Drug Testing and Analysis

Cover image for Drug Testing and Analysis

September 2010

Volume 2, Issue 9

Pages 417–454

  1. Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Perspectives
    3. Research Articles
    4. Correspondence Letters
    1. The role of banned substance residue analysis in the control of dietary supplement contamination (pages 417–420)

      Dr Catherine MG Judkins, Philip Teale and David J Hall

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.149

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      The role of banned substance testing of supplements will be reviewed and the results of such testing will be assessed against analytical findings from surveys of supplement products that do not undergo such testing. Appropriate quality control systems to minimise supplements being contaminated will also be discussed.

    2. The state of the art of residue analysis: the 6th VDRA symposium 2010 (pages 421–423)

      Prof. Dr H. F. De Brabander, J. Vanden Bussche, K. Wille, K. Bekaert and L. Vanhaecke

      Version of Record online: 13 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.164

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      The International Symposium on Hormone and Veterinary Drug Residue Analysis (VDRA) has become one of the leading European meetings for scientific and instrumental advances in residue analysis. Because of its initial location and organizing committee (Prof. C. Van Peteghem, Ghent University, Belgium), it is also called the “Ghent Conference”. The sixth VDRA edition consisted of plenary lectures, presented by invited speakers outstanding in the domain, contributed papers, and a technical exhibition hosted by companies presenting their latest instruments and related products. The Sixth VDRA was held in the new Ufo (University Forum) of Ghent University. In this manuscript the state of the art in residue analysis anno 2010, as brought forward during this symposium is described.

  2. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Perspectives
    3. Research Articles
    4. Correspondence Letters
    1. Towards disposable sensors for drug quality control: Dextromethorphan screen- printed electrodes (pages 424–429)

      Elmorsy Khaled, H. N. A. Hassan, Gehad G. Mohamed and Aly Eldin A. Seleim

      Version of Record online: 13 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.159

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      A simple, rapid, reliable and reproducible method for mass production of disposable sensors using screen-printing technology is described. The fabricated bi-electrode potentiometric strip containing both working and reference electrode was used as dextromethorphan (DXM) sensor. The proposed sensors worked satisfactorily in the concentration range from 10−5 to 10−2 mol L−1 with detection limit reaching 6 × 10−6 mol L−1 and adequate shelf lifetime of 8 months. DXM was determined in pharmaceutical formulations under batch and flow injection analysis (FIA) conditions with sampling output 120 h−1.

    2. Simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of chlordiazepoxide and clidinium using multivariate calibration techniques (pages 430–435)

      Mohammad Reza Khoshayand, Hamid Abdollahi, Ali Moeini, Ali Shamsaie, Alireza Ghaffari and Sepideh Abbasian

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.162

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      This study proves the feasibility of simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of chlordiazepoxide and clidinium in synthetic and pharmaceutical preparations without applying any extraction step in overlapped spectra with the aid of chemometric methods

    3. Electroanalysis of trimethoprim on metalloporphyrin incorporated glassy carbon electrode (pages 436–441)

      Leena Rajith and Krishnapillai Girish Kumar

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.161

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      Differential pulse voltammetric method using metalloporphyrin incorporated glassy carbon sensor for the determination of Trimethoprim was developed and the electroanalytical studies were performed and the method was applied successfully to real samples. The proposed method is advantageous in terms of the low detection limit, selectivity and sensitivity towards Trimethoprim.

    4. Development and validation of fixed-time method for the determination of isoxsuprine hydrochloride in commercial dosages forms (pages 442–446)

      Dr Nafisur Rahman and Nasheed Afaq

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.153

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      Development of kinetic spectrophotometric assay for isoxsuprine hydrochloride based on the reaction of the drug with hydroxylamine hydrochloride and ammonium cerium (IV) nitrate in sulphuric acid medium at room temperature which resulted in the formation of yellow colored product peaking at 380 nm. Fixed time method (ΔA = A4–A2) method was adopted for constructing the calibration curve.

    5. An experimental and computational study on the epimeric contribution to the infrared spectrum of budesonide (pages 447–451)

      H. R. H. Ali, H. G. M. Edwards, J. Kendrick, T. Munshi and I. J. Scowen

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.152

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      A detailed computational analysis of the effect of epimeric content of budesonide on its infrared spectrum in conjunction with powder X-ray diffractometry has been presented.

  3. Correspondence Letters

    1. Top of page
    2. Perspectives
    3. Research Articles
    4. Correspondence Letters
    1. Organic elemental analysis: a new universal approach to authenticity/quality control of pharmaceuticals (pages 452–454)

      Igor A. Revelsky, Elena S. Chernetsova, Boris P. Luzyanin, Marina V. Fedoseeva, Igor N. Glazkov and Alexander I. Revelsky

      Version of Record online: 1 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.154

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      The application of organic elemental analysis as a choice analytical tool for authenticity/quality control of pharmaceuticals is discussed.

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