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Cytological significance of abnormal squamous cells in urinary cytology

Authors

  • Manabu Hattori C.M.I.A.C., Ph.D.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Clinical Cytology, School of Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0373, Japan
    • Department of Clinical Cytology, School of Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato University, 1-15-1 Kitasato, Minami-ku, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0373, Japan
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  • Yukari Nishimura C.T., I.A.C., Ph.D.,

    1. Department of Clinical Cytology, School of Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0373, Japan
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  • Masumi Toyonaga C.T., I.A.C.,

    1. Department of Pathology, Kitasato University Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0373, Japan
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  • Hirokuni Kakinuma C.T., I.A.C.,

    1. Department of Pathology, Kitasato University Hospital, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0373, Japan
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  • Kazumasa Matsumoto M.D.,

    1. Department of Urology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0373, Japan
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  • Makoto Ohbu M.D.

    1. Department of Pathology, School of Allied Health Sciences, Kitasato University, Sagamihara, Kanagawa 252-0373, Japan
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Abstract

The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of abnormal squamous cells (ASCs) in urinary cytology to clarify whether finding of ASCs could improve diagnostic accuracy. A total of 3,812 urine specimens were reviewed. We focused on three parameters of ASCs, necrotic debris, and ASC clusters, and linked them to histological diagnosis and clinical information. ASCs were identified in 34 (0.9%) specimens from 21 different patients. The incidence of ASCs was higher in females than in males. The 34 urine specimens were categorized as voided urine (16 cases), bladder-catheterized urine (17 cases), and bladder-washed fluid (1 case). Six (28.6%) of 21 patients were histologically diagnosed as having combined urothelial carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Eight patients (38.1%) were histologically diagnosed as having SCC originating from sites other than the urinary tract; those urine specimens showed ASCs that were likely to have been exfoliated from malignant lesions. Necrotic debris and ASC clusters were identified in 12 specimens (35.3%) from 11 patients and 4 specimens (11.8%) from 4 patients, respectively, from a total of 34 specimens. Our results indicate that a great amount of care is needed for cytological diagnosis when attempting to recognize ASCs in urine specimens because ASCs were identified in not only SCC of the bladder but also in carcinoma or nonmalignant lesions of nonurinary tracts. Necrotic debris was found not only in patients who had malignant bladder tumors but also in those who had malignant lesions in locations other than the bladder. Diagn. Cytopathol. 2012. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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