Drug Testing and Analysis

Cover image for Vol. 5 Issue 1

Special Issue: Cannabinoids part I: Legal policies and physiological effects

January 2013

Volume 5, Issue 1

Pages 1–67

Issue edited by: Jim Kerwin

  1. Annual banned-substance review

    1. Top of page
    2. Annual banned-substance review
    3. Editorial
    4. Perspectives
    5. Review
    6. Perspectives
    7. Research article
    1. Annual banned-substance review: analytical approaches in human sports drug testing (pages 1–19)

      Mario Thevis, Tiia Kuuranne, Hans Geyer and Wilhelm Schänzer

      Article first published online: 10 DEC 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1441

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Detection assays for drugs and methods of sports doping published between 2011 and 2012 are critically reviewed and evaluated in context with the Prohibited List 2012 as established by the World Anti-Doping Agency.

  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Annual banned-substance review
    3. Editorial
    4. Perspectives
    5. Review
    6. Perspectives
    7. Research article
  3. Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Annual banned-substance review
    3. Editorial
    4. Perspectives
    5. Review
    6. Perspectives
    7. Research article
    1. Using dopamine research to generate rational cannabinoid drug policy (pages 22–26)

      G.C. Loewinger, E.B. Oleson and J.F. Cheer

      Article first published online: 18 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1410

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The recent rise in the recreational use of synthetic cannabinoids has been accompanied by a corresponding increase in regulation that may impede the development of cannabinoid drugs possessing therapeutic value. We recommend regulatory agencies revise policies that treat separate cannabinoid drug classes similarly and to curb regulation aimed at generally scheduling cannabinoid receptor agonists as Schedule I, as this ignores their medicinal properties. We futher recommend regulatory agencies consult the neuroscientific literature on cannabinoids when drafting regulatory policies.

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Annual banned-substance review
    3. Editorial
    4. Perspectives
    5. Review
    6. Perspectives
    7. Research article
    1. Marijuana, Spice 'herbal high', and early neural development: implications for rescheduling and legalization (pages 27–45)

      Delphine Psychoyos and K. Yaragudri Vinod

      Article first published online: 13 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1390

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      We review the literature indicating:

      • the presence of endocannabinoid system in the embryo/fetus during CNS development
      • the effects of gestational exposure to Δ9-THC, to the psychoactive components of Spice branded products and to cannabinoidt research chemicals on CNS development

      We address the implication of these findings in terms of the potential dangers of synthetic cannabinoid use during pregnancy, and the ongoing debate over legalization of marijuana.

  5. Perspectives

    1. Top of page
    2. Annual banned-substance review
    3. Editorial
    4. Perspectives
    5. Review
    6. Perspectives
    7. Research article
    1. Medical use of cannabis. Cannabidiol: A new light for schizophrenia? (pages 46–51)

      Serena Deiana

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1425

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A link exists between cannabis and schizophrenia: schizophrenic patients show a higher use of marijuana and its use can trigger psychotic episodes. THC is the main responsible for these effects. The cannabis plant also contains other cannabinoids: Cannabidiol, a non-psychotropic cannabinoid, has been receiving growing attention for its antipsychotic properties and may represent an alternative treatment for schizophrenia.

    2. Considering gender in cannabinoid research: A step towards personalized treatment of marijuana addicts (pages 57–61)

      Liana Fattore

      Article first published online: 11 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1401

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Drug addiction is a chronic relapsing illness that affects both women and men, and sex dependent differences have been frequently observed in the biological and behavioural effects of substances of abuse, including cannabis. A huge progress has been made during past decades in the addiction field, but research on origins, treatments and prevention of substance abuse disorders among women is still limited. Here, factors underlying gender differences in vulnerability to drug addiction and needs for gender-specific detoxification treatments are discussed.

  6. Research article

    1. Top of page
    2. Annual banned-substance review
    3. Editorial
    4. Perspectives
    5. Review
    6. Perspectives
    7. Research article
    1. Is today's marijuana more potent simply because it's fresher? (pages 62–67)

      Eric L. Sevigny

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1430

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Analyzes data from federally sponsored Potency Monitoring Program to assess the extent to which the observed increase in cannabis potency in the USA between 1970 and 2010 is a function of genuine shifts in illicit marijuana markets or testing artifacts related to changes in the quality of seized marijuana.

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