Mesenchymal markers on human adipose stem/progenitor cells

Authors

  • Ludovic Zimmerlin,

    1. Division of Pediatric Oncology, Department of Oncology, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland
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  • Vera S. Donnenberg,

    1. Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    2. University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    3. McGowan Institute of Regenerative Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • J. Peter Rubin,

    1. McGowan Institute of Regenerative Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    2. Department of Plastic Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
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  • Albert D. Donnenberg

    Corresponding author
    1. University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    2. McGowan Institute of Regenerative Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    3. Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
    • Hillman Cancer Center Research Pavilion Suite 2.42c, 5117 Center Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213-2582, USA
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Abstract

The stromal-vascular fraction (SVF) of adipose tissue is a rich source of multipotent stem cells. We and others have described three major populations of stem/progenitor cells in this fraction, all closely associated with small blood vessels: endothelial progenitor cells (EPC, CD45−/CD31+/CD34+), pericytes (CD45−/CD31−/CD146+), and supra-adventitial adipose stromal cells (SA-ASC, CD45−/CD31−/CD146−/CD34+). EPC are luminal, pericytes are adventitial, and SA-ASC surround the vessel like a sheath. The multipotency of the pericytes and SA-ASC compartments is strikingly similar to that of CD45−/CD34−/CD73+/CD105+/CD90+ bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC). Here, we determine the extent to which this mesenchymal pattern is expressed on the three adipose stem/progenitor populations. Eight independent adipose tissue samples were analyzed in a single tube (CD105-FITC/CD73-PE/CD146-PETXR/CD14-PECY5/CD33-PECY5/CD235A-PECY5/CD31-PECY7/CD90-APC/CD34-A700/CD45-APCCY7/DAPI). Adipose EPC were highly proliferative with (14.3 ± 2.8)% (mean ± SEM) having >2N DNA. About half (53.1 ± 7.6)% coexpressed CD73 and CD105, and (71.9 ± 7.4)% expressed CD90. Pericytes were less proliferative [(8.2 ± 3.4)% >2N DNA)] with a smaller proportion [(29.6 ± 6.9)% CD73+/CD105+, (60.5 ± 10.2)% CD90+] expressing mesenchymal associated markers. However, the CD34+ subset of CD146+ pericytes were both highly proliferative [(15.1 ± 3.6)% with >2N DNA] and of uniform mesenchymal phenotype [(93.3 ± 3.7)% CD73+/CD105+, (97.8 ± 0.7)% CD90+], suggesting transit amplifying progenitor cells. SA-ASC were the least proliferative [(3.7 ± 0.8)%>2N DNA] but were also highly mesenchymal in phenotype [(94.4 ± 3.2)% CD73+/CD105+, (95.5 ± 1.2)% CD90+]. These data imply a progenitor/progeny relationship between pericytes and SA-ASC, the most mesenchymal of SVF cells. Despite phenotypic and functional similarities to BM-MSC, SA-ASC are distinguished by CD34 expression. © 2012 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry

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