Serosal mesothelium retains vasculogenic potential

Authors

  • Michiya Kawaguchi,

    1. Stahlman Research Laboratories, Program for Developmental Biology and Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Surgery, Kyoto University Hospital, Kyoto 606-8507, Japan
    Search for more papers by this author
  • David M. Bader,

    Corresponding author
    1. Stahlman Research Laboratories, Program for Developmental Biology and Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
    • Stahlman Research Laboratories, Program for Developmental Biology and Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, TN 37232
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Bettina Wilm

    1. Stahlman Research Laboratories, Program for Developmental Biology and Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Human Anatomy and Cell Biology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GE, UK
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Mesothelia comprise the epithelial covering of coelomic organs and line the cavities in which they are housed. Mesothelia contribute to the vasculature of the heart and the intestinal tract by developmental processes of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT), migration, and differentiation into endothelial cells, vascular smooth muscle cells, and pericytes. Here, we establish a novel in vitro system to analyze the differentiative potential of mesothelia. Using explants from serosal mesothelium (the mesothelial covering of the gut), we demonstrate that much of the developmental program observed in embryonic mesothelia is retained in the adult structure. Namely, processes of epithelial spreading, EMT, and differentiation into smooth muscle cells from these cells are observed. Interestingly, we were unable to stimulate endothelial cell differentiation using serum or various signaling factors. Taken together, these data reveal that differentiated serosal cells retain vasculogenic potential and provide a generalizable model for future studies on the developmental and differentiative capacity of the mesothelial cell type. Developmental Dynamics 236:2973–2979, 2007. © 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

Ancillary