Na+/H+ exchanger 1 (NHE1) function is necessary for maintaining mammary tissue architecture

Authors

  • Edmund C. Jenkins Jr.,

    1. Department of Biology, College of Staten Island, Staten Island, New York
    2. Biology Doctoral Program, City University of New York Graduate Center, New York, New York
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  • Shawon Debnath,

    1. Department of Biology, College of Staten Island, Staten Island, New York
    2. Biochemistry Doctoral Program, City University of New York Graduate Center, New York, New York
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  • Sophia Varriano,

    1. Department of Biology, College of Staten Island, Staten Island, New York
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  • Stephen Gundry,

    1. Electrical Engineering Doctoral Program, City College of New York, The City University of New York, New York, New York
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  • Jimmie E. Fata

    Corresponding author
    1. Department of Biology, College of Staten Island, Staten Island, New York
    2. Biology Doctoral Program, City University of New York Graduate Center, New York, New York
    3. Biochemistry Doctoral Program, City University of New York Graduate Center, New York, New York
    • Correspondence to: Dr. Jimmie Fata, Dept. of Biology, College of Staten Island, City University of New York, 2800 Victory Blvd, Staten Island, NY 10314. E-mail: jimmie.fata@csi.cuny.edu

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Abstract

Background: The mammary gland is an ideal model to study the link between form and function in normal tissue. Perhaps as interesting as the cues necessary to generate this structure are the signals required to maintain its branched architecture over the lifetime of the organism, since likely these pathways are de-regulated in malignancies. Previously, we have shown that the Na+/H+ exchanger 1 (NHE1), a critical regulator of intracellular pH, was necessary for mammary branching morphogenesis. Here we provide strong evidence that NHE1 function is also necessary for maintaining mammary branched architecture. Results: Inhibition of NHE1 with 5-N-Methy-N-isobutyl amiloride (MIA) on branched structures resulted in a rapid (within 24 hr) and reversible loss of branched architecture that was not accompanied by any overt changes in cell proliferation or cell death. NHE1 inhibition led to a significant acidification of intracellular pH in the branched end buds that preceded a number of events, including altered tissue polarity of myoepithelial cells, loss of NHE1 basal polarity, F-actin rearrangements, and decreased E-cadherin expression. Conclusions: Our results implicate NHE1 function and intracellular pH homeostasis as key factors that maintain mammary tissue architecture, thus, indirectly allowing for mammary function as a milk-providing (form) and -producing (function) gland. Developmental Dynamics 243:229–242, 2014. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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