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Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 241 Issue 12

Special Issue: Special Focus on Developmental Biology in Latin America

December 2012

Volume 241, Issue 12

Pages C1–C1, 1841–2013

  1. Cover Image

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Editorials
    6. Special Issue Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    7. Special Issue Research Articles
    8. Research Articles
    9. Techniques
    10. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Developmental expression of Drosophila Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome family proteins (page C1)

      Evelyn Rodriguez-Mesa, Maria Teresa Abreu-Blanco, Alicia E. Rosales-Nieves and Susan M. Parkhurst

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23899

      Key findings:

      • Developmental expression patterns of four Drosophila WASP family proteins provided

      • Developmental expression patterns of WASP family proteins throughout oogenesis

      • Developmental expression patterns of WASP family proteins throughout embryogenesis

      • WASP family members exhibit both overlapping and discrete expression patterns

      • WASP family expression reflects known functions and reveals potential new functions

  2. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Editorials
    6. Special Issue Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    7. Special Issue Research Articles
    8. Research Articles
    9. Techniques
    10. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      Highlights in DD

      Julie C. Kiefer

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23885

  3. ArtPix

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Editorials
    6. Special Issue Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    7. Special Issue Research Articles
    8. Research Articles
    9. Techniques
    10. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      DD ArtPix

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23900

  4. Editorials

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Editorials
    6. Special Issue Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    7. Special Issue Research Articles
    8. Research Articles
    9. Techniques
    10. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      A Transition (page 1841)

      Gary C. Schoenwolf

      Article first published online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23849

  5. Special Issue Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Editorials
    6. Special Issue Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    7. Special Issue Research Articles
    8. Research Articles
    9. Techniques
    10. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      Robustness of the hypoxic response: Another job for miRNAs? (pages 1842–1848)

      Ana Laura De Lella Ezcurra, Agustina P. Bertolin, Mariana Melani and Pablo Wappner

      Article first published online: 28 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23865

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Epigenetic landscape and miRNA involvement during neural crest development (pages 1849–1856)

      Pablo H. Strobl-Mazzulla, Melisa Marini and Ailín Buzzi

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23868

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      Hormone symphony during root growth and development (pages 1867–1885)

      Adriana Garay-Arroyo, María De La Paz Sánchez, Berenice García-Ponce, Eugenio Azpeitia and Elena R. Álvarez-Buylla

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23878

  6. Special Issue Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Editorials
    6. Special Issue Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    7. Special Issue Research Articles
    8. Research Articles
    9. Techniques
    10. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      RGMa and RGMb expression pattern during chicken development suggest unexpected roles for these repulsive guidance molecules in notochord formation, somitogenesis, and myogenesis (pages 1886–1900)

      Erika Cristina Jorge, Mohi U. Ahmed, Ingo Bothe, Luiz Lehmman Coutinho and Susanne Dietrich

      Article first published online: 6 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23889

      Key findings:

      • RGMa and RGMb expression patterns in neural tissues are conserved in gnathostome vertebrates.

      • RGMa might be associated with muscle stem cells capable of undertaking myogenesis, and RGMb with cells ready to enter myogenic differentiation.

      • RGMa and RGMb may promote myogenesis by modulating bone morphogenetic signaling and Shh signal transduction.

      • RGM family members may act in maintaining notochord integrity and longitudinal axis formation.

  7. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Editorials
    6. Special Issue Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    7. Special Issue Research Articles
    8. Research Articles
    9. Techniques
    10. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Ephrin-B stimulation of calvarial bone formation (pages 1901–1910)

      M. Douglas Benson, Lynne A. Opperman, Jan Westerlund, Claudia R. Fernandez, Symone San Miguel, Mark Henkemeyer and George Chenaux

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23874

      Key Findings:

      • Ephrin-B2 is highly expressed at sites of active osteogenesis in developing mouse calvaria.

      • Ephrin-B2 dramatically increases bone growth in embryonic calvaria and osteoblast differentiation in MC3T3-E1 cells independent of type 1 collagen matrix secretion.

      • EphB1 and EphB2 are expressed at osteogenic sites, consistent with roles as candidate ephrin-B receptors. EphB4, previously thought to be the major ephrin-B2 receptor in osteoblasts, is virtually absent in developing and adult skulls.

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      Functional redundancy between Cdc14 phosphatases in zebrafish ciliogenesis (pages 1911–1921)

      Aurélie Clément, Lilianna Solnica-Krezel and Kathleen L. Gould

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23876

      Key findings:

      • Cdc14A1 is present at the base of the cilium.

      • Ciliogenesis in the Kupffer's vesicle is affected in cdc14a1-depleted embryos.

      • Cdc14A1 and Cdc14B phosphatases are functionally redundant in the process of ciliogenesis.

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      Structural disorganization of pronephric glomerulus in Zebrafish mpp5a/nagie oko mutant (pages 1922–1932)

      Koichiro Ichimura, Yayoi Fukuyo, Tomomi Nakamura, Rebecca Powell, Tatsuo Sakai and Tomoko Obara

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23877

      Key Findings:

      • Mpp5a is localized at the podocyte foot process in the zebrafish pronephric glomerulus.

      • Zebrafish mpp5am520 mutants display structural disorganization of the pronephric glomerulus including glomerular capillary agenesis, but regular foot processes with slit diaphragm were formed.

      • Mpp5a is not prerequisite to form podocyte slit diaphragm in the pronephric glomerular development in zebrafish.

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      Interactions between Drosophila IgCAM adhesion receptors and cindr, the Cd2ap/Cin85 ortholog (pages 1933–1943)

      Ruth I. Johnson, Sujin Bao and Ross L. Cagan

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23879

      Key Findings:

      • In the Drosophila eye, distribution of the IgCAMs Rst and Hbs is regulated by the adaptor protein Cindr.

      • Cindr functions in two converse processes, targeting Rst and Hbs for endocytic regulation and stabilizing Rst-Hbs complexes at cell junctions.

      • Hence, Cindr recapitulates both proposed functions of its mammalian orthologs Cd2ap and Cin85.

      • Regulation of Cindr is a key step for facilitating tissue plasticity during morphogenesis and maintaining functional structures in mature tissues.

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      The Skeletal site-specific role of connective tissue growth factor in prenatal osteogenesis (pages 1944–1959)

      Alex G. Lambi, Talia L. Pankratz, Christina Mundy, Maureen Gannon, Mary F. Barbe, Joan T. Richtsmeier and Steven N. Popoff

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23888

      Key findings:

      • Newborn CTGF knockout mice have skeletal site-specific changes in bone formation.

      • Growth plate abnormalities in CTGF KO mice include decreased proliferative zone length and increased hypertrophic zone length.

      • Global and regional differences in CTGF KO skull shape result from allometric (size-based) and nonallometric shape changes.

      • In vivo gene expression from CTGF KO skeletal sites demonstrates contrasting expression patterns; while tibial midshaft shows increased expression of bone formation markers (Runx-2, ALP, OC) and CCN3, parietal bone has decreased expression of bone formation markers and CCN1.

      • Dysregulation of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) ligand/receptor gene expression, coupled with unique morphologic aberrations in CTGF KO skulls, points to the TGF-β-CTGF axis as a potential mechanistic explanation for the craniofacial phenotype seen in CTGF KO mice.

  8. Techniques

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Editorials
    6. Special Issue Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    7. Special Issue Research Articles
    8. Research Articles
    9. Techniques
    10. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Cell type–specific translational profiling in the Xenopus laevis retina (pages 1960–1972)

      F. L. Watson, E. A. Mills, X. Wang, C. Guo, D. F. Chen and N. Marsh-Armstrong

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23880

      Key Findings:

      • Xenopus laevis transgenic lines drive TRAP transgenes specifically in retinal ganglion cells and rod photoreceptor cells.

      • TRAP selectively purifies mRNAs from targeted cells.

      • Statistical tests demonstrate high efficiency of TRAP in the Xenopus laevis retina.

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      In vivo evidence for unbiased ikaros retinal lineages using an ikaros-cre mouse line driving clonal recombination (pages 1973–1985)

      Basile Tarchini, Christine Jolicoeur and Michel Cayouette

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23881

      Key Findings

      • The Ikaros retinal lineage gives rise to both early- and late-born cell types and is confirmed unbiased in vivo

      • One Ikaros-Cre mouse line allows sparse recombination in retinal progenitors and is validated as a tool for in vivo lineage tracing

      • A distinct Ikaros-Cre mouse line allows sparse recombination specifically in some postmitotic early-born retinal cell types

  9. Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Image
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Editorials
    6. Special Issue Reviews–A Peer Reviewed Forum
    7. Special Issue Research Articles
    8. Research Articles
    9. Techniques
    10. Patterns & Phenotypes
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      Phenotype of entero-endocrine L cells becomes restricted during development (pages 1986–1992)

      Marine Grigoryan, Mamdouh H. Kedees, Yelena Guz and Gladys Teitelman

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23875

      Key Findings:

      • The intestine of mouse embryos contains a high number of LK cells, an entero-endocrine cell type that produces the incretins GIP and GLP-1.

      • In contrast to adults, L cells of embryos coexpress glucagon and GLP-1, two hormones that are derived from the glucagon gene by posttranslational processing of the precursor protein proglucagon.

      • Mouse embryonic L cells do not proliferate.

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      Analysis of postembryonic heart development and maturation in the zebrafish, Danio rerio (pages 1993–2004)

      Corinna Singleman and Nathalia G. Holtzman

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23882

      Key findings:

      • A third cardiac rotation, occurring at standard length 3.4 mm (104 hr postfertilization) places the heart in its final orientation.

      • Cardiac maturation significantly modifies cardiac form during larval stages but continues throughout the juvenile stages to adulthood.

      • Ventricle size directly correlates with fish length.

      • Two dominant cardiac trabeculations regulate cardiac form and function.

      • Partial loss of atrial contraction seen in myh6/weahu423/+ results in maintenance of larval cardiac form throughout adulthood.

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      Distinct expression patterns of Sulf1 and Hs6st1 spatially regulate heparan sulfate sulfation during prostate development (pages 2005–2013)

      Rita A. Buresh-Stiemke, Rita L. Malinowski, Kimberly P. Keil, Chad M. Vezina, Arie Oosterhof, Toin H. Van Kuppevelt and Paul C. Marker

      Article first published online: 5 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23886

      Key findings:

      • Heparan sulfate sulfation modifying enzymes Sulf1 and Hs6st1 have distinct but overlapping expression domains in the developing prostate.

      • BMP4 and BMP7 induced Sulf1 expression in the developing prostate and decreased epithelial HS 6-O sulfation.

      • BMP4 and BMP7 reduced ERK1/2 activation in response to FGF10.

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