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Developmental Dynamics

Cover image for Vol. 241 Issue 4

April 2012

Volume 241, Issue 4

Pages C1–C1, 639–829

  1. Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Cell–cell adhesion defects in Mrj mutant trophoblast cells are associated with failure to pattern the chorion during early placental development (page C1)

      Erica D. Watson, Martha Hughes, David G. Simmons, David R.C. Natale, Ann E. Sutherland and James C. Cross

      Article first published online: 12 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23765

  2. Highlights

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Highlights in DD

      Julie C. Kiefer

      Article first published online: 12 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23757

  3. ArtPix

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      DD ArtPix

      Article first published online: 12 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23766

  4. Research Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Dynamic regulation of sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ stores by stromal interaction molecule 1 and sarcolipin during muscle differentiation (pages 639–647)

      Malini Seth, Tianyu Li, Victoria Graham, Jarrett Burch, Elizabeth Finch, Jonathan A. Stiber and Paul B. Rosenberg

      Article first published online: 12 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23760

      Key findings:

      • Differentiating myotubes lacking functional STIM1 exhibit diminished calcium store content and upregulation of sarcolipin (SLN), an inhibitor of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) calcium pump.

      • Sarcolipin overexpression in myotubes reduced store-operated calcium entry, reduced SR Ca2+ content, and delayed muscle differentiation.

      • STIM1 is reduced in sarcolipin overexpressing myotubes, and reintroduction of STIM1 into sarcolipin overexpressing myotubes can rescue the defect in store-operated calcium entry.

      • During mouse muscle development SLN is highly expressed in embryonic muscle, while the expression of STIM1 is upregulated postnatally.

      • These results suggest that store-operated calcium entry in skeletal muscle regulates SR/ER specialization in a specific temporal pattern and that sarcolipin and STIM1 act in opposing fashions to govern store-operated calcium entry during myogenesis.

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      Voltage-gated calcium channel CACNB2 (β2.1) protein is required in the heart for control of cell proliferation and heart tube integrity (pages 648–662)

      Yelena Chernyavskaya, Alicia M. Ebert, Emily Milligan and Deborah M. Garrity

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23746

      Key findings:

      • The CACNB2 gene is required during embryogenesis for normal ventricular cardiomyocyte proliferation, cardiac looping, chamber morphogenesis and cardiac contractility.

      • Reduction of CACNB2 reduced the integrity of embryonic heart tubes, rendering them vulnerable to rupture upon stress, and depleting the accumulation of N-cadherin at cardiomyocyte membranes.

      • Pharmacological data support the hypothesis that CACNB2 functions in a calcium-channel dependent fashion to mediate cardiac contractility. However, CACNB2 might alternatively function as a MAGUK scaffolding unit to facilitate N-cadherin based cell attachments important for cardiac integrity.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Asymmetric requirement of surface epithelial β-catenin during the upper and lower jaw development (pages 663–674)

      Ye Sun, Ian Teng, Randi Huo, Michael G. Rosenfeld, Lorin E. Olson, Xiaokun Li and Xue Li

      Article first published online: 21 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23755

      Key Findings:

      • Mammalian epithelial Wnt/β-catenin signaling has asymetric functions in the upper and lower jaw development.

      • The canonical Wnt/β-catenin pathway coordinates expression of multiple epithelial signals including Fgf8, Bmp4, Shh, and Edn1.

      • Activation of epithelial Wnt/β-catenin signaling induces molecular transformation of the upper jaw to the lower jaw mesenchymal phenotype.

      • Evolutionary changes of the canonical Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway may lead to innovation of jaws.

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      Avian intervertebral disc arises from rostral sclerotome and lacks a nucleus pulposus: Implications for evolution of the vertebrate disc (pages 675–683)

      Bradley J. Bruggeman, Jennifer A. Maier, Yasmin S. Mohiuddin, Rae Powers, Yinting Lo, Nuno Guimarães-Camboa, Sylvia M. Evans and Brian D. Harfe

      Article first published online: 21 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23750

      Key findings:

      • Chicken intervertebral discs lack nuclei pulposi.

      • The notochord persists as a rod-like structure and expresses Shh throughout chicken embryogenesis.

      • Cells originating from the rostral half of each somite are responsible for forming the avian disc.

      • Data suggests that nuclei pulposi are only present in mammals.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      In vivo notch reactivation in differentiating cochlear hair cells induces sox2 and prox1 expression but does not disrupt hair cell maturation (pages 684–696)

      Zhiyong Liu, Thomas Owen, Jie Fang, R. Sathish Srinivasan and Jian Zuo

      Article first published online: 21 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23754

      Key findings:

      • Ectopic NICD in neonatal cochlear HCs reactivates Sox2 and Prox1.

      • Ectopic Sox2 is present in both IHCs and OHCs.

      • Ectopic Prox1 is specific to OHCs.

      • Prox1 is primarily expressed in OHCs not IHCs in normal development.

      • HCs mature normally despite ectopic NICD, Sox2 and Prox1 expression.

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      Reconstruction of cell lineage and spatiotemporal pattern formation of the mesoderm in the amphipod crustacean Orchestia cavimana (pages 697–717)

      Vera S. Hunnekuhl and Carsten Wolff

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23758

      Key findings:

      • Trace of the mesodermal layer from 8-cell stage up to somatic musculature by using a combination of advanced life imaging, in-vivo cell labeling and computer aided reconstruction.

      • Strict cell division pattern generates stereotypic cell arrangement of mesodermal precursors.

      • Gastrulation follows an invariant spatial and temporal pattern.

      • Clear border between naupliar (head) mesoderm and somatic (trunk) mesoderm.

      • Somatic muscle groups are generated by specific mesoteloblasts.

    7. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Hox transcription factors influence motoneuron identity through the integrated actions of both homeodomain and non-homeodomain regions (pages 718–731)

      Mala Misra, Emily Sours and Cynthia Lance-Jones

      Article first published online: 12 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23763

      Key findings:

      • Hoxd10 and Hoxd11 have similar DNA-binding homeodomains but exert opposing effects on motoneuron identity in the developing lumbosacral (LS) spinal cord: Hoxd10 promotes the development of anterior lateral subtypes while Hoxd11 promotes posterior medial subtypes. Mutant and chimeric Hoxd10 and Hoxd11 constructs were designed and misexpressed in the chick LS spinal cord to assess the functional roles of homeodomain versus non-homeodomain regions.

      • Hoxd10 requires both its homeodomain and non-homeodomain regions to specify lateral motoneuron subtypes.

      • The specification of medial motoneuron subtypes by Hoxd11 is governed entirely by its non-homeodomain regions.

      • Though their DNA-binding domains are similar in structure and sequence, Hoxd10 and Hoxd11 influence the expression of downstream targets through distinct molecular mechanisms.

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  5. Techniques

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A novel method for retinoic acid administration reveals differential and dose-dependent downregulation of Fgf3 in the developing inner ear and anterior CNS (pages 741–758)

      Stephanie Cadot, Dorothy Frenz and Mark Maconochie

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23748

      Key findings:

      • Administration of RA using chocolate/sugar pellets reproduces the range of phenotypes observed with gavage delivery

      • RA effects on anterior CNS formation and Fgf3 expression are dose- and time-dependent

      • Exogenous RA lateralizes and downregulates otic Fgf3 expression when administered at 7.75 dpc

      • In contrast, otic Fgf3 expression is only downregulated when RA is administered after hindbrain patterning

  6. Patterns & Phenotypes

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover
    3. Highlights
    4. ArtPix
    5. Research Articles
    6. Techniques
    7. Patterns & Phenotypes
    1. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Roundabout is required in the visceral mesoderm for proper microvillus length in the hindgut epithelium (pages 759–769)

      Nadine H. Soplop, Yi-Shan Cheng and Sunita G. Kramer

      Article first published online: 14 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23749

      Key findings:

      • Slit, Robo and Robo2 localize to discrete regions of the Drosophila embryonic hindgut.

      • Loss of Slit, Robo or Robo2 alters hindgut microvillus length.

      • Robo is specifically required in the visceral mesoderm for controlling microvillus length in the hindgut epithelium.

    2. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Paladin (X99384) is expressed in the vasculature and shifts from endothelial to vascular smooth muscle cells during mouse development (pages 770–786)

      Elisabet Wallgard, Anja Nitzsche, Jimmy Larsson, Xiaoyuan Guo, Lothar C. Dieterich, Anna Dimberg, Tommie Olofsson, Fredrik C. Pontén, Taija Mäkinen, Mattias Kalén and Mats Hellström

      Article first published online: 21 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23753

      Key findings:

      • Paladin, a putative phosphatase, is expressed in the vasculature.

      • During angiogenesis Paladin is expressed in endothelial cells of veins and capillaries.

      • In certain mature vessels, Paladin expression is shifted to vascular smooth muscle cells of arteries.

      • Paladin expression is reactivated during pathological tumor angiogenesis in the adult.

    3. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Isl1 and Ldb Co-regulators of transcription are essential early determinants of mouse limb development (pages 787–791)

      Ginat Narkis, Itai Tzchori, Tsadok Cohen, Alex Holtz, Eric Wier and Heiner Westphal

      Article first published online: 12 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23761

      Key findings:

      • Isl1 mutant embryos lack hindlimb buds.

      • Ldb1/2 double mutants embryos lack hindlimb buds.

      • Isl1 and the Ldb co-regulators of transcription are essential early determinants of mouse limb development.

      • Isl1/Ldb complexes regulate Fgf10 to orchestrate the earliest stages of hindlimb formation.

    4. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      A function for all posterior Hoxd genes during digit development? (pages 792–802)

      Saskia Delpretti, Jozsef Zakany and Denis Duboule

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23756

      Key Findings:

      • A slight and transient deregulation of Hoxd13 can affect the length of limb segments.

      • Scanning deletion analysis indicates that all posterior Hoxd genes participate to the making of digits.

      • Loss of function phenotypes of clustered genes must be interpreted in the context of their genomic neighborhood.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      FoxO1 is required in endothelial but not myocardial cell lineages during cardiovascular development (pages 803–813)

      Arunima Sengupta, Santanu Chakraborty, Jihye Paik, Katherine E. Yutzey and Heather J. Evans-Anderson

      Article first published online: 12 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23759

    6. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Overlapping expression patterns and redundant roles for AP-2 transcription factors in the developing mammalian retina (pages 814–829)

      Erin A. Bassett, Anna Korol, Paula A. Deschamps, Reinhard Buettner, Valerie A. Wallace, Trevor Williams and Judith A. West-Mays

      Article first published online: 12 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/dvdy.23762

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