Continuous glucose monitoring: current clinical use

Authors


*Correspondence to:
Kun-Ho Yoon
Department of Internal Medicine,
The Catholic University of Korea,
Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital,
#505, Banpo-Dong, Seocho-Ku,
137-040 Seoul, Korea.
E-mail: yoonk@catholic.ac.kr

Summary

Four kinds of subcutaneous continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) machines have been currently introduced in clinical practice. These machines exhibit real-time glucose on the monitor every 5 minutes and have alarms to indicate hypoglycaemia and hyperglycaemia. However, thus far, there is no clear consensus about the clinical indications for CGM in actual clinical practice. CGM should be an ideal and powerful tool for monitoring glucose variability. Glycaemic variability has become a major concern over the years with growing evidence on its detrimental impact with respect to the risk of diabetic complications. Although the HbA1c level is ubiquitously measures in clinical practice, this level does not adequately represent glycaemic variability. Currently available evidence indicates that CGM aids in lowering the HbA1c level without increasing the incidence of severe hypoglycaemic episodes in patients with type 1 diabetes. Thus far, CGM has not been indicated for preventing severe hypoglycaemia or for treating type 2 diabetes because sufficient supporting evidence has not been obtained. Promising results have been obtained for the use of CGM for pregnant women with diabetes and for patients with hospital hyperglycaemia. Predictions regarding the feasibility of the closed-loop system have proven to be optimistic. CGM-integrated communication systems using information technology such as smart phone help controlling blood glucose more easily and effectively.

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