You have free access to this content

Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 241 Issue 3

March 2012

Volume 241, Issue 3

Pages i–i, 435–637

  1. Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Special Issue Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      MCS9.7 Enhancer activity is highly, but not completely, associated with expression of Irf6 and p63 (page i)

      Walid D. Fakhouri, Lindsey Rhea, Tianli Du, Eileen Sweezer, Harris Morrison, David Fitzpatrick, Baoli Yang, Martine Dunnwald and Brian C. Schutte

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23751

  2. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Special Issue Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Highlights in DD

      Julie C. Kiefer

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23741

  3. ArtPix

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Special Issue Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      DD ArtPix

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23752

  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Special Issue Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Bone pattern formation in mouse limbs after amputation at the forearm level (pages 435–441)

      Hiroyuki Ide

      Article first published online: 23 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23728

      Key findings:

      • BMP induced bone pattern formation in mouse limbs.

      • Cartilage formation was observed before the bone formation.

      • Mesenchymal tissues of the limbs other than dermis, bone and joint cartilage were responsive to BMP-7.

    2. You have free access to this content
      Zebrafish cadherin-11 participates in retinal differentiation and retinotectal axon projection during visual system development (pages 442–454)

      Sherry G. Clendenon, Swapnalee Sarmah, Bijal Shah, Qin Liu and James A. Marrs

      Article first published online: 13 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23729

      Key findings:

      • Cdh11 controls retina development during visual system development.

      • Cdh11 controls retinotectal axon projections during visual system development.

      • Differential cadherin adhesion has a complex regulatory role during visual system development.

    3. You have free access to this content
      The biological function of the WD40 repeat-containing protein p55/Caf1 in Drosophila (pages 455–464)

      Pei Wen, Zhenghui Quan and Rongwen Xi

      Article first published online: 12 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23730

      Key findings:

      • p55 is generally required for cell proliferation and survival in Drosophila.

      • Histone H3K27 di-/tri-methylation and PRC2-mediated gene silencing occurs normally in the absence of p55.

      • The binding-pocket-mutant p55 can substitute the wild-type p55 for animal survival.

    4. You have free access to this content
      Scanning thin-sheet laser imaging microscopy elucidates details on mouse ear development (pages 465–480)

      Benjamin Kopecky, Shane Johnson, Heather Schmitz, Peter Santi and Bernd Fritzsch

      Article first published online: 23 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23736

      Key findings:

      • Three-dimensional reconstructions from high resolution optical sections using sTSLIM allow a unique perspective into both morphogenesis as well as neurosensory development of the ear.

      • The inner ear undergoes major morphogenesis between E11.5 and E15.5.

      • After the formation of all six sensory epithelia, the inner ear endolymphatic volume increases rapidly until P0.

      • From E15.5 to P0, not only does the ear grow extensively, complete neurosensory formation is completed.

      • Minimal changes occur after P0 and by P15 the ear is mature.

      Corrected by:

      Erratum: Scanning thin-sheet laser imaging microscopy elucidates details on mouse ear development

      Vol. 242, Issue 5, 591–592, Article first published online: 27 MAR 2013

    5. You have free access to this content
      Distinct Caenorhabditis elegans HLH-8/twist-containing dimers function in the mesoderm (pages 481–492)

      Mary C. Philogene, Stephany G. Meyers Small, Peng Wang and Ann K. Corsi

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23734

      Key findings:

      • HLH-8/HLH-8 dimers function in M lineage.

      • HLH-2/HLH-8 dimers function in vulval muscles.

      • HLH-8 dimer switch coincides with differentiation.

    6. You have free access to this content
      Requirements for Jag1-Rbpj mediated Notch signaling during early mouse lens development (pages 493–504)

      Tien T. Le, Kevin W. Conley, Timothy J. Mead, Sheldon Rowan, Katherine E. Yutzey and Nadean L. Brown

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23739

      Key findings:

      • In the mouse, Notch signaling has no apparent role in lens induction.

      • Jag1 and Rbpj regulate lens vesicle separation.

    7. You have free access to this content
      TEG-1 CD2BP2 regulates stem cell proliferation and sex determination in the C. elegans germ line and physically interacts with the UAF-1 U2AF65 splicing factor (pages 505–521)

      Chris Wang, Laura Wilson-Berry, Tim Schedl and Dave Hansen

      Article first published online: 30 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23735

      Key findings:

      • TEG-1 inhibits stem cell proliferation in the C. elegans germ line.

      • TEG-1 likely functions as a splicing factor.

      • TEG-1 CDBP2 physically interacts with UAF-1 U2AF65.

    8. You have free access to this content
      3-dimensional morphometric analysis of murine bladder development and dysmorphogenesis (pages 522–533)

      Ashley Carpenter, Andrew Paulus, Melissa Robinson, Carlton M. Bates, Michael L. Robinson, David Hains, David Kline and Kirk M. McHugh

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23744

      Key findings:

      • Detrusor smooth muscle differentiation initiated in the bladder dome and progressed caudally with the leading edge extending down the right posterior surface of the bladder

      • Gender-specific differences in detrusor smooth muscle development were observed during early embryonic development

      • Bladder trigone morphology transitioned from an isosceles to equilateral triangle during development due to the preferential lengthening of the urethra to ureter distance.

      • The primary defect observed in mgb–/– bladders was a significant reduction in detrusor smooth muscle differentiation throughout development.

      • Deviations from normal trigone morphology correlated best with VUR development in Fgfr2Mes–/– mice, while alterations in intravesicular tunnel length did not.

  5. Techniques

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Special Issue Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Optical coherence tomography captures rapid hemodynamic responses to acute hypoxia in the cardiovascular system of early embryos (pages 534–544)

      Shi Gu, Michael W. Jenkins, Lindsy M. Peterson, Yong-Qiu Doughman, Andrew M. Rollins and Michiko Watanabe

      Article first published online: 23 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23727

      Key findings:

      • Doppler OCT captures embryo hemodynamics.

      • Rapid and sensitive screening for functional phenotypes.

      • Heart function reflected in vitelline artery function.

      • Hypoxia causes rapid hemodynamic changes.

    2. You have free access to this content
      A simple technique for early in vivo electroporation of E1 chick embryos (pages 545–552)

      Charmaine Y. Brown, Dae Seok Eom, Smita Amarnath and Seema Agarwala

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23747

      Key findings:

      • In vivo gene manipulations in E1 chick embryos are technically challenging and currently not feasible

      • Most studies therefore employ in vitro electroporations of cultured embryos at E1

      • We describe a novel technique for in vivo electroporations of E1 chick embryos as young as Hamburger-Hamilton stage 4

      • ur technique permits the in vivo examination of early morphogenetic events (e.g., neural tube closure) that occur at E1 and where proper three-dimensional tissue morphology is critical

  6. Special Issue Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Special Issue Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Drosophila lilliputian is required for proneural gene expression in retinal development (pages 553–562)

      Ginnene M. Distefano, Andrew J. Gangemi, Preeti J. Khandelwal, Aleister J. Saunders and Daniel R. Marenda

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23738

      Key findings:

      • Lilliputian regulates ato expression.

      • Lilliputian regulates da expression.

      • FMR2 regulates TCF12 and MATH5.

  7. Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Special Issue Patterns & Phenotypes
    8. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have free access to this content
      Identification of putative retinoic acid target genes downstream of mesenchymal Tbx1 during inner ear development (pages 563–573)

      Dennis C. Monks and Bernice E. Morrow

      Article first published online: 1 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23731

      Key findings:

      • Ablation of mesodermal Tbx1 alters expression of RA target genes' need for inner development

      • Clusterin homozygous null mutants do not have obvious inner ear development

    2. You have free access to this content
      Astacin-like metallo-endopeptidase is dynamically expressed in embryonic stem cells and embryonic epithelium during morphogenesis (pages 574–582)

      Hervé Acloque, Fabrice Lavial and Bertrand Pain

      Article first published online: 25 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23737

      Key findings:

      • ASTL is expressed in pluripotent embryonic stem cells but is not sufficient to maintain pluripotency.

      • ASTL is downregulated in the prospective neural plate, at least partially by the FGF pathway.

      • ASTL is strongly expressed in time and place of neural tube closure.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Dynamic distribution of claudin proteins in pancreatic epithelia undergoing morphogenesis or neoplastic transformation (pages 583–594)

      Joby J. Westmoreland, Yiannis Drosos, Jacqueline Kelly, Jianming Ye, Anna L. Means, M. Kay Washington and Beatriz Sosa-Pineda

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23740

      Key findings:

      • Claudin proteins have a dynamic subcellular distribution in the developing pancreatic epithelium

      • Within the postnatal pancreas, subtypes of epithelial cells express a specific complement of claudin proteins

      • The subcellular localization of claudin proteins is altered during neoplastic transformation in the pancreas

      • Cldn18 is not expressed at any stage of pancreas development but is highly expressed in the transformed pancreatic epithelium

    4. You have free access to this content
      VEGF 165b in the developing vasculatures of the fetal human eye (pages 595–607)

      Takayuki Baba, D. Scott McLeod, Malia M. Edwards, Carol Merges, Tanusree Sen, Debasish Sinha and Gerard A. Lutty

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23743

      Key findings:

      • The localization of VEGF165b was distinctly different from VEGF165 both spatially and temporally.

      • In the fetal vasculature of vitreous and the choriocapillaris, VEGF165 was very prominent as the vessels developed, while VEGF165b was not remarkable until vascular development neared completion.

      • VEGF165b was often associated with nucleus of progenitors, including retinal angioblasts.

      • VEGF165b was prominent in the nucleus of both endothelial cells and pericytes in the fetal vasculature of vitreous and the choroidal vasculature

      • The same cell can have VEGF165 present in basal cytoplasm as well as VEGF165b present in nucleus

    5. You have free access to this content
      Developmental expression of Drosophila Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome family proteins (pages 608–626)

      Evelyn Rodriguez-Mesa, Maria Teresa Abreu-Blanco, Alicia E. Rosales-Nieves and Susan M. Parkhurst

      Article first published online: 31 JAN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23742

      Key findings:

      • Developmental expression patterns of four Drosophila WASP family proteins provided

      • Developmental expression patterns of WASP family proteins throughout oogenesis

      • Developmental expression patterns of WASP family proteins throughout embryogenesis

      • WASP family members exhibit both overlapping and discrete expression patterns

      • WASP family expression reflects known functions and reveals potential new functions

    6. You have free access to this content
      Neogenin regulates sonic hedgehog pathway activity during digit patterning (pages 627–637)

      Mingi Hong, Karen A. Schachter, Guoying Jiang and Robert S. Krauss

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23745

      Key findings:

      • Neo1 mutant mice have preaxial polydactyly with low penetrance.

      • Neo1 interacts genetically with Gli3 in a complex manner.

      • Neogenin regulates SHH signaling in vivo and in vitro.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION