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Peptide Carriers–Trojan Horses for Targeted Therapies

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  2. Peptide Carriers–Trojan Horses for Targeted Therapies
  3. Bead-Based Normalization of Mass Cytometry Data

Peptide carriers gain more and more interest for efficient drug delivery as an elegant targeted treatment in modern medicine. Their direct cellular administration avoids negative side effects which may occur during systemic drug application. Peptide carriers not only provide a broad variety of applications and combinatory options using nano- and microparticles but also open the door for individualized therapy concepts. For example, drug combinations using time-controlled release or specific targeted treatments are possible depending on the genetic basis of heterogeneous diseases (as in several cancer types) or diseases arising from chronic inflammations. This study—using cell penetrating peptides originating from human calcitonin and the active agent α-antitrypsin—can be regarded as a pilot study extendible to a broad range of drugs and active agents. The approach by Leßig and coworkers will allow the development of effective delivery systems for a wide range of potent therapeutic molecules with restricted availability and delivery capacity using conventional methods. 1

In this issue: page 461

Bead-Based Normalization of Mass Cytometry Data

  1. Top of page
  2. Peptide Carriers–Trojan Horses for Targeted Therapies
  3. Bead-Based Normalization of Mass Cytometry Data

The increased dimensionality of mass cytometry relative to standard fluorescence-based flow cytometry has enabled the collection of significantly more information at the single-cell level. Given this new detection modality, it is critical to account for variations related to instrument performance in order to produce a more accurate interpretation of the biological differences between samples. Finck and coworkers have developed a method that employs metal-embedded beads measured concurrently with cellular samples on the mass cytometer. The method described employs a multiplicative correction derived from slopes fitted between smoothed bead signals and their global averages, thus minimizing the effects of instrument variation on mass cytometry data. This expands the types of analyses available using mass cytometry by allowing comparisons to be made across data acquired over periods of weeks or longer. Additionally, software that implements the method is made freely available. 2

In this issue: page 483