Argyrophil carcinoma of the breast: A cytologic, histochemical, and ultrastructural study of a case

Authors

  • K. A. Hussein M.B.Ch.B., M.R.C.Path.,

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Cytology, Dundee Royal Infirmary, and The Departments of Pathology and Surgery, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, United Kingdom
    • Department of Cytology, Dundee Royal Infirmary, Dundee DD1 9ND, United Kingdom
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  • D. S. A. Sanders M.B.Ch.B.,

    1. Department of Cytology, Dundee Royal Infirmary, and The Departments of Pathology and Surgery, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, United Kingdom
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  • P. E. Preece M.D., F.R.C.S.,

    1. Department of Cytology, Dundee Royal Infirmary, and The Departments of Pathology and Surgery, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, United Kingdom
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  • S. M. Hunter M.B.Ch.B.,

    1. Department of Cytology, Dundee Royal Infirmary, and The Departments of Pathology and Surgery, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, United Kingdom
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  • S. M. Nicoll M.B.Ch.B

    1. Department of Cytology, Dundee Royal Infirmary, and The Departments of Pathology and Surgery, Ninewells Hospital, Dundee, United Kingdom
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Abstract

Aspirate from an argyrophil carcinoma (“carcinoid”) of the breast showed malignant dispersed epithelial cells. With Diff-Quik, the cytoplasm was seen to be abundant, with prominent eosinophilic granularity. The nuclei were fairly uniform, round or oval, and eccentric and had a finely stippled chromatin pattern. On histology, the tumor appeared typical for argyrophil carcinoma, and staining with Grimelius for argyrophilic granules was positive. Membrane-bound neurosecretory granules were seen on electron microscopy.

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