Chemical Vapor Deposition

Cover image for Chemical Vapor Deposition

July 1995

Volume 1, Issue 1

Pages fmi–fmi, 5–34

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Review
    5. Communications
    6. Book Reviews
    7. CVD Forum
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19950010101

  2. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Review
    5. Communications
    6. Book Reviews
    7. CVD Forum
    1. A professional forum for the field of chemical vapor deposition (pages 5–7)

      Prof. Michael Hitchman

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19950010102

      The first issue of CVD has arrived! The co-editor of the new section of Advanced Materials, Michael Hitchman of the University of Strathclyde, sets the scene with a description of the structure, organization, and aims of CVD, a historical account of the development of chemical vapor deposition technology, and his aims in providing a useful service for the materials science, chemistry, physics, and engineering communities.

  3. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Review
    5. Communications
    6. Book Reviews
    7. CVD Forum
    1. Chemical vapor deposition of metals: Part 1. An overview of CVD processes (pages 8–23)

      Prof. Mark J. Hampden-Smith and Prof. Toivo T. Kodas

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19950010103

      The chemical vapor deposition of metals is a rapidly developing area in which metal-containing compounds are being synthesized as new precursors. Precursor design, reaction pathways, reactor types and the influence of the reactor operating conditions on film growth are reviewed in the first part of a two-part article. The second installment will appear in the September issue of Advanced Materials CVD.

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Review
    5. Communications
    6. Book Reviews
    7. CVD Forum
    1. The deposition of aluminum thin films by CVD using a novel adduct of dimethylaluminum hydride (pages 24–26)

      Dr. Anthony C. Jones, Dr. David J. Houlton, Simon A. Rushwarth, Julia A. Flanagan, Juliette R. Brown and Gary W. Critchlow

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19950010104

      Thin films of aluminum have an important application in the metallization of silicon devices in very large scale integration technology. In this communication a new precursor, NMe2AlH(NMe2Et)2 has been used for the CVD of high purity aluminum in the temperature range 250–350 °C. In contrast to currently available precursors it is a free flowing and non-pyrophoric liquid, making it less hazardous and more convenient for use in CVD.

    2. The deposition of platinum-containing tin oxide thin films by metal-organic CVD (pages 26–28)

      Dr. David J. Houlton, Dr. Anthony C. Jones, Dr. Peter W. Haycock, Prof. Edward W. Williams, John Bull and Gary W. Critchlow

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19950010105

      The metal oxide semiconductor SnO2 has a range of important applications, such as in transparent and conducting coatings on glass, and in gas-sensing devices. CVD has a number of advantages as the technique of choice for the deposition of SnO2 thin films but development has in the past been hampered by the high toxicity of the available precursors and the necessity of adding an oxidant such as O2 or H2O. Here, SnO2 deposition from the relatively non-toxic tetra-t-butoxide tin in the absence of added oxidant is reported. Platinum doping of the material is also discussed.

    3. Preparation and thermolysis of a single-source precursor to gallium arsenide phosphide (pages 28–31)

      Dr. Steven R. Aubuchon, Michael S. Lube and Prof. Richard L. Wells

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19950010106

      Stoichiometrically controlled, reproducible ternary 13–15 semi-conductor materials such as GaAsP can now be produced from a single source precursor. Although these materials can be formulated using conventional multi-precursor CVD techniques, control over the stoichiometry, and thus the behavior of the semiconductors, is difficult. The synthesis and performance of the new single-source precursor are presented.

  5. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Review
    5. Communications
    6. Book Reviews
    7. CVD Forum
  6. CVD Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Review
    5. Communications
    6. Book Reviews
    7. CVD Forum
    1. CVD Forum (page 34)

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19950010110

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