Cytological criteria for the diagnosis of intraductal hyperplasia, ductal carcinoma in situ, and invasive carcinoma of the breast

Authors

  • Anna M. Bofin M.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
    • Department of Laboratory Medicine, Children's and Women's Health, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, N-7006 Trondheim, Norway
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Stian Lydersen M.Sc., Ph.D.,

    1. Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Biology, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim, Norway
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Bjørn M. Hagmar M.D., Ph.D.

    1. Institute of Laboratory Medicine, National University Hospital, Oslo, Norway
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

The advent of mammography screening presents a diagnostic challenge to the cytopathologist as an increasing proportion of breast lesions requiring investigation will be nonpalpable and up to 40% will be accounted for by atypical intraductal hyperplasia and ductal carcinoma in situ, as opposed to previously, when these lesions represented less than 10% of palpable tumors. We studied 133 fine-needle aspirates from breast tumors and found that nuclear morphology, myoepithelial cells, signs of invasion, and degree of cellular dissociation are among the most potent factors discriminating between benign epithelial proliferations, atypical intraductal hyperplasia, ductal carcinoma in situ, and invasive carcinoma. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2004;31:207–215. © 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Ancillary