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Monitoring drug residues in donor blood/plasma samples using LC-(MS)/MS – a pilot study

Authors

  • Mario Thevis,

    Corresponding author
    1. European Monitoring Center for Emerging Doping Agents, Cologne/Bonn, Germany
    • Institute of Biochemistry - Center for Preventive Doping Research, German Sport University Cologne, Am Sportpark Müngersdorf 6, Cologne, Germany
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  • Oliver Krug,

    1. Institute of Biochemistry - Center for Preventive Doping Research, German Sport University Cologne, Am Sportpark Müngersdorf 6, Cologne, Germany
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  • Hans Geyer,

    1. Institute of Biochemistry - Center for Preventive Doping Research, German Sport University Cologne, Am Sportpark Müngersdorf 6, Cologne, Germany
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  • Folker Wenzel,

    1. Institute of Transplantation Diagnostics and Cell Therapeutics, University of Düsseldorf Medical School, Düsseldorf, Germany
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  • Jürgen Bux,

    1. German Red Cross – Blood Transfusion Service West, Hagen, Germany
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  • Linda Stahl,

    1. Institute of Cardiovascular Research and Sport Medicine – Department of Molecular and Cellular Sport Medicine, German Sport University Cologne, Germany
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  • Wildor Hollmann,

    1. Institute of Cardiovascular Research and Sport Medicine – Department of Molecular and Cellular Sport Medicine, German Sport University Cologne, Germany
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  • Andreas Thom,

    1. Institute of Biochemistry - Center for Preventive Doping Research, German Sport University Cologne, Am Sportpark Müngersdorf 6, Cologne, Germany
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  • Wilhelm Schänzer

    1. Institute of Biochemistry - Center for Preventive Doping Research, German Sport University Cologne, Am Sportpark Müngersdorf 6, Cologne, Germany
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Correspondence to: Mario Thevis, Institute of Biochemistry - Center for Preventive Doping Research, German Sport University Cologne, Am Sportpark Müngersdorf 6, 50933 Cologne, Germany. E-mail: m.thevis@biochem.dshs-koeln.de

Abstract

Quality assurance of pharmaceutical products is of particular importance and thoroughly controlled. Among these, the preparation of human plasma follows strict guidelines from the point of donor selection to product processing. While various precautions particularly concerning antiviral treatment as well as quality assessment are standard procedure, tests for drug residues are rarely, if at all, conducted with fresh frozen plasma products. With the constantly increasing sensitivity and specificity of modern analytical instruments, the detection of trace amounts of therapeutics in plasma is feasible and can be applied to blood products where considered appropriate. To estimate the prevalence of a selection of commonly prescribed and over-the-counter drugs (including diuretics, beta-receptor blocking agents, contraceptives, β2-agonists, antibiotics, antidepressants, analgesics, opioids, glucocorticosteroids, benzodiazepines, stimulants, and oral anti-diabetics) as well as cannabinoids in human donor plasma, a total of 100 specimens (61 female, 39 male) collected at the German Red Cross Organization in 2012 was subjected to an established analytical approach. The methodology was based on protein precipitation followed by liquid chromatographic-high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometric analysis. Following initial test results, confirmatory analyses were conducted with respective reference substances employing a conventional liquid chromatography-triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer (LC-MS/MS) apparatus. Out of one hundred samples, five were found to contain diuretics (four hydrochlorothiazide and one torasemide), five contained beta-receptor blocking agents (four bisoprolol and one metoprolol), one was found with residues of pseudoephedrine (stimulant) and one with drosperinone (contraceptive). Overall, 12% of samples yielded detectable amounts of drug residues at concentrations estimated to levels common to individuals under therapeutic treatment. In addition, six aliquots of different lots of commercially available plasma preparations with solvent-detergent processing were tested. Here, no drug residues of the targeted therapeutics were detected. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

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