Evaluation of basophil activation in mastocytosis with Hymenoptera venom anaphylaxis

Authors

  • D. González-de-Olano,

    1. Allergy Unit, Hospital de Fuenlabrada, Madrid, Spain
    2. Red Española de Mastocitosis (REMA), Spain
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    • The first two authors contributed equally to the work and should be considered as first authors.

  • I. Álvarez-Twose,

    1. Red Española de Mastocitosis (REMA), Spain
    2. Instituto de Estudios de Mastocitosis de Castilla La Mancha, Hospital Virgen del Valle, Toledo, Spain
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    • The first two authors contributed equally to the work and should be considered as first authors.

  • J. M. Morgado,

    1. Red Española de Mastocitosis (REMA), Spain
    2. Instituto de Estudios de Mastocitosis de Castilla La Mancha, Hospital Virgen del Valle, Toledo, Spain
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  • M. I. Esteban López,

    1. Allergy Department, Hospital General de Segovia, Segovia, Spain
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  • A. Vega Castro,

    1. Allergy Department, Hospital de Guadalajara, Guadalajara, Spain
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  • M. D. Alonso Díaz de Durana,

    1. Allergy Unit, Fundación Hospital Alcorcón, Madrid, Spain
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  • L. Sánchez-Muñoz,

    1. Red Española de Mastocitosis (REMA), Spain
    2. Instituto de Estudios de Mastocitosis de Castilla La Mancha, Hospital Virgen del Valle, Toledo, Spain
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  • A. Matito,

    1. Red Española de Mastocitosis (REMA), Spain
    2. Instituto de Estudios de Mastocitosis de Castilla La Mancha, Hospital Virgen del Valle, Toledo, Spain
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  • B. de la Hoz Caballer,

    1. Red Española de Mastocitosis (REMA), Spain
    2. Allergy Department, Hospital Ramón y Cajal, Madrid, Spain
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  • M. L. Sanz,

    1. Allergy and Immunology Department, Clínica Universitaria de Navarra, Pamplona, Spain
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  • A. Orfao,

    1. Red Española de Mastocitosis (REMA), Spain
    2. Centro de Investigación del Cáncer/IBMCC, Departamento de Medicina and Servicio General de Citometría, University of Salamanca, Salamanca, Spain
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    • The last two authors contributed equally to the work and should be considered as last authors.

  • L. Escribano

    Corresponding author
    1. Red Española de Mastocitosis (REMA), Spain
    2. Instituto de Estudios de Mastocitosis de Castilla La Mancha, Hospital Virgen del Valle, Toledo, Spain
    • Instituto de Estudios de Mastocitosis de Castilla La Mancha, Hospital Virgen del Valle, Toledo, Spain
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    • The last two authors contributed equally to the work and should be considered as last authors.


  • How to cite this article: González-de-Olano D, Álvarez-Twose I, Morgado JM, Esteban López MI, Castro AV, Díaz de Durana MDA, Sánchez-Muñoz L, Matito A, de la Hoz Caballer B, Sanz ML, Orfao A, Escribano L. Evaluation of basophil activation in mastocytosis with hymenoptera venom anaphylaxis. Cytometry Part B 2011; 80B: 167–175.

Abstract

Background:

Basophil activation tests (BATs) have been demonstrated to be useful in detecting IgE-mediated sensitization by measuring basophil activation surface markers (CD63 and CD203c). Hymenoptera venom is one of the best known mediators-release trigger in patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM). The aim of this study was to investigate the use of BATs as an additional diagnostic tool in patients with mastocytosis suffering from hymenoptera venom anaphylaxis (HVA).

Methods:

A total of 22 patients with history of HVA and SM, together with a group of 11 patients with HVA in whom SM was ruled out after a complete bone marrow study, were analyzed.

Results:

Among 11 SM patients who had specific serum IgE (sIgE) against hymenoptera venom and an evaluable BAT, a positive BAT was found in nine. Additionally, a positive BAT was detected in three of seven patients who had no sIgE. These three patients had low levels of total IgE compared with control population (mean of 20 vs. 78 IU/mL); one had discontinued immunotherapy after 5 years, when sIgE levels had turned negative, and, in the other two patients, BAT identified the culprit insect.

Conclusions:

BAT is a useful complementary diagnostic tool to sIgE in mastocytosis patients with HVA, and it may contribute to predict or confirm these nearly fatal reactions, especially before discontinuing venom immunotherapy in patients who are negative for skin tests or sIgE or display low total IgE levels; in such cases, it also provides evidence on the culprit insect prompting HVA. © 2010 International Clinical Cytometry Society

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