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Blood-brain barrier model optimized

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  2. Blood-brain barrier model optimized
  3. Proteomes from scratch

In vitro cell culture models of the blood-brain barrier are important tools to study cellular physiology and therapeutics for neurological disorders. While many models exist, it is not clear whether any of these have been effectively optimized. Diane Wuest and Kelvin Lee present a sequential-screening study to find the optimal conditions for primary murine endothelial cells in such a model. They compare co-cultures with primary mouse or rat astrocytes at different densities as well as three distinct media-feeding strategies to evaluate different biochemical agent exposure times. The optimized conditions increased transendothelial electrical resistance by over 200%; compared to an initial model and established a suitable in vitro model for brain disease application studies. Wuest and Lee, Biotechnol. J. 2012; 7:409–417.

Proteomes from scratch

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  2. Blood-brain barrier model optimized
  3. Proteomes from scratch

If you want to get anything interesting from human embryonic stem cells (hESC), it would help greatly to have a map of the territory you're stepping into. I'm not sure what the other guys are working with but Sarkar et al. have documented thoroughly the area they intend to explore by MS and fluorescence analysis of fractionated hESC. The cell is separated into cytosolic, nuclear and membrane fractions, all from the same batch of undifferentiated hESCs. They identified peptides quantitatively by spectral counting. Clusters of 893, 2475, and 1185 peptides were assigned to nuclear, cytosolic, and membrane fractions, respectively. Also turning up were auxiliary functional peptides for growth factor receptors, cell junction proteins, transcription factors, and proteins for remodeling other proteins and networks. To verify the origin of these proteins, they were tested against proteins of known location, such as ENY2 and CADH1, using immunofluorescence. Sarkar et al., Proteomics 2012;12:421–430.