You have free access to this content

Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 241 Issue 11

November 2012

Volume 241, Issue 11

Pages 1651–1839

  1. Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Perspective
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Normalized shape and location of perturbed craniofacial structures in the Xenopus tadpole reveal an innate ability to achieve correct morphology

      Laura N. Vandenberg, Dany S. Adams and Michael Levin

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23883

      Key findings:

      • Craniofacial perturbations in the Xenopus tadpole become normalized over time.

      • The jaw and branchial arches achieve both normal position and morphology. Eyes, nose and otoliths achieve normal position but varying degrees of normal morphology.

      • Two parameters, distance from the brain and angle from the midline, define normal position of craniofacial structures. Perturbed structures eventually achieve normal values for these parameters even though they start from abnormal initial conditions.

      • These results shed light on the information processing and decision-making processes that underlie biological tissues' innate ability to repair deformities.

  2. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Perspective
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Highlights in DD

      Julie C. Kiefer

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23869

  3. ArtPix

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Perspective
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      DD ArtPix

      Version of Record online: 17 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23884

  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Perspective
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Ectopic expression of Fgf3 leads to aberrant lineage segregation in the mouse parthenote preimplantation embryos (pages 1651–1664)

      Yi-Hui Chen and John Yu

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23851

      Key findings

      • Molecular mechanisms of the developmental defects of parthenogenetic embryos were unraveled.

      • Decreased Sox2+ and Nanog+ epiblast cells but increased Gata4+ primitive endoderm cells were observed in the parthenogenetic inner cell mass.

      • Ectopic Gata4 expression and reduced Elf5 and Tbr2(Eomes) expression were observed in the parthenogenetic trophectoderm.

      • Up-regulation of Fgfr2 phosphorylation leads to increased Gata4 and decreased Nanog expression in parthenotes.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Developmental tracing of luteinizing hormone β-subunit gene expression using green fluorescent protein transgenic medaka (Oryzias latipes) reveals a putative novel developmental function (pages 1665–1677)

      Jon Hildahl, Guro K. Sandvik, Rikke Lifjeld, Kjetil Hodne, Yoshitaka Nagahama, Trude M. Haug, Kataaki Okubo and Finn Arne Weltzien

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23860

      Key findings:

      • The lhb gene is maternally expressed in medaka embryos and zygotic expression peaks during the six-somite stage, approximately 36 hr postfertilization.

      • The lhb gene is regulated in the developing gut tube during Japanese medaka embryogenesis.

      • Lhb-GFP is first detected in the pituitary by 2 weeks postfertilization.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Comprehensive timeline of mesodermal development in the quail small intestine (pages 1678–1694)

      Rebecca T. Thomason, David M. Bader and Nichelle I. Winters

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23855

      Key Findings:

      • A comprehensive description of development of the mesoderm from generation of the primordium into adulthood is presented.

      • Intestinal mesoderm development occurs in four major phases: establishment of the primordium, generation of the mesenchyme, closure of the gut tube, and maturation of visceral muscle and vasculature.

      • Novel spatial and temporal associations are identified throughout each developmental phase.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Identification of E2F target genes that are rate limiting for dE2F1-dependent cell proliferation (pages 1695–1707)

      Anabel Herr, Michelle Longworth, Jun-Yuan Ji, Michael Korenjak, David M. MacAlpine and Nicholas J. Dyson

      Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23857

      Key findings:

      • We have used a list of E2F-regulated genes that has been generated by microarray analysis for a genetic approach to ask which of these targets are important for E2F function in vivo.

      • Our results show that more than half of the genes tested are able to dominantly modify dE2F1-dependent phenotypes, indicating that the expression levels of most dE2F1-regulated genes are rate-limiting for dE2F1 function.

      • We show that the depletion of Orc5 elevates the expression of a dE2F1-regulated gene.

      • Our results reveal the existence of an important feedback mechanism that can elevate dE2F1-dependent transcription in cells where ORC levels are low.

    5. You have free access to this content
      Molecular studies on the roles of Runx2 and Twist1 in regulating FGF signaling (pages 1708–1715)

      Yongbo Lu, Yucheng Li, Adriana C. Cavender, Suzhen Wang, Alka Mansukhani and Rena N. D'Souza

      Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23858

      Key findings:

      • Twist1 forms heterodimers with ubiquitously expressed E12 and synergistically stimulates Fgfr2 and Fgf10 promoter activities.

      • E12 prevents Twist1 from undergoing lysosomal degradation.

      • Runx2 has no direct effects on Fgfr2 and Fgf10 promoter activities, but it inhibited the stimulatory effects of Twist1 on Fgfr2 promoter.

      • A relative abundance of unbound Twist1, due to Runx2 haploinsufficiency, may lead to elevated FGF signaling, and subsequently the formation of supernumerary teeth in human CCD.

    6. You have free access to this content
      Pax2 modulates proliferation during specification of the otic and epibranchial placodes (pages 1716–1728)

      Sabine Freter, Yuko Muta, Paul O'Neill, Vassil S. Vassilev, Shigehiro Kuraku and Raj K. Ladher

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23856

      Key Findings

      • Neither suppression nor over-expression of Pax2 affects the extent of the precursor region of the inner ear and epibranchial placodes, the PPA.

      • Suppressing and over-expressing Pax2 does affect the differentiation of the inner ear and the epibranchial placodes.

      • Pax2 suppression reduces proliferation of PPA precursors.

    7. You have free access to this content
      Assessing the critical period for Rho kinase activity during Drosophila ventral furrow formation (pages 1729–1743)

      Melissa M. Krajcovic and Jonathan S. Minden

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23859

      Key findings:

      • Inhibition of Rho kinase by Y-27632 injection before the start of ventral furrow formation (VFF) blocks the completion of VFF, but not the initial steps of VFF.

      • There is a brief critical period for the requirement of Rho kinase activity, hence myosin II activity, during the concerted apical constriction phase of VFF.

      • VFF processes outside of this critical period do not require Rho kinase or myosin II activity.

    8. You have free access to this content
      The regulation of endogenous retinoic acid level through CYP26B1 is required for elevation of palatal shelves (pages 1744–1756)

      Junko Okano, Wataru Kimura, Virginia E. Papaionnou, Naoyuki Miura, Gen Yamada, Kohei Shiota and Yasuo Sakai

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23862

      Key findings

      • CYP26B1 is essential to degrade retinoic acid (RA) in the normal developing palate.

      • Excess RA targets cells in the bend region of palatal shelves, leading to a failure of the horizontal elevation of palatal shelves.

      • The absence of Cyp26b1 results in the suppression of Fgf10, Bmp2, and Tbx1 expression in the bend region of palatal shelves.

      • The deletion of Cyp26b1 also prevents the differentiation of tongue musculature, which affects tongue withdrawal necessary for horizontal elevation of palatal shelves.

    9. You have free access to this content
      Cleft palate defect of Dlx1/2−/− mutant mice is caused by lack of vertical outgrowth in the posterior palate (pages 1757–1769)

      Juhee Jeong, Jeffry Cesario, Yangu Zhao, Lorel Burns, Heiner Westphal and John L.R. Rubenstein

      Version of Record online: 28 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23867

      Key findings:

      • We investigated the etiology underlying cleft palate of mouse Dlx1/2−/− mutants.

      • The posterior palate failed to grow in these mutants from the onset of palatogenesis.

      • Cell proliferation rate and Cyclin D1 expression were reduced in the mutant posterior palate.

      • Expression of multiple known regulators of palatogenesis was affected in the mutants.

      • We conclude that Dlx1 and Dlx2 are crucial for early stages of palatogenesis.

    10. You have free access to this content
      Nonmuscle myosin II regulation of lung epithelial morphology (pages 1770–1781)

      Erin J. Plosa, Kimberly A. Gooding, Roy Zent and Lawrence S. Prince

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23866

      Key findings:

      • Epithelial cell orientations occur in four predictable orientations; tetrahedral, linear, rosette, and discontinuous.

      • Nonmuscle myosin II-C colocalizes with both alveolar type I and type II epithelial cells.

      • Inhibition of NM II increases airway branch formation and peripheral airway size.

      • Inhibition of NM II increases epithelial cell size and anisotropy.

      • Blebbistatin increases migration of cultured epithelial cells.

    11. You have free access to this content
      Membrane β-catenin and adherens junctions in early gonadal patterning (pages 1782–1798)

      Alice Fleming, Negar Ghahramani, Maggie Xiaoming Zhu, Emmanuèle C. Délot and Eric Vilain

      Version of Record online: 5 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23870

      Key findings:

      • Key components of adherens junctions (AJs) are co-expressed in the gonad over the course of early sex determination and development.

      • β-Catenin colocalizes at the membrane with p120 catenin and with distinct, cell-specific cadherin subtypes.

      • The distribution of AJ components precisely correlates with patterning of both the testis and ovary.

  5. Perspective

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Perspective
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Global posterior prevalence is unique to vertebrates: A dance to the music of time? (pages 1799–1807)

      A.J. Durston

      Version of Record online: 17 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23852

      Key findings:

      • Global posterior prevalence is unique to vertebrates.

  6. Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Perspective
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Laminin and integrin expression in the ventral ectodermal ridge of the mouse embryo: Implications for regulation of BMP signalling (pages 1808–1815)

      Beatriz Lopez-Escobar, Beatriz De Felipe, Jose Antonio Sanchez-Alcazar, Takako Sasaki, Andrew J. Copp and Patricia Ybot-Gonzalez

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23846

      Key findings

      • Laminin α5, β3, and γ2 chains are co-expressed by cells of the ventral ectodermal ridge (VER) in the E9.5 mouse embryo.

      • A possible new laminin532 variant is expressed by VER cells.

      • Laminin 532 may interact with α6-containing integrins to mediate BMP signalling during development of the mouse tail bud.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Molecular profiling of synovial joints: Use of microarray analysis to identify factors that direct the development of the knee and elbow (pages 1816–1826)

      Dorothy E. Pazin, Laura W. Gamer, Karen A. Cox and Vicki Rosen

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23861

      Key findings:

      • How individual joints acquire unique shapes and specialized structures is unknown.

      • There are fundamental difference in the way joints develop after interzone formation.

      • We use comparative gene expression to identify knee and elbow genes.

      • TGFβ regulates knee development.

      • Muscle development regulates elbow morphogenesis.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Characterization of TALE genes expression during the first lineage segregation in mammalian embryos (pages 1827–1839)

      Wendy Sonnet, Rene Rezsöhazy and Isabelle Donnay

      Version of Record online: 10 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23873

      Key findings:

      • By a systematic approach, we demonstrated the transcription and translation of TALE genes before gastrulation during the first steps of cell differentiation in bovine and in mouse embryos.

      • TALE genes are expressed during the first cell lineage specification in mammals.

      • TALE proteins are present before gastrulation in mammalian morulae and blastocysts.

      • TALE genes expression is differently regulated in mouse and bovine early embryos.

      • TALE mRNA and protein levels are well correlated in early mammalian embryos.

      • TALE proteins are found both in the inner cell mass and trophectoderm cells of mammalian blastocysts.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION