Detection of circulating endothelial cells and endothelial progenitor cells by flow cytometry

Authors

  • Sameena S. Khan,

    1. Critical Care Medicine Department, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • Michael A. Solomon,

    1. Critical Care Medicine Department, Warren G. Magnuson Clinical Center, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
    2. Cardiology Branch, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
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  • J. Philip McCoy Jr.

    Corresponding author
    1. Flow Cytometry Core Facility, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, Maryland
    • National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, National Institutes of Health, Flow Cytometry Core Facility, Bethesda, MD
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  • This article is a US government work and, as such, is in the public domain in the United States of America.

Abstract

The finding of angiogenic and vasculogenic cells in the peripheral circulation may have profound effects on the course of a variety of diseases ranging from cancer to cardiovascular disease. These cells are ascribed to be endothelial in nature and are generally referred to as circulating endothelial cells if mature or as endothelial progenitor cells if immature. Different approaches have been used to detect these cells, including in vitro culture, magnetic bead isolation, and flow cytometry. We review flow cytometric methods for the detection and enumeration of these cells and provide technical suggestions to promote the accurate enumeration of circulating endothelial cells and endothelial progenitor cells. Published 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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