Can new optical techniques for in vivo imaging and flow cytometry of the microcirculation benefit sickle cell disease research?

Authors

  • Stephen P. Morgan

    Corresponding author
    1. Electrical Systems and Optics Research Division, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham. NG7 2RD, United Kingdom
    • Electrical Systems and Optics Research Division, Faculty of Engineering, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham. NG7 2RD, United Kingdom
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Abstract

Intravital microscopy is a valuable tool for research into sickle cell disease with studies being carried out on transgenic mice and human volunteers. The method has helped to develop an explanation for sickle crises based on cell adhesion to the vascular endothelium followed by logjamming of rigid sickle cells and has stimulated much research into new treatments. In recent years there have been numerous new optical techniques developed for imaging the microcirculation and understanding the circulation of cells within the body, many of which have been further developed into in vivo flow cytometry techniques. This brief review highlights some of the progress made to date in the understanding of sickle cell disease using intravital microscopy. New techniques for imaging the microcirculation and their potential uses in understanding sickle cell disease are discussed. © 2011 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry

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