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Keywords:

  • type 2 diabetes;
  • obesity;
  • FBCx;
  • weight loss;
  • weight management;
  • cholesterol;
  • triglycerides;
  • adioponectin;
  • dietary fibre

Abstract

Backgrounds

Obesity and diabetes have become epidemic in the US. Dietary fibres have been reported to reduce the absorption of dietary fat, prevent weight gain, and reduce blood lipid levels. In the current double-blind study, obese patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited for a 3-month study to examine the health effects of a new dietary fibre, FBCx.

Methods

Sixty-six participants were recruited and were randomized into FBCx or placebo groups. They were instructed to take two 1-g tablets per fat-containing meal and not to change their eating patterns or daily routine. Three-day dietary records and fasting blood samples were collected prior to enrollment in the study and at the end of months 1, 2 and 3.

Results

Dietary records showed that some participants changed their eating patterns; therefore body weight data were adjusted according to energy intake. As a group, in the 30 days leading into the study, all participants experienced an average weight gain of 1.0 ± 0.4 kg, while those in the placebo group continued to gain weight during the study, those in the FBCx group maintained their weight. Those in the FBCx group required more energy to maintain their body weight while those in the placebo group required less (p < 0.05). Participants with hypertriglyceridemia showed a reduction (−0.48 ± 0.24 mmol/L, − 8.2%) in total cholesterol with FBCx, while those with placebo had an increase (0.24 ± 0.21 mmol/L, 5.2%, p < 0.05). Adiponectin was increased in the FBCx but reduced in the placebo group (p < 0.05).

Conclusions

FBCx has thus shown promising benefits in weight maintenance, a reduction of blood lipids and an increase in adiponectin levels. It can be easily incorporated into a diabetic management regimen. Copyright © 2006 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.