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Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 241 Issue 2

February 2012

Volume 241, Issue 2

Pages i–i, 229–433

  1. Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Special Issue Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    9. Shop Talk
    10. Errata
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      Induction of canonical Wnt signaling by alsterpaullone is sufficient for oral tissue fate during regeneration and embryogenesis in Nematostella vectensis (page i)

      Michael Trevino, Derek J. Stefanik, Richard Rodriguez, Shane Harmon and Patrick M. Burton

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23732

  2. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Special Issue Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    9. Shop Talk
    10. Errata
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      Highlights in DD

      Julie C. Kiefer

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23704

  3. ArtPix

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Special Issue Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    9. Shop Talk
    10. Errata
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      DD ArtPix

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23733

  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Special Issue Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    9. Shop Talk
    10. Errata
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      Differential contribution of Neurog1 and Neurog2 on the formation of cranial ganglia along the anterior-posterior axis (pages 229–241)

      Masumi Takano-Maruyama, Yiju Chen and Gary O. Gaufo

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.22785

      Key findings:

      • Specification of epibranchial placode-derived nodose ganglion requires both Neurog1 and Neurog2.

      • Specification of neural crest-derived parasympathetic otic ganglion requires both Neurog1 and Neurog2.

      • Loss of Neurog genes associated with the complementary loss of visceral sensory (nodose) and parasympathetic (otic) ganglia due to apoptosis.

      • Neurog1 and Neurog2 are transiently expressed in the neural crest fated for the parasympathetic otic ganglion lineage.

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      Increased β-catenin activity in the anterior neural plate induces ectopic mid-hindbrain characteristics (pages 242–246)

      Hunki Paek, Michelle W. Antoine, Frank Diaz and Jean M. Hébert

      Article first published online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.22787

      Key findings:

      • Elevating the level of active β-catenin in the anterior neural plate leads to a loss of the telencephalon.

      • Instead, high levels of β-catenin in the anterior neural plate leads to mid-hindbrain characteristics.

      • β-catenin levels may regulate a telencephalic versus mid-hindbrain fate by regulating levels of FGF signaling.

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      Signaling by SHH rescues facial defects following blockade in the brain (pages 247–256)

      H. Jonathan Chong, Nathan M. Young, Diane Hu, Juhee Jeong, Andrew P. McMahon, Benedikt Hallgrimsson and Ralph S. Marcucio

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23726

      Key findings:

      • SHH can rescue facial malformations after blocking SHH signaling in the brain.

      • Induction of Shh expression in the FEZ requires SHH signaling from the brain.

      • 3D geometric morphometrics can be used to quantify malformation and rescue.

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      ΔNp63 is regulated by BMP4 signaling and is required for early epidermal development in Xenopus (pages 257–269)

      Celeste Tríbulo, María Guadalupe Barrionuevo, Tristán H. Agüero, Sara S. Sánchez, Nora B. Calcaterra and Manuel J. Aybar

      Article first published online: 14 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23706

      Key findings:

      • ΔNp63 expression is regulated by BMP signaling.

      • Gain- and loss-of-function experiments show that ΔNp63 is essential since the earliest steps of epidermis induction for the proper development of this tissue.

      • ΔNp63 participates in epidermal development regulating the expression of some components of the apoptotic pathway.

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      Mouse primitive streak forms in situ by initiation of epithelial to mesenchymal transition without migration of a cell population (pages 270–283)

      Margot Williams, Carol Burdsal, Ammasi Periasamy, Mark Lewandoski and Ann Sutherland

      Article first published online: 14 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23711

      Key findings:

      • The posterior epiblast of the murine embryo does not display convergence and extension behavior, coordinated cell migration, or large-scale cell rearrangements prior to or during primitive streak formation.

      • The murine primitive streak develops in situ by initiation of epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in the posterior-most epiblast, and elongates by anterior progression of this EMT.

      • Loss of basal lamina (BL) precedes other steps of EMT at the primitive streak, and is tightly correlated with the ingression of nascent mesoderm.

      • Cells leave the epiblast and enter the primitive streak by apical constriction and somal translocation.

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      Myocardial progenitors in the pharyngeal regions migrate to distinct conotruncal regions (pages 284–293)

      Makiko Takahashi, Yumi Terasako, Nariaki Yanagawa, Masatake Kai, Toshiyuki Yamagishi and Yuji Nakajima

      Article first published online: 19 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23714

      Key findings:

      • Myocardial progenitors from the secondary heart field (SHF) and anterior heart field (AHF) contribute to distinct conotruncal regions.

      • Progenitor cells from the right and left SHF migrate rotationally to form left dorsal wall of the OFT and right ventral wall of the OFT, respectively.

      • Progenitors from the AHF migrate non-rotationally and contribute to ventral wall of the OFT.

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      Hyaluronan is required for cranial neural crest cells migration and craniofacial development (pages 294–302)

      Paola Casini, Irma Nardi and Michela Ori

      Article first published online: 19 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23715

      Key findings:

      • Cranial NCC migrate throughout a hyaluronan rich extracellular matrix

      • Hyaluronan synthases 1 and 2 activity is necessary to maintain the migratory behaviour of cranial NCC

      • After NCC migration, the presence of Hyaluronan in the extracellular matrix is necessary for the survival of pre-chondrogenic cranial NCC.

      • CD44, a Hyaluronan receptor, is required for cranial NCC migration but not for their survival.

      • In Xenopus, the craniofacial skeleton formation is deeply influenced by the composition of the extracellular matrix during cranial NCC migration and differentiation.

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      Fibulin-1 is required during cardiac ventricular morphogenesis for versican cleavage, suppression of ErbB2 and Erk1/2 activation, and to attenuate trabecular cardiomyocyte proliferation (pages 303–314)

      Marion A. Cooley, Victor M. Fresco, Margaret E. Dorlon, Waleed O. Twal, Nathan V. Lee, Jeremy L. Barth, Christine B. Kern, M. Luisa Iruela-Arispe and W. Scott Argraves

      Article first published online: 19 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23716

      Key findings:

      • Fibulin-1 promotes ADAMTS1-mediated cleavage of versican.

      • Fibulin-1 deficient embryonic cardiac ventricles have reduced levels of the 70-kDa amino-terminal fragment of versican V1 containing a carboxy terminal DPEAAE sequence.

      • Fibulin-1 deficient embryonic cardiac ventricles have increased trabecular cardiomyocyte proliferation.

      • Fibulin-1 deficient embryonic cardiac ventricles have increased levels of ErbB2 and Erk1/2 activation.

      • Hearts from versicanhdf/hdf embryos lack versican V0/V1 and show a lack of trabeculae.

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      olig2-expressing hindbrain cells are required for migrating facial motor neurons (pages 315–326)

      Denise A. Zannino, Charles G. Sagerström and Bruce Appel

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23718

      Key findings:

      • Hindbrain cells along the pathway of migrating facial motor neurons express olig2.

      • Loss of olig2 function disrupts facial motor neuron migration through the hindbrain.

      • olig2-expressing hindbrain cells might be intermediate targets from migrating facial motor neurons.

  5. Techniques

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Special Issue Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    9. Shop Talk
    10. Errata
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      An mnr2b/hlxb9lb enhancer trap line that labels spinal and abducens motor neurons in zebrafish (pages 327–332)

      Kazuhide Asakawa, Shin-ichi Higashijima and Koichi Kawakami

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.22781

      Key findings:

      • The mnr2b/hlxb9lb enhancer trap line marks spinal and abducens motor neurons during embryonic and larval stages.

      • A Gal4FF transgenic line that labels the extraocular muscles, including the lateral rectus muscle, was established.

      • By combining these transgenic constructs, the innervation of the lateral rectus by the abducens motor neurons can be visualized in intact animals.

  6. Special Issue Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Special Issue Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    9. Shop Talk
    10. Errata
    1. You have free access to this content
      Expression of the rubber-like protein, resilin, in developing and functional insect cuticle determined using a Drosophila anti-rec 1 resilin antibody (pages 333–339)

      Darren C. C. Wong, Roger D. Pearson, Christopher M. Elvin and David J. Merritt

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23724

      Key findings:

      • Insect resilins are rubber-like proteins laid down in cuticle that confer extreme flexibility and energy storage.

      • An antibody to the Drosophila Rec-1 resilin is used to explore the expression of resilin in Drosophila and other species.

      • In Drosophila embryos, expression is seen in the epidermis in repeated segmental patterns.

      • In Drosophila adults, expression is seen at the wing bases and the bases of sense organs.

      • The antibody cross-reacts, binding to well-characterised resilin sites in the dragonfly and flea.

  7. Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Special Issue Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    9. Shop Talk
    10. Errata
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      MCS9.7 enhancer activity is highly, but not completely, associated with expression of Irf6 and p63 (pages 340–349)

      Walid D. Fakhouri, Lindsey Rhea, Tianli Du, Eileen Sweezer, Harris Morrison, David Fitzpatrick, Baoli Yang, Martine Dunnwald and Brian C. Schutte

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.22786

      Key findings:

      • MCS9.7 activity is highly associated with endogenous expression of IRF6 in most embryonic murine tissues.

      • MCS9.7 is not sufficient to recapitulate the expression of IRF6 in the medial edge epithelium at E14.5.

      • MCS9.7 activity and IRF6 expression are highly colocalized in periderm where p63 is absent in orofacial epithelium.

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      Extracellular matrix remodeling accompanies axial muscle development and morphogenesis in the mouse (pages 350–364)

      Marianne Deries, André B. Gonçalves, Raquel Vaz, Gabriel G. Martins, Gabriela Rodrigues and Sólveig Thorsteinsdóttir

      Article first published online: 29 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23703

      Key findings:

      • Four stages of dermomyotome/myotome development are defined.

      • The interstitial matrix around thde dermomyotome and myotome is rich in fibronectin.

      • Fibronectin and tenascin are enriched at intersegmental borders and penetrate into the myotome.

      • Laminin matrices line the dermomyotome and myotome.

      • These laminin matrices are disassembled as the dermomyotome dissociates and the myotome transforms into the epaxial muscle masses.

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      Dynamic expression of Tbx2 subfamily genes in development of the mouse reproductive system (pages 365–375)

      Nataki C. Douglas, Kathleen Heng, Mark V. Sauer and Virginia E. Papaioannou

      Article first published online: 16 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23710

      Key findings:

      • This is the first study to characterize the expression of multiple T-box genes, the four closely related members of the Tbx2 subfamily, in both the internal and external reproductive systems of males and females.

      • We show that Tbx2 and Tbx3 have both unique and overlapping expression domains in the internal reproductive system during initial stages of gonad and genital duct formation, after establishment of sexual dimorphism and at postnatal, pre-pubertal stages.

      • β-Tbx4 is expressed in embryonic male and female germ cells and postnatal oocytes.

      • All four Tbx2 subfamily genes, Tbx2, Tbx3, Tbx4, and Tbx5, are expressed in mesenchyme in external genitalia, with Tbx3 and Tbx5 expression in the epithelium as well.

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      Notch pathway regulation of neural crest cell development in vivo (pages 376–389)

      Timothy J. Mead and Katherine E. Yutzey

      Article first published online: 3 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23717

      Key findings:

      • Altered Notch signaling in neural crest cells results in neurocristopathies.

      • Manipulation of Notch signaling results in defective neural crest cell migration.

      • Notch signaling promotes neural crest cell proliferation.

      • Notch signaling regulates pharyngeal arch artery smooth muscle differentiation.

      • Notch signaling promotes gliogenesis while inhibiting neurogenesis.

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      The dynamic nitric oxide pattern in developing cuttlefish Sepia officinalis (pages 390–402)

      Teresa Mattiello, Maria Costantini, Bruna Di Matteo, Sonia Livigni, Aude Andouche, Laure Bonnaud and Anna Palumbo

      Article first published online: 3 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23722

      Key findings:

      • NO is endogenously synthesized in all developmental stages of the cuttlefish Sepia officinalis.

      • The spatial pattern of NO and NOS is very dynamic and concerns both superficial and internal structures.

      • NO could be involved in important functional processes providing new insights in this emerging model for developmental studies.

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      Thyroid hormone-induced sonic hedgehog signal up-regulates its own pathway in a paracrine manner in the Xenopus laevis intestine during metamorphosis (pages 403–414)

      Takashi Hasebe, Mitsuko Kajita, Liezhen Fu, Yun-Bo Shi and Atsuko Ishizuya-Oka

      Article first published online: 20 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23723

      Key findings:

      • Ptc-1, Smo, Gli1, Gli2 and Gli3 are up-regulated in the mesenchymal tissues of the Xenopus laevis intestine during natural and TH-induced metamorphosis.

      • Gli2 is a direct TH response gene.

      • The expression of Ptc-1, Smo, Gli1, Gli2 and Gli3 are also regulated by Shh itself.

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      Tol2 gene trap integrations in the zebrafish amyloid precursor protein genes appa and aplp2 reveal accumulation of secreted APP at the embryonic veins (pages 415–425)

      Hsin-Kai Liao, Ying Wang, Kristin E. Noack Watt, Qin Wen, Justin Breitbach, Chelsy K. Kemmet, Karl J. Clark, Stephen C. Ekker, Jeffrey J. Essner and Maura McGrail

      Article first published online: 24 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23725

      Key findings:

      • Isolation of appa and aplp2 Tol2 gene trap alleles; appa and aplp2 expression in neuronal tissues during embryogenesis.

      • Secretion of predicted appa-RFP and aplp2-RFP fusion proteins.

      • Accumulation of appa-RFP and aplp2-RFP in living embryos at veinous vasculature.

  8. Shop Talk

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Special Issue Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    9. Shop Talk
    10. Errata
    1. You have free access to this content
  9. Errata

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Special Issue Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    9. Shop Talk
    10. Errata
    1. You have free access to this content
      Erratum: Deficiency in crumbs homolog 2 (Crb2) affects gastrulation and results in embryonic lethality in mice (page 431)

      Zhijie Xiao, Jaakko Patrakka, Masatoshi Nukui, Lijun Chi, Dadi Niu, Christer Betsholtz, Timo Pikkarainen, Seppo Vainio and Karl Tryggvason

      Article first published online: 16 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23719

      This article corrects:

      Deficiency in crumbs homolog 2 (Crb2) affects gastrulation and results in embryonic lethality in mice

      Vol. 240, Issue 12, 2646–2656, Article first published online: 9 NOV 2011

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    3. You have free access to this content
      Erratum: Twist1 dimer selection regulates cranial suture patterning and fusion (page 433)

      Jeannette Connerney, Viktoria Andreeva, Yael Leshem, Christian Muentener, Miguel A. Mercado and Douglas B. Spicer

      Article first published online: 16 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23721

      This article corrects:

      Twist1 dimer selection regulates cranial suture patterning and fusion

      Vol. 235, Issue 5, 1334–1346, Article first published online: 24 FEB 2006

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