In-a-dish: Induced pluripotent stem cells as a novel model for human diseases

Authors

  • P. C. B. Beltrão-Braga,

    Corresponding author
    1. Surgery Department, Stem Cell Laboratory, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
    2. Obstetrics Department, School of Arts, Sciences and Humanities, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
    • Surgery Department, Stem Cell Laboratory, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
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  • G. C. Pignatari,

    1. Surgery Department, Stem Cell Laboratory, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
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  • F. B. Russo,

    1. Surgery Department, Stem Cell Laboratory, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
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  • I. R. Fernandes,

    1. Surgery Department, Stem Cell Laboratory, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
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  • A. R. Muotri

    1. Surgery Department, Stem Cell Laboratory, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
    2. Department of Pediatrics/Rady Children's Hospital San Diego, University of California San Diego, School of Medicine, Stem Cell Program, La Jolla, California 92093, MC 0695
    3. Department of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, University of California San Diego, School of Medicine, Stem Cell Program, La Jolla, California 92093, MC 0695
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Abstract

Human pluripotent stem cells bring promise in regenerative medicine due to their self-renewing ability and the potential to become any cell type in the body. Moreover, pluripotent stem cells can produce specialized cell types that are affected in certain diseases, generating a new way to study cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the disease pathology under the controlled conditions of a scientific laboratory. Thus, induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) are already being used to gain insights into the biological mechanisms of several human disorders. Here we review the use of iPSC as a novel tool for disease modeling in the lab. © 2012 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry

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