebust, Adam S. Chaimowitz, Casey R. Davis–VanAtta, Heidi Leonard, Tyler L. Moersch, Mohammed Y. Afridi and Charles J. Taylor

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.201004286

      Two single source precursors for vanadium oxide (vanadium oxytripropoxide, VO(OC3H7)3 and vanadium oxytrinitrate, VO(NO3)3) are used to prepare selective chemical sensors. Sensors demonstrate reduced sensitivity to compounds formed during their preparation. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy studies suggest that this selectivity is likely due to preferred orientation resulting from differences in the molecular structures of the single source precursors used for preparing the vanadium oxide.

    3. Silicon Carbonitride (SiCN) Films by Remote Hydrogen Microwave Plasma CVD from Tris(dimethylamino)silane as Novel Single-Source Precursor (pages 211–215)

      Aleksander M. Wrobel, Iwona Blaszczyk-Lezak, Pawel Uznanski and Bartosz Glebocki

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.201004287

      SiCN films were produced by remote microwave hydrogen plasma CVD (RP-CVD) from tris(dimethylamino)silane precursor using different substrate temperature in the range TS=30-400°C. The effect of TS on the rate of RP-CVD, chemical structure, surface morphology, density, and photoluminescence (PL) of resulting films is reported. The increase in TS causes the formation of silicon carbonitride network, marked densification and smoothening of film surface, as well as shift of PL peak position.

    4. Growth of [100]-Textured Gadolinium Nitride Films by CVD (pages 216–219)

      Joseph R. Brewer, Zane Gernhart, Hsin-Yu Liu and Chin Li Cheung

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.201004288

      Textured gadolinium nitride (GdN) thin films grown on (100) lanthanum aluminum oxide substrates were prepared by chemical vapor deposition with gadolinium chloride and ammonia. The films were found to have a (100) planar orientation and a growth rate of 102±5nm/min. X-ray diffraction patterns show that the (200) reflection peaks from these GdN films have full widths at half maximum of ca. 1.2°.

  4. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communications
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index
    1. Multifunctional Nanocomposite Thin Films by Aerosol-Assisted CVD (pages 220–224)

      Michael E.A. Warwick, Charles W. Dunnill and Russell Binions

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.201006841

      An aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition methodology has been used to synthesise nanocomposite thin films of titanium dioxide and tin dioxide on glass substrates. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed that film composition and morphology were linked; with larger island sizes being observed as more tin dioxide nanoparticles were incorporated into the films. The films displayed both photo-catalytic and infra-red reflective properties.

    2. In-situ Bulk Electrophoretic Separation of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Grown by Gas-Phase Catalytic Hydrocarbon Decomposition (pages 225–230)

      Dmitriy V. Smovzh, Vasiliy A. Maltsev, Staffan Dittmer, Vladimir I. Zaikovsky, Eleanor E.B. Campbell and Oleg A. Nerushev

      Article first published online: 2 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.201006842

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Electrophoresis is used to separate carbon nanotubes from by-products during CVD synthesis. Carbon nanotubes are trapped by electric fields with higher efficiency than other products. The results indicate that the nanotubes produced by thermal CVD in gas phase are negatively charged.

    3. Investigation of Atmospheric Pressure CVD-Produced Aluminum Coatings for the Protection of Steel from Corrosion (pages 231–238)

      Sipeng Gu, Sungmin Maeng, Yongseok Suh, Roland A. Levy, Dennis L. Deavenport, Fernando J. Gómez, Samuel S. Newberg, Eric W. Brooman, Elizabeth S. Berman, John J. Kleek, John H. Beatty, Andrew S. Schwartz and Stephen P. Gaydos

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.201006845

      This study investigates the use of atmospheric pressure chemically vapor deposited (APCVD) aluminum coatings for corrosion protection of steel. Characterization and performance tests were conducted to evaluate the structural, morphological, electrical, mechanical, corrosion resistance, and hydrogen embrittlement properties of those coatings. Results of those tests reveal that the APCVD Al process produced at high growth rates can be a viable candidate for corrosion protection of steel.

    4. [cis-(1,3-Diene)2W(CO)2] Complexes as MOCVD Precursors for the Deposition of Thin Tungsten – Tungsten Carbide Films (pages 239–247)

      Ilona Jipa, Frank W. Heinemann, Andreas Schneider, Nadejda Popovska, M. Aslam Siddiqi, Rehan A. Siddiqui, Burak Atakan, Hubertus Marbach, Christian Papp, Hans-Peter Steinrück and Ulrich Zenneck

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.201006852

      Tungsten - tungsten carbide thin films were deposited by MOCVD processes on silica coated silicon wafers using [cis-(1,3-butadiene)2W(CO)2] and [cis-(1,3-cyclohexadiene)2W(CO)2], respectively, as tunable precursor complexes. The compounds were prepared through photochemical ligand exchange reactions from [W(CO)6] and fully characterized including X-ray structure determination and detailed DTA/TG investigations. Gas phase diffusion coefficients and the vapor pressure of the compounds have been calculated. The MOCVD experiments have been performed in a vertical cold-wall reactor and the exhaust gas was analyzed by gas chromatography. XPS, XRD, AFM, and SEM measurements have been utilized for film characterization. Consequences of the high oxophilicity of freshly formed tungsten surfaces, consecutive surface reactions of the complex ligands, film growth and film properties are discussed. Inside the layers, tungsten carbide was identified as the main component.

    5. Mass Analysis of Growth of Al2O3 Thin Films from Low-Temperature Atomic Layer Deposition on Woven Cotton (pages 248–253)

      Daisuke Hojo and Tadafumi Adschiri

      Article first published online: 27 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.201006854

      Low-temperature ALD provided conformal Al2O3 coating on cotton templates such that only several atomic layers were sufficient to preserve the original structure intact even after removing the template. Mass analysis using these replicated structures revealed that the coating growth at initiation was enhanced due to residual water on the fibers. The growth rate in the linear regime was calculated to be 0.13nm per cycle.

  5. Index

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Communications
    5. Full Papers
    6. Index

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