Distinct roles of MicroRNAs in epithelium and mesenchyme during tooth development

Authors

  • Shelly Oommen,

    1. Craniofacial Development and Stem cell biology, and Biomedical Research Centre, Dental Institute, King's College London, Guy's Hospital, London Bridge, London, United Kingdom
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    • Drs. Oommen and Otsuka-Tanaka contributed equally to this work.

  • Yoko Otsuka-Tanaka,

    1. Craniofacial Development and Stem cell biology, and Biomedical Research Centre, Dental Institute, King's College London, Guy's Hospital, London Bridge, London, United Kingdom
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    • Drs. Oommen and Otsuka-Tanaka contributed equally to this work.

  • Najam Imam,

    1. Craniofacial Development and Stem cell biology, and Biomedical Research Centre, Dental Institute, King's College London, Guy's Hospital, London Bridge, London, United Kingdom
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  • Maiko Kawasaki,

    1. Craniofacial Development and Stem cell biology, and Biomedical Research Centre, Dental Institute, King's College London, Guy's Hospital, London Bridge, London, United Kingdom
    2. Division of Bio-Prosthodontics, Department of Oral Health Science, Course for Oral Life Science, Niigata University Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Niigata, Japan
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  • Katsushige Kawasaki,

    1. Craniofacial Development and Stem cell biology, and Biomedical Research Centre, Dental Institute, King's College London, Guy's Hospital, London Bridge, London, United Kingdom
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  • Farnoosh Jalani-Ghazani,

    1. Craniofacial Development and Stem cell biology, and Biomedical Research Centre, Dental Institute, King's College London, Guy's Hospital, London Bridge, London, United Kingdom
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  • Angela Anderegg,

    1. Department of Neurology and Center for Genetic Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg Medical School, Chicago, Illinois
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  • Rajeshwar Awatramani,

    1. Department of Neurology and Center for Genetic Medicine, Northwestern University Feinberg Medical School, Chicago, Illinois
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  • Robert Hindges,

    1. MRC Centre for Developmental Neurobiology, King's College London, New Hunt's House, Guy's Campus, London, United Kingdom
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  • Paul T. Sharpe,

    Corresponding author
    1. Craniofacial Development and Stem cell biology, and Biomedical Research Centre, Dental Institute, King's College London, Guy's Hospital, London Bridge, London, United Kingdom
    • Department of Craniofacial Development, Floor 27, Dental Institute, Guy's Hospital, London Bridge, London, SE1 9RT UK
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  • Atsushi Ohazama

    1. Craniofacial Development and Stem cell biology, and Biomedical Research Centre, Dental Institute, King's College London, Guy's Hospital, London Bridge, London, United Kingdom
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Abstract

Background: Tooth development is known to be mediated by the cross-talk between signaling pathways, including Shh, Fgf, Bmp, and Wnt. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are 19- to 25-nt noncoding small single-stranded RNAs that negatively regulate gene expression by binding target mRNAs, which is believed to be important for the fine-tuning signaling pathways in development. To investigate the role of miRNAs in tooth development, we examined mice with either mesenchymal (Wnt1Cre/Dicerfl/fl) or epithelial (ShhCre/Dicerfl/fl) conditional deletion of Dicer, which is essential for miRNA processing. Results: By using a CD1 genetic background for Wnt1Cre/Dicerfl/fl, we were able to examine tooth development, because the mutants retained mandible and maxilla primordia. Wnt1Cre/Dicerfl/fl mice showed an arrest or absence of teeth development, which varied in frequency between incisors and molars. Extra incisor tooth formation was found in ShhCre/Dicerfl/fl mice, whereas molars showed no significant anomalies. Microarray and in situ hybridization analysis identified several miRNAs that showed differential expression between incisors and molars. Conclusion: In tooth development, miRNAs thus play different roles in epithelium and mesenchyme, and in incisors and molars. Developmental Dynamics 241:1465–1472, 2012. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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