Chemical Vapor Deposition

Cover image for Chemical Vapor Deposition

February 1997

Volume 3, Issue 1

Pages fmi–fmi, 9–66

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Communications
    5. Full Papers
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19970030101

  2. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Communications
    5. Full Papers
    1. Metal-organic CVD of the high-Tc superconductor YBa2Cu3O7−δ (pages 9–26)

      Dr. Ian M. Watson

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19970030102

      Review: The quality of HTS films produced by MOCVD is now similar to that obtained by any other method. For example, it is possible to grow precipitate-free films with a roughness better than ±1 nm over a 10 μm square area (see Figure). In addition, MOCVD has the attractive opportunity for large area growth. This article reviews precursors for YBCO growth, methods of delivering the precursors to the reactor deposition zone and of activating the deposition process, and applications of MOCVD YBCO layers.

  3. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Communications
    5. Full Papers
    1. Liquid-delivery MOCVD of La1−xSrxMnO3−δ thin films (pages 27–30)

      Prof. Klaus-Hermann Dahmen and Dr. Michael W. Carris

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19970030103

      Communication: The properties of perovskite materials make them suitable for many applications. Recently the perovskite La1−xMxMno3−δ, where M = Ca, Sr, or Ba, has attracted much attention because of its colossal magnetoresistance. Previous attempts to deposit thin films by PVD or MOCVD have required films to be post-annealed to obtain good transport properties. This paper shows that by increasing the oxygen partial pressure during deposition good quality layers can be grown without any post-annealing.

    2. Is interfacial silicon carbide necessary for the epitaxy of diamond on (100) silicon? (pages 30–33)

      Prof. Phillip John, Dr. David K. Milne, Dr. Michael G. Jubber and Prof. John I. B. Wilson

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19970030104

      Communication: The heteroepitaxy of diamond is of considerable scientific and technological interest. The significant lattice mismatch between diamond and silicon and the relatively high surface energy of a non-terminated (100) diamond plane have prompted speculation that diamond nucleates on an aligned cubic silicon carbide interfacial layer. In this paper spectral and microscopic studies show that while formation of interfacial amorphous carbon and silicon carbide must be avoided, nevertheless an interfacial SiC layer is intimately involved in localized heteroepitaxial growth on (100) silicon.

    3. Amine-stabilized cyclopentadienyl diisobutyl aluminum complexes as new kinds of precursors for the deposition of thin aluminum films by CVD (pages 33–35)

      Dr. Markus Scherer and Prof. Thomas Kruck

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19970030105

      Communication: The heteroepitaxy of diamond is of considerable scientific and technological interest. The significant lattice mismatch between diamond and silicon and the relatively high surface energy of a non-terminated (100) diamond plane have prompted speculation that diamond nucleates on an aligned cubic silicon carbide interfacial layer. In this paper spectral and microscopic studies show that while formation of interfacial amorphous carbon and silicon carbide must be avoided, nevertheless an interfacial SiC layer is intimately involved in localized heteroepitaxial growth on (100) silicon.

  4. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Communications
    5. Full Papers
    1. Growth of Copper Films by Metal Organic Vapor Deposition Using (Pyrazolylborate)copper(I) Compounds (pages 37–43)

      Elisabeth-Charlotte Plappert, Dr. Thomas Stumm, Prof. Herbert van den Bergh, Dr. Roland Hauert and Dr. Klaus-Hermann Dahmen

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19970030106

      Full Paper: Copper is a good alternative to aluminum for silicon metallization. The MOCVD of copper has been mostly carried out using oxygen containing ligands, but there is the danger that this element may be incorporated into the layer. In this paper copper(I) pyrazolylborate compounds are evaluated for their use in Cu MOCVD. These precursors give three-dimensional growth of Cu (see Figure) and would be particularly useful for doping oxygen-sensitive materials with copper.

    2. Atomic Layer Epitaxy of Copper on Tantalum (pages 45–50)

      Dr. Per Mårtensson and Prof. Jan-Otto Carlsson

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19970030107

      Full Paper: The first atomic layer epitaxy (ALE) of copper is reported here. The films were deposited on tantalum substrates from copper(I) chloride with hydrogen as a reducting agent and were found to be polycrystalline and practically free from texture. A study of the kinetics of deposition showed that initially there was a fast tantalum substrate reduction process followed by slower kinetics with the reaction of hydrogen with the adsorbed copper chloride being the rate-determining step. The activation energy for this step was estimated to be 80 kJ mol−1.

    3. The Kinetics of the Catalyzed CVD of Monocrystalline α-Silicon Nitride Filaments (pages 51–58)

      Dr. Michael A. Guggenberger and Dr. Klaus J. Hüttinger

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19970030108

      Full Paper: The kinetics of the catalyzed CVD of α-silicon nitride filaments from silicon subhydrides and ammonia is considered in a new approach. The results indicate, contrary to previously suggestions, that the deposition rate is determined by the partial dissociation of ammonia, with the catalyst also having a marked effect. The Figure shows the polyhedral shape of catalyst particles obtained for iron with a silicon content > 8 wt.-%.

    4. Silica Overlayers Prepared Using Organic Template Molecules on Tin Oxide and Its Molecular Sieving Property (pages 59–66)

      Nobuaki Kodakari, Dr. Naonobu Katada and Prof. Miki Niwa

      Version of Record online: 2 NOV 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/cvde.19970030109

      Full Paper: Molecular recognition has important analytical and sensor applications. One way of achieving this effect is to use molecular sieving based on the surface modification of a substrate. This paper describes the CVD from silicon alkoxide of microporous silica obtained by using pre-adsorbed benzoate anions as template molecules. Overlayers prepared in this way are able to discriminate between molecules based on their size or shape. This is illustrated by the application to various aldehydes.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION