Temporal and spatial expression of collagens during murine atrioventricular heart valve development and maintenance

Authors

  • Jacqueline D. Peacock,

    1. Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida
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  • Yinhui Lu,

    1. Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell-Matrix Research, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
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  • Manuel Koch,

    1. Center for Biochemistry and Department of Dermatology, Medical Faculty, University of Cologne, Cologne, Germany
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  • Karl E. Kadler,

    1. Wellcome Trust Centre for Cell-Matrix Research, Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom
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  • Joy Lincoln

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, Florida
    • Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Leonard M. Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, 1600 NW 10th Avenue, Miami, FL, 33136
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Abstract

Heart valve function is achieved by organization of matrix components including collagens, yet the distribution of collagens in valvular structures is not well defined. Therefore, we examined the temporal and spatial expression of select fibril-, network-, beaded filament-forming, and FACIT collagens in endocardial cushions, remodeling, maturing, and adult murine atrioventricular heart valves. Of the genes examined, col1a1, col2a1, and col3a1 transcripts are most highly expressed in endocardial cushions. Expression of col1a1, col1a2, col2a1, and col3a1 remain high, along with col12a1 in remodeling valves. Maturing neonate valves predominantly express col1a1, col1a2, col3a1, col5a2, col11a1, and col12a1 within defined proximal and distal regions. In adult valves, collagen protein distribution is highly compartmentalized, with ColI and ColXII observed on the ventricular surface and ColIII and ColVa1 detected throughout the leaflets. Together, these expression data identify patterning of collagen types in developing and maintained heart valves, which likely relate to valve structure and function. Developmental Dynamics 237:3051–3058, 2008. © 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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