Drug Testing and Analysis

Cover image for Vol. 5 Issue 11-12

Special Issue: 31st Cologne workshop: Advances in sports drug testing

November-December 2013

Volume 5, Issue 11-12

Pages i–i, 809–899

  1. Cover picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Research articles
    5. Correspondence case reports
    6. Research articles
    7. Mini review
    1. Cover Picture (page i)

      Article first published online: 18 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1589

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  2. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Research articles
    5. Correspondence case reports
    6. Research articles
    7. Mini review
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  3. Research articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Research articles
    5. Correspondence case reports
    6. Research articles
    7. Mini review
    1. Expanding analytical possibilities concerning the detection of stanozolol misuse by means of high resolution/high accuracy mass spectrometric detection of stanozolol glucuronides in human sports drug testing (pages 810–818)

      Wilhelm Schänzer, Sven Guddat, Andreas Thomas, Georg Opfermann, Hans Geyer and Mario Thevis

      Article first published online: 19 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1516

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      Using liquid chromatography – high resolution/high accuracy tandem mass spectrometry and stanozolol O- and N-glucuronides as target analytes, detection windows for stanozolol abuse in sports were substantially prolonged. Employing this approach, numerous adverse analytical findings were observed recently, most of which would have remained undetected using earlier methodologies.

    2. Significant increase of salivary testosterone levels after single therapeutic transdermal administration of testosterone: suitability as a potential screening parameter in doping control (pages 819–825)

      Detlef Thieme, Claudia Rautenberg, Joachim Grosse and Martin Schoenfelder

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1536

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      There is a significant increase of testosterone concentrations in oral fluid after transdermal administration of testosterone gel or patches which appears to be a sensitive screening parameter for subsequent confirmation by isotope ratio MS.

    3. Screening of testosterone esters in human plasma (pages 826–833)

      G. Forsdahl, H.K. Vatne, T. Geisendorfer and G. Gmeiner

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1560

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      In doping control, the detection of an intact ester of testosterone in plasma would give an unequal proof of the administration of exogenous testosterone. A sensitive assay for the detection of nine testosterone esters in human plasma is presented.

    4. Metabolism of boldione in humans by mass spectrometric techniques: detection of pseudoendogenous metabolites (pages 834–842)

      Xavier de la Torre, Davide Curcio, Cristiana Colamonici, Francesco Molaioni and Francesco Botrè

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1567

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      Boldione is an anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) related to boldenone, androstenedione and testosterone included in the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) list of prohibited substances and methods. Boldione metabolism includes well known boldenone metabolites easily detectable by GC-MS and metabolites identical to the endogenously produced ones, formed after the reduction of the double bound in C1. A method based on gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) following urine purification by liquid chromatography (HPLC) permitted to confirm both the main synthetic like boldione/boldenone metabolite (17β-hydroxy-5β-androst-1-en-3-one) and boldenone at trace levels and to determine the exogenous origin of metabolites with the same chemical structure of the endogenous ones along a time window overlapping the detection of boldenone and its main metabolite.

    5. Biochemical markers of recombinant human insulin-like growth factor-I (rhIGF-I)/rhIGF binding protein-3 (rhIGFBP-3) misuse in athletes (pages 843–849)

      Nishan Guha, Ioulietta Erotokritou-Mulligan, Simon P. Nevitt, Michael Francis, Christiaan Bartlett, David A. Cowan, E. Eryl Bassett, Peter H. Sönksen and Richard I. G. Holt

      Article first published online: 31 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1562

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      Preliminary investigations into serum markers of insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) misuse are presented. Serum IGFBP-2, IGF-II and ALS may be useful markers of rhIGF-I/rhIGFBP-3 administration and are undergoing further evaluation.

  4. Correspondence case reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Research articles
    5. Correspondence case reports
    6. Research articles
    7. Mini review
    1. AOD-9604 does not influence the WADA hGH isoform immunoassay (pages 850–852)

      A. K. Orlovius, A. Thomas, W. Schänzer and M. Thevis

      Article first published online: 30 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1557

  5. Research articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Research articles
    5. Correspondence case reports
    6. Research articles
    7. Mini review
    1. Detection of small interfering RNA (siRNA) by mass spectrometry procedures in doping controls (pages 853–860)

      Andreas Thomas, Katja Walpurgis, Philippe Delahaut, Maxie Kohler, Wilhelm Schänzer and Mario Thevis

      Article first published online: 5 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1519

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      The potential misuse of siRNA for performance enhancement has become a realistic scenario in doping controls. The present study provides different analytical strategies to uncover siRNA doping by means of LC-HRMS and SDS-PAGE.

    2. Detection of recombinant EPO in blood and urine samples with EPO WGA MAIIA, IEF and SAR-PAGE after microdose injections (pages 861–869)

      Yvette Dehnes, Alexandra Shalina and Linda Myrvold

      Article first published online: 4 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1579

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      18 h post-injection, EPO WGA MAIIA could detect a dose of 7.5 IU/kg of rhEPO in blood and urine with 100% and 87.5% sensitivity, respectively. The results were confirmed with 100% specificity in urine and 87.5 % specificity in blood with SAR-PAGE. EPO WGA MAIIA has the potential to be a fast and sensitive supplemental screening assay for rhEPO in doping analysis.

    3. Desialylation improves the detection of recombinant erythropoietins in urine samples analyzed by SDS-PAGE (pages 870–876)

      Philippe Desharnais, Jean-François Naud and Christiane Ayotte

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1494

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      We have observed that the removal with neuraminidase of the sialic acid moieties from the different EPOs studied reduced their apparent molecular weight (MW) and increased the migration distance between huEPO and rhEPO centroids, therefore eliminating the size overlaps between them and improving the detection of rhEPO.

    4. Differences in sialic acid O-acetylation between human urinary and recombinant erythropoietins: a possible mass spectrometric marker for doping control (pages 877–889)

      Christian Reichel

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1563

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      This article presents the first worldwide data of human urinary erythropoietin (uhEPO) generated with a high resolution high accuracy mass spectrometer (LTQ-Orbitrap). Focus was on the tryptic O-glycopetide (E117-R131) and its degree of sialic acid O-acetylation. Data were compared with the results obtained of 40 recombinant human EPO (rhEPO) pharmaceuticals. Significant differences between uhEPO and all rhEPOs were observed. Only traces of O-acetylation were detectable on uhEPO and only in 100 IU of the purified protein.

    5. A population study of urine glycerol concentrations in elite athletes competing in North America (pages 890–895)

      Brian N. Kelly, Myke Madsen, Ken Sharpe, Vinod Nair and Daniel Eichner

      Article first published online: 24 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1537

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      Glycerol is a naturally occurring, prohibited substance potentially used by athletes in an effort to mask blood manipulation. Due to its endogenous nature, it is necessary to determine the threshold above which no athlete should naturally have a glycerol concentration in their urine. Data from a population (n = 959) study of urine glycerol concentrations present in anti-doping control samples collected from elite athletes competing in North America in various disciplines as well as competition status are presented in this manuscript.

  6. Mini review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover picture
    3. Editorial
    4. Research articles
    5. Correspondence case reports
    6. Research articles
    7. Mini review
    1. Meta-analysis: Effects of glycerol administration on plasma volume, haemoglobin, and haematocrit (pages 896–899)

      Karsten Koehler, Mario Thevis and Wilhelm Schaenzer

      Article first published online: 28 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1580

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      A meta-analysis was conducted to quantify the effects of glycerol hyperhydration on plasma volume, haemoglobin and haematocrit in comparison to administration of fluid only. The meta-analysis included seven studies and revealed that glycerol hyperhydration led to an increase in plasma volume of 3.3%, reductions in haemoglobin of 0.2 g/dl and no change in haematocrit.

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