Chemical Vapor Deposition

Cover image for Chemical Vapor Deposition

September 1996

Volume 2, Issue 5

Pages fmi–fmi, 169–214

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essays
    4. Communications
    5. Full Papers
    6. Miscellaneous
    7. Book Reviews
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19960020501

  2. Essays

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essays
    4. Communications
    5. Full Papers
    6. Miscellaneous
    7. Book Reviews
    1. The Present and future of CVD studies in Korea (pages 169–170)

      Prof. S. S. Choi

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19960020502

      South Korea is one of the most rapidly growing countries in terms of technological developments. Advanced materials in general and CVD in particular will undoubtedly play an important role in those developments. In this essay Professor Choi outlines the short history of CVD in Korea, high-lights some of the key features of present day Korean CVD, and points out future trends. He pays particular attention to the range of results presented at the first Korean Chemical Vapor Deposition Symposium, which was held last year.

  3. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essays
    4. Communications
    5. Full Papers
    6. Miscellaneous
    7. Book Reviews
    1. Low temperature, aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD) of CdS, ZnS, and Cd1-xZnxS using monomeric single-source precursors: M(SOCCH3)2 TMEDA (pages 171–174)

      Dr. May Nyman, Prof. Mark J. Hampden-Smith and Dr. Eileen N. Duesler

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19960020503

      Novel, monomeric single-source precursors for the CVD of metal sulfides, which are widely used in solar cell technology, are described. The Figure shows the molecular structure of M(SOCCH3)TMEDA, where TMEDA = N,N,N,N-tetramethylethylenediamine, for the Cd and Zn complexes. These compounds allow the lowest deposition temperatures so far reported for highly oriented crystalline, stoichiometric films.

    2. Preparation of copper sulfide thin layers by a single-source MOCVD process (pages 174–179)

      Prof. Ryôki Nomura, Keico Miyawaki, Takayuki Toyosaki and Prof. Haruo Matsuda

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19960020504

      Metal dithiocarbamate complexes are also potential candidates for the CVD of metal sulfides (see previous article). This paper reports on an investigation by mass fragmentation initiated by electron impact of the vapor phase decomposition of a copper complex in order to clarify the decomposition route and to assess its suitability as a single-source precursor for the MOCVD growth of cuprous sulfide. Reproducible growth of crystalline layers was found and the results suggested a two-step growth mode.

    3. Coating of TiO2 particles by chemical vapor deposition of SiO2 (pages 179–181)

      Quint. H. Powell, Prof. Toivo. T. Kodas and Dr. Bruce M. Anderson

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19960020505

      A simple CVD process for coating titanium dioxide particles to improve dispersion, pigment durability, and resistance to viscosity increases in paints is presented. The conventionally used liquid-phase routes are complicated and expensive and often lead to porous layers, which have high oil absorption, whereas the continuous, high temperature gas phase route described here produces dense layers of silica. The Figure shows a possible mechanism for the coating process.

    4. Chemical vapor deposition of Gallium selenide and indium selenide nanoparticles (pages 182–184)

      Dr. Sarah L. Stoll, Dr. Edward G. Gillan and Prof. Andrew R. Barron

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19960020506

      Nanometer-sized structures can exhibit quite different properties from those of their macroscopic forms. In this paper is is reported that, under suitable conditions, well-defined nanoparticles of InSe and GaSe may be obtained from the vapor phase thermolysis of heterocubane molecules. For example, InSe grown from [(EtMe2C)InSe]4 consists of spheres with a mean diameter of 88 nm (standard deviation s.d. = 30 nm), while GaSe grown from [(tBu)GaSe]4 produces pseudo-spherical nanoparticles with a mean diameter of 42 nm (s.d. = 13 nm). Possible controlling mechanisms are discussed.

  4. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essays
    4. Communications
    5. Full Papers
    6. Miscellaneous
    7. Book Reviews
    1. Metal-organic vapor phase epitaxial growth of cubic Gallium selenide, Ga2Se3 (pages 185–189)

      Dr. Tat Lin Ng, Dr. Nicolas Maung, Dr. Guanghan Fan, Dr. Ian B. Poole, Prof. John O. Williams, Dr. Andrew C. Wright, Dr. Douglas F. Foster and David J. Cole-Hamilton

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19960020507

      The first in-depth study of the MOVPE of Ga2Se3 is reported. It is found that trimethylgallium (TMGa) pre-reacts with the hydride H2Se in the gas phase to yield films which are only partially epitaxial and that combination of TMGa with ditertiarybutylselenide produces films of the best crystalline quality under steady state flow conditions. The Figure shows a cross-sectional bright field image of epitaxial cubic Ga2Se3 on Gap.

    2. Thin film growth and microstructure analysis of CeO2 prepared by MOCVD (pages 191–197)

      Dr. Michael Becht and Dr. Tadataka Morishita

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19960020508

      The effect of reaction parameters on the MOCVD of CeO2 is described in detail. The films were prepared using [tetrakis(2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptanedionato)cerium(IV)] as a precursor and the influence of substrate type and substrate temperature, precursor evaporation temperature, oxygen partial pressure, and deposition time on the film growth and microstructure have been investigated. The films were found to be polycrystalline with a (100) preferential orientation and SEM images demonstrated a columnar microstructure.

    3. The influence of Fe-group metals on the CVD of titanium carbide (pages 199–208)

      Dr. Igor Y. Konyashin

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19960020509

      Titanium carbide is an important refractory coating material, and while many papers have been devoted to the CVD of TiC, the influence of different catalytic activities of Fe-group metals contained in substrates on deposition rates, microstructure, and morphology remains an important area of study. The Figure illustrates the dramatic influence Co in the substrate has on layer appearance. A mechanism is postulated based on the catalytic effect of the metals on methane activation and decomposition.

  5. Miscellaneous

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essays
    4. Communications
    5. Full Papers
    6. Miscellaneous
    7. Book Reviews
    1. Announcement and call for papers (page 209)

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19960020510

  6. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essays
    4. Communications
    5. Full Papers
    6. Miscellaneous
    7. Book Reviews

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