Identification of embryonic pancreatic genes using Xenopus DNA microarrays

Authors

  • Tadayoshi Hayata,

    1. Department of Developmental and Cell Biology, University of California, Irvine, California
    Current affiliation:
    1. Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Medical Research Institute, Tokyo Medical & Dental University, 2-3-10 Kanda-surugadai, Chiyoda-ku, Tokyo 101-0062, Japan
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    • Drs. Hayata, Blitz, and Ms. Iwata contributed equally to this work.

  • Ira L. Blitz,

    1. Department of Developmental and Cell Biology, University of California, Irvine, California
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    • Drs. Hayata, Blitz, and Ms. Iwata contributed equally to this work.

  • Nahoko Iwata,

    1. Department of Developmental and Cell Biology, University of California, Irvine, California
    Current affiliation:
    1. Leonard Davis School of Gerontology, University of Southern California 3715 McClintock Avenue, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0191
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    • Drs. Hayata, Blitz, and Ms. Iwata contributed equally to this work.

  • Ken W.Y. Cho

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Developmental and Cell Biology, University of California, Irvine, California
    • Department of Developmental and Cell Biology, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-2305
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Abstract

The pancreas is both an exocrine and endocrine endodermal organ involved in digestion and glucose homeostasis. During embryogenesis, the anlagen of the pancreas arise from dorsal and ventral evaginations of the foregut that later fuse to form a single organ. To better understand the molecular genetics of early pancreas development, we sought to isolate markers that are uniquely expressed in this tissue. Microarray analysis was performed comparing dissected pancreatic buds, liver buds, and the stomach region of tadpole stage Xenopus embryos. A total of 912 genes were found to be differentially expressed between these organs during early stages of organogenesis. K-means clustering analysis predicted 120 of these genes to be specifically enriched in the pancreas. Of these, we report on the novel expression patterns of 24 genes. Our analyses implicate the involvement of previously unsuspected signaling pathways during early pancreas development. Developmental Dynamics 238:1455–1466, 2009. © 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

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