Drug Testing and Analysis

Cover image for Vol. 5 Issue 5

May 2013

Volume 5, Issue 5

Pages 281–383

  1. Research articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Research articles
    3. Application notes
    4. Short communication
    5. Correspondence case report
    6. Correspondence letter
    1. Keeping pace with NPS releases: fast GC-MS screening of legal high products (pages 281–290)

      Mathieu P. Elie, Leonie E. Elie and Mark G. Baron

      Version of Record online: 7 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1434

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A fast GC-MS method for screening NPS is described and applied to 35 legal high products obtained from the Internet and head shops.

      The products do not always contain their stated ingredients and, of the group of products purchased as 5-IAI, not one contained this NPS.

    2. ‘Smoking’ mephedrone: The identification of the pyrolysis products of 4-methylmethcathinone hydrochloride (pages 291–305)

      Pierce Kavanagh, John O'Brien, John D Power, Brian Talbot and Seán D McDermott

      Version of Record online: 28 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1373

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      The substituted cathinone, mephedrone, is generally consumed orally or by snorting but reports indicate that it is also ingested by vaporization/inhalation (‘smoking’). This study examines the pyrolysis products produced by heating mephedrone under using simulated ‘meth pipe’ conditions. A variety of compounds are produced and there is evidence of thermal rearrangement, methylation, condensation/dimerization, halogenation and oxidative degradation.

    3. Detection of fluticasone propionate in horse plasma and urine following inhaled administration (pages 306–314)

      Bobby P. Gray, Simon Biddle, Clive M. Pearce and Lynn Hillyer

      Version of Record online: 18 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1329

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      Methods are presented for the sensitive detection of fluticasone propionate in horse plasma and a carboxylic acid metabolite in horse urine. Following an inhaled administration of FP, FP was detected in plasma for a minimum of 72 hours and FP-17βCOOH was detected in urine for approximately 18 hours. We believe this to be the first reported detection of FP-COOH in the horse.

    4. Application of artificial neural network to predict the retention time of drug metabolites in two-dimensional liquid chromatography (pages 315–319)

      H. Noorizadeh, S. Sobhan-Ardakani, F. Raoofi, M. Noorizadeh, S. S. Mortazavi, T. Ahmadi and K. Pournajafi

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.325

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Genetic algorithm and partial least square (GA-PLS) and Levenberg- Marquardt artificial neural network (L-M ANN) techniques were used to investigate the correlation between retention time and descriptors for drug metabolites which obtained by twodimensional liquid chromatography. The applied internal (leave-group-out cross validation (LGO-CV)) and external (test set) validation methods were used for the predictive power of four models. Both methods resulted in accurate prediction whereas more accurate results were obtained by L-M ANN model.

    5. QSRR using evolved artificial neural network for 52 common pharmaceuticals and drugs of abuse in hair from UPLC–TOF-MS (pages 320–324)

      Hadi Noorizadeh, Abbas Farmany, Hojat Narimani and Mehrab Noorizadeh

      Version of Record online: 8 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.309

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A QSRR study based on an ANN was carried out for the prediction of the UPLC-TOF-MS retention time (RT) of a set of 52 pharmaceuticals and drugs of abuse in hair. The results indicated that L-M ANN could be used as a powerful modeling tool for this research. A plot of predicted RT versus experimental RT values by L-M ANN for training set is shown in below figure.

    6. Improved partial least squares models for stability-indicating analysis of mebeverine and sulpiride mixtures in pharmaceutical preparation: A comparative study (pages 325–333)

      Hany W. Darwish and Ibrahim A. Naguib

      Version of Record online: 6 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.320

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bar plots for comparison of the RMSEP values obtained by application of the four adopted chemometric methods for the analysis of the independent test set Performance of PLSR is enhanced in the presented work by three multivariate modelling approaches including weighted regression PLS (Weighted-PLSR), genetic algorithm PLSR (GA-PLSR) and wavelet transform PLSR (WT-PLSR). The proposed models were investigated for their application to the stability indicating analysis of mixtures of mebeverine hydrochloride (meb) and sulpiride (sul) in presence of their reported impurities and degradation products. The work aims to compare these different chemometric methods, showing the underlying algorithm for each and making a comparison of analysis results.

    7. Validated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for determination of rosuvastatin in plasma at picogram level (pages 334–339)

      Ibrahim A. Darwish, Abdul-Rahman M. Al-Obaid and Hamoud A. Al-Malaq

      Version of Record online: 13 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.328

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      A sensitive ELISA has been developed and validated for determination of rosuvastatin in plasma samples at pictogram level based on a competitive binding immuno-reaction.

    8. A novel flow-injection chemiluminescence method for determination of andrographolide in andrographis tablets (pages 340–345)

      Zejun Jiang, Zaibin Hao, Qiong Wu, Yang Li, Hongyan Liu and Li Yan

      Version of Record online: 19 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1346

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel method for determination of andrographolide using flow-injection chemiluminescence (FI-CL) analysis is described in this paper. The chemiluminescence intensity of the solution was enhanced proportionally while the concentration of andrographolide increased. Under the selected experimental conditions, the calibration curve of andrographolide was linear within the range of 0.2 to 35.0 µg mL−1 with a linear equation of ΔI = 23.391x (µg mL−1) + 34.191, R2 = 0.9965.

    9. An ultrasensitive chemiluminescence immunoassay of chloramphenicol based on gold nanoparticles and magnetic beads (pages 346–352)

      Xiaoqi Tao, Haiyang Jiang, Xuezhi Yu, Jinghui Zhu, Xia Wang, Zhanhui Wang, Lanlan Niu, Xiaoping Wu and Jianzhong Shen

      Version of Record online: 19 MAR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1465

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract
      • Application of integration of the advantages of MBs and AuNPs in small molecule.
      • The LOD of the methods in milk for CAP were far lower than the MRPLs.
      • Two different extract methods for CAP have their own advantages.
    10. Spectrophotometric simultaneous determination of orotic acid, creatinine and uric acid by orthogonal signal correction-partial least squares in spiked real samples (pages 353–360)

      Habiboallah Khajehsharifi, Hossein Tavallali, Manzar Shekoohi and Maasumeh Sadeghi

      Version of Record online: 28 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.375

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An orthogonal-signal correction-partial least squares method was developed for the simultaneous spectrophotometric determination of orotic acid (OA), creatinine (CRE), and uric acid (UA) in spiked real samples.

      Calibration matrices contained 1.74–47.00 of OA, 1.13–33.95 of CRE, and 1.68–28.58 of UA in mg/ml. The number of principal component for OA, CRE, and UA with OSC were 3, 4, and 4. The proposed method was applied for the simultaneous determination of OA, CRE, and UA in real samples.

  2. Application notes

    1. Top of page
    2. Research articles
    3. Application notes
    4. Short communication
    5. Correspondence case report
    6. Correspondence letter
    1. Determination of cocaine, cocaine metabolites and cannabinoids in single hairs by MALDI Fourier transform mass spectrometry – preliminary results (pages 361–365)

      Frank Musshoff, Tabiwang Arrey and Kerstin Strupat

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1453

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      MALDI-FTMS as a useful procedure for drug testing in single hairs demonstrated for cocaine and THC in an authentic case.

    2. Optimization and validation of CEDIA drugs of abuse immunoassay tests in serum and urine on an Olympus AU 400 (pages 366–371)

      F. Musshoff, T. Wolters, S. Lott, J. Ippisch, S. Gradl and B. Madea

      Version of Record online: 6 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1454

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Optimization and validation of preliminary immunoassay tests with respect to the German per-se limits for driving under the influence of drugs (serum) and lowered cut-offs in cases of driving licence re-granting (urine).

  3. Short communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Research articles
    3. Application notes
    4. Short communication
    5. Correspondence case report
    6. Correspondence letter
    1. Adverse analytical findings with clenbuterol among U-17 soccer players attributed to food contamination issues (pages 372–376)

      Mario Thevis, Lina Geyer, Hans Geyer, Sven Guddat, Jiri Dvorak, Anthony Butch, Saskia S. Sterk and Wilhelm Schänzer

      Version of Record online: 4 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1471

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      During the FIFA U-17 World Cup in 2011, clenbuterol was detected in 109 out of 208 doping control samples. The findings were attributed to food contamination issues as corroborated by food analyses indicating the illicit use of clenbuterol as growth promoter and, as a consequence, the inadvertent ingestion of the drug by the athletes.

  4. Correspondence case report

    1. Top of page
    2. Research articles
    3. Application notes
    4. Short communication
    5. Correspondence case report
    6. Correspondence letter
  5. Correspondence letter

    1. Top of page
    2. Research articles
    3. Application notes
    4. Short communication
    5. Correspondence case report
    6. Correspondence letter
    1. Monitoring drug residues in donor blood/plasma samples using LC-(MS)/MS – a pilot study (pages 380–383)

      Mario Thevis, Oliver Krug, Hans Geyer, Folker Wenzel, Jürgen Bux, Linda Stahl, Wildor Hollmann, Andreas Thom and Wilhelm Schänzer

      Version of Record online: 21 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/dta.1457

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