Disorder-specific mental health service use for mood and anxiety disorders: associations with age, sex, and psychiatric comorbidity

Authors

  • Corey S. Mackenzie Ph.D.,

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
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  • Kristin Reynolds M.A.,

    1. Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
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  • John Cairney Ph.D.,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    2. Department of Family Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    3. Department of Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
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  • David L. Streiner Ph.D.,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    2. Department of Clinical Epidemiology & Biostatistics, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    3. Department of Psychiatry, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario, Canada
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  • Jitender Sareen M.D.

    1. Departments of Psychiatry, Psychology, and Community Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Canada
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  • The authors disclose the following financial relationships within the past 3 years: Contract grant sponsors: Manitoba Health Research Council Establishment Grant; Canadian Institutes for Health Research Master's Award; Manitoba Health Research Council Research Chair; National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism; Canadian Institutes of Health Research New Investigator Award

Correspondence to: Corey S. Mackenzie, Department of Psychology, University of Manitoba, P515 Duff Roblin Building, 190 Dysart Road, Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada R3T 2N2

Abstract

Background

The objectives of this study are to examine the prevalence of disorder-specific mental health service use for mood and anxiety disorders, and relationships between helpseeking and age, sex, and psychiatric comorbidity.

Methods

The authors used Wave 2 data from the National Epidemiologic Survey of Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC), which included 34,653 adults. Cross-tabulations provided helpseeking prevalence rates for five anxiety disorders and three mood disorders by age and sex, as well as for individuals with and without comorbid anxiety and mood disorders. Logistic regression analyses explored the likelihood of helpseeking among younger and middle-aged adults in comparison to older adults.

Results

The prevalence of helpseeking was highest for panic disorder (45.3%) and dysthymia (44.5%) and lowest for specific phobias (7.8%). For each condition except panic disorder service use was most likely among middle-aged adults and especially unlikely among older individuals. Sex differences in treatment seeking favoring women showed only modest variability with age. Finally, the prevalence of helpseeking was generally lower among individuals without comorbid anxiety or mood disorders, and the hill-shaped influence of age on service use was attenuated in this pure group.

Conclusions

The results of this study highlight the highest prevalence of disorder-specific service use among middle-aged adults and women, and among individuals with panic disorder and dysthymia. For purposes of identifying groups who are in need of targeted efforts to increase service use, helpseeking was especially unlikely among people suffering from specific phobia, as well as among men and older adults. Depression and Anxiety 0:1–9, 2011.  © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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