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Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 241 Issue 10

October 2012

Volume 241, Issue 10

Pages 1507–1649

  1. Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      In vivo notch reactivation in differentiating cochlear hair cells induces sox2 and prox1 expression but does not disrupt hair cell maturation

      Zhiyong Liu, Thomas Owen, Jie Fang, R. Sathish Srinivasan and Jian Zuo

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23863

  2. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      Highlights in DD

      Julie C. Kiefer

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23848

  3. ArtPix

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      DD ArtPix

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23864

  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      Dynamic skeletogenesis in fishes: Insight of exercise training on developmental plasticity (pages 1507–1524)

      Thomas Grünbaum, Richard Cloutier and Bruno Vincent

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23837

      Key findings:

      • Different properties of developmental events (i.e., onset, offset, relative sequences, and trajectories) might be influenced epigenetically by changes in environmental conditions (e.g., differential water velocity).

      • Developmental plasticity of skeletal events is shown by changes in their timing of onset and in their developmental progress with respect to environmental conditions.

      • The onset of cartilage formation (chondrification) is less influenced than the onset of bone formation (ossification) by differential water velocity.

      • Changes in environmental conditions have only minor effects on the relative order of skeletal events (developmental sequences) and their cumulative addition through time (developmental trajectories).

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      Mapping differentiation kinetics in the mouse retina reveals an extensive period of cell cycle protein expression in post-mitotic newborn neurons (pages 1525–1544)

      Marek Pacal and Rod Bremner

      Version of Record online: 13 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23840

      Key findings:

      • The pan cell cycle markers Pcna, Mcm6, and Ki67 are detectable beyond cell birth in post-mitotic neurons

      • Ki67 is not extinguished until 10–22 h after final mitosis, coincident with the migration of newborn ganglion and amacrine cells out of the neuroblastic layer.

      • Timing between cell birth and induction of neuronal markers or disappearance of Ki67 lengthens across development.

      • Typical G2/M extends from ∼1 h at mouse embryonic day 12.5 to ∼2 h by birth, but in a small fraction of progenitors it is double these lengths.

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      Cdc42 GTPase and Rac1 GTPase act downstream of p120 catenin and require GTP exchange during gastrulation of zebrafish mesoderm (pages 1545–1561)

      Cynthia L. Hsu, Claire P. Muerdter, Abhay D. Knickerbocker, Ryan M. Walsh, Martha A. Zepeda-Rivera, Kevin H. Depner, Maya Sangesland, Trinidad B. Cisneros, Ju Youn Kim, Patricia Sanchez-Vazquez, Lidia Cherezova, Rainy D. Regan, Nadia M. Bahrami, Elizabeth A. Gray, Andrew Y. Chan, Terry Chen, Milly Y. Rao and Merrill B. Hille

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23847

      Key findings

      • p120 catetin is required for extension of the dorsal axis and normal migration of the presomitic mesoderm.

      • Cdc42 and Rac1 GTPases are downstream of p120 catenin δ1 signaling and require exchange of GTP for GDP.

      • Local stimulation of the exchange of GTP for GDP in Cdc42 and Rac GTPases mediates directional migration of the presomitic mesoderm.

      • A balance of the amount of p120 catenin δ1 and localized activation or turnover of Cdc42, Rac1, and Rho GTPase are required for normal zebrafish cell migration.

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      Differential regulation of axonal growth and neuromuscular junction assembly by HGF/c-Met signaling (pages 1562–1574)

      Pan P. Li, Raghavan Madhavan and H. Benjamin Peng

      Version of Record online: 28 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23845

      Key Findings:

      • HGF-stimulation of c-Met promotes motor axon growth.

      • HGF and c-Met suppress axonal filopodia.

      • Presynaptic HGF/c-Met signaling hinders NMJ formation.

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      Lens regenerates by means of similar processes and timeline in adults and larvae of the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster (pages 1575–1583)

      Takeshi Inoue, Ryo Inoue, Rio Tsutsumi, Kikuo Tada, Yuko Urata, Chiaki Michibayashi, Shota Takemura and Kiyokazu Agata

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23854

      Key findings:

      • Although larval lenses in the newts complete the regeneration process faster than adults, mechanisms and cellular process are the same in larvae and in adults.

      • The difference of the regenerating speed between larvae and adults is not due to an accelerated timeline of regenerative events but rather to the difference in the size of the final lens that needs to be formed.

      • Combination of the transgenic techniques and larval newts may increase the speed and efficiency of genetic analysis of regeneration biology in vertebrates.

  5. Techniques

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      A simple and novel method for RNA-seq library preparation of single cell cDNA analysis by hyperactive Tn5 transposase (pages 1584–1590)

      Scott Brouilette, Scott Kuersten, Charles Mein, Monika Bozek, Anna Terry, Kerith-Rae Dias, Leena Bhaw-Rosun, Yasunori Shintani, Steven Coppen, Chiho Ikebe, Vinit Sawhney, Niall Campbell, Masahiro Kaneko, Nobuko Tano, Hidekazu Ishida, Ken Suzuki and Kenta Yashiro

      Version of Record online: 28 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23850

      Key findings

      • Tn5 transposase-mediated library preparation for next generation sequencing requires only at most 100 ng of ds-cDNA with a few steps of enzymatic reactions.

      • Tn5 transposase-mediated library preparation provides reproducible size distribution of the libraries.

      • Tn5 transposase-mediated library preparation produces data of RNA-seq comparable to those from the traditional method.

  6. Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Characterization and functional study of a cluster of four highly conserved orphan adhesion-GPCR in mouse (pages 1591–1602)

      Simone Prömel, Helen Waller-Evans, John Dixon, Dirk Zahn, William H. Colledge, Joanne Doran, Mark B.L. Carlton, Johannes Grosse, Torsten Schöneberg, Andreas P. Russ and Tobias Langenhan

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23841

      Key findings

      • The cluster of four adhesion-GPCR Gpr110, Gpr111, Gpr115, and Gpr116 is highly conserved in vertebrate evolution.

      • Gpr116 is expressed ubiquitously in mice tissue, Gpr110 is strongly expressed in the renal pelvis.

      • Gpr111 and Gpr115 are redundantly expressed in squamous epithelia in mice.

      • Gpr111 and Gpr115 are expressed during embryonic development in the skin starting at embryonic day 12 with the formation of the basal layer of the skin.

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      Expression and retinoic acid regulation of the zebrafish nr2f orphan nuclear receptor genes (pages 1603–1615)

      Crystal E. Love and Victoria E. Prince

      Version of Record online: 13 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23838

      Key findings:

      • Zebrafish nr2f1a, nr2f1b, nr2f2, and nr2f5 show dynamic expression during development.

      • RA and Fgf signals are not required for the onset of nr2f hindbrain expression.

      • RA positively regulates nr2f1a in the trunk endoderm and mesoderm.

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      Spatiotemporal regulation of keratin 5 and 17 in the axolotl limb (pages 1616–1624)

      Miyuki Moriyasu, Aki Makanae and Akira Satoh

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23839

      Key findings:

      • Keratins 5 and 17 were up-regulated in axolotl limb regeneration.

      • Keratin 5 expression was suppressed in the basal layer of the blastema epithelium.

      • Suppression of Keratin5 in the basal layer was correlated to blastema differentiation.

      • Expression of keratins 5 and 17 was correlated with nerve presence.

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      Posttraumatic regeneration involves differential expression of long terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons (pages 1625–1636)

      Vladimir S. Mashanov, Olga R. Zueva and José E. García-Arrarás

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23844

      Key findings:

      • Posttraumatic regeneration in an echinoderm involves significant differential expression of LTR retrotransposons.

      • Transcripts of one of the most significantly over-expressed retroelements, Gypsy1_Hg, were detected in the neurons and glial cells of the regenerating central nervous system.

      • Gypsy1_Hg-positive cells avoided cell death and contributed to regeneration.

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      Comparative spatiotemporal analysis of Hox gene expression in early stages of intermediate mesoderm formation (pages 1637–1649)

      Hila Barak, Ella Preger-Ben Noon and Ram Reshef

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23853

      Key findings

      • Hoxb4 is expressed at the onset of the pronephros progenitor cells and keep expressed during their migration to the final destination in the intermediate mesoderm.

      • Several Hox genes demonstrate independent expression patterns at early developmental stages that do not follow temporal and spatial colinearity.

      • Paraxial and intermediate mesodermal tissues share the same expression patterns for most of the examined genes suggesting common mesodermal development origin.

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