Combination of in ovo electroporation and time-lapse imaging to study migrational events in chicken embryos

Authors

  • Maryna Masyuk,

    1. Institute of Anatomy, Department of Anatomy and Molecular Embryology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany
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  • Gabriela Morosan-Puopolo,

    1. Institute of Anatomy, Department of Anatomy and Molecular Embryology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany
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  • Beate Brand-Saberi,

    1. Institute of Anatomy, Department of Anatomy and Molecular Embryology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany
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    • Drs. Brand-Saberi and Theiss contributed equally to this work.

  • Carsten Theiss

    Corresponding author
    1. Institute of Anatomy, Department of Anatomy and Molecular Embryology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany
    2. Institute of Anatomy, Department of Cytology, Ruhr-University Bochum, Bochum, Germany
    • Correspondence to: Carsten Theiss, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Anatomy, Department of Cytology, Ruhr-University Bochum, 44780 Bochum, Germany. E-mail: carsten.theiss@rub.de

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    • Drs. Brand-Saberi and Theiss contributed equally to this work.


Abstract

Background: During embryonic development cell migration plays a principal role in several processes. In past decades, many studies were performed to investigate migrational events, occurring during embryonic organogenesis, neurogenesis, gliogenesis or myogenesis, just to name a few. Although different common techniques are already used for this purpose, one of their major limitations is the static character. However, cell migration is a sophisticated and highly dynamic process, wherefore new appropriate technologies are required to investigate this event in all its complexity. Results and Conclusions: Here we report a novel approach for dynamic analysis of cell migration within embryonic tissue. We combine the modern transfection method of in ovo electroporation with the use of tissue slice culture and state-of-the-art imaging techniques, such as confocal laser scanning microscopy or spinning disc confocal microscopy, and thus, develop a method to study live the migration of myogenic precursors in chicken embryos. The conditions and parameters used in this study allow long-term imaging for up to 24 hr. Our protocol can be easily adapted for investigations of a variety of other migrational events and provides a novel conception for dynamic analysis of migration during embryonic development. Developmental Dynamics 243:690–698, 2014. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

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