DSM-5 OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE AND RELATED DISORDERS: CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS OF NEW CRITERIA

Authors

  • Michael Van Ameringen M.D., F.R.C.P.C.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    • Correspondence to: Michael Van Ameringen, Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, McMaster University, 301 James St. S., Hamilton, ON L8P 3B5, Canada. E-mail: vanamer@mcmaster.ca

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  • Beth Patterson B.Sc.N., B.Ed.,

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
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  • William Simpson B.Sc.

    1. Department of Psychiatry and Behavioural Neurosciences, McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    2. MiNDS Neuroscience Graduate Program, St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton, McMaster University, Ontario, Canada
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Abstract

For the publication of DSM-5, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) was the subject of significant revisions to its classification and diagnostic criteria. One of these significant changes was the placement of OCD in a new category, “Obsessive-Compulsive and Related Disorders (OCRDs),” which also includes body dysmorphic disorder (BDD), trichotillomania (hair-pulling disorder), excoriation (skin-picking) disorder, hoarding disorder, substance/medication-induced OCRD, OCRD due to another medical condition, and other specified OCRDs. Changes in the diagnostic criteria and grouping of these disorders may have significant clinical implications, and will be reviewed in this article.

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