Recovery of motor function after stroke

Authors

  • Nikhil Sharma,

    Corresponding author
    1. Human Cortical Physiology and Stroke Neurorehabilitation Section, NINDS, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland
    • Human Cortical Physiology and Stroke Neurorehabilitation Section, NINDS, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland.
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Leonardo G. Cohen

    Corresponding author
    1. Human Cortical Physiology and Stroke Neurorehabilitation Section, NINDS, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland
    • Human Cortical Physiology and Stroke Neurorehabilitation Section, NINDS, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland.
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

The human brain possesses a remarkable ability to adapt in response to changing anatomical (e.g., aging) or environmental modifications. This form of neuroplasticity is important at all stages of life but is critical in neurological disorders such as amblyopia and stroke. This review focuses upon our new understanding of possible mechanisms underlying functional deficits evidenced after adult-onset stroke. We review the functional interactions between different brain regions that may contribute to motor disability after stroke and, based on this information, possible interventional approaches to motor stroke disability. New information now points to the involvement of non-primary motor areas and their interaction with the primary motor cortex as areas of interest. The emergence of this new information is likely to impact new efforts to develop more effective neurorehabilitative interventions using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) that may be relevant to other neurological disorders such as amblyopia. © 2010 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Dev Psychobiol 54:254-262, 2012.

Ancillary